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Building Collaboration and Securing Interest in Computer Science Education through Outreach Opportunities

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Conference

2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Tampa, Florida

Publication Date

June 15, 2019

Start Date

June 15, 2019

End Date

June 19, 2019

Conference Session

Technical Session 3: The Best of Computers in Education

Tagged Division

Computers in Education

Page Count

10

DOI

10.18260/1-2--32484

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/32484

Download Count

94

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Paper Authors

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Shaya Wolf University of Wyoming Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-3118-4186

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Shaya Wolf (swolf4@uwyo.edu) is currently pursuing her Ph.D. at the University of Wyoming. After completing Bachelors degrees in Math and Computer Science, her research focused on distributed systems, swarm communications, and encryption mechanisms. She is currently working on distributed continuous authentication systems, consensus protocols, and secure embedded systems. Her interests also extend to cybersecurity competitions and K12 computer science/cybersecurity outreach and education.

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Fiona P. Moss University of Wyoming

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Fiona P. Moss is a Computer Science Master's student at the University of Wyoming. She completed her Bachelors in Computer Science in India. Her research interests are machine learning and cyber-security, and she is currently working on her thesis involving the application of machine learning techniques for Network Intrusion Detection.

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Rasana Manandhar University of Wyoming

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Currently a Master's student at the University of Wyoming working on Continuous Authentication Systems.

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Madison Cooley University of Wyoming

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Madison Cooley is currently an undergraduate computer science student at the University of Wyoming.

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Rafer Cooley University of Wyoming Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-0024-2400

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Rafer Cooley is pursuing a Ph.D. at the University of Wyoming focusing on secure distributed systems. His interests include bio-inspired algorithms, Complex Adaptive Systems, and network protocols. He is currently working on bio-inspired solutions for securing industrial control systems.

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Andrea Carneal Burrows University of Wyoming Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0001-5925-3596

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Andrea C. Burrows is currently an Associate Professor in the Department of Secondary Education at the University of Wyoming, where she teaches courses in science methods and pedagogy. Dr. Burrows taught at Northern Kentucky University for five years. In 2010, she was hired as an external evaluator to conduct research on community/university partnership relations at the University of Cincinnati. She has received several awards including the: 1) Lillian C. Sherman Award for outstanding academic achievement (2011); 2) UW College of Education outstanding research award (2015); and 3) UW College of Education outstanding service award (2016). Her research interests include partnerships with in pre-service and in-service teachers in STEM Education with a focus on engineering education applications. An active member of AERA, ASEE, ASTE, NARST, and NSTA, Dr. Burrows has presented at over 50 conferences, published in ranked journals (e.g. Journal of Chemical Education), reviewed conference proposals (e.g ASEE, AERA), and co-edits the CITE-Science journal. Additionally, she taught high school and middle school science for twelve years in Florida and Virginia, and she was the learning resource specialist for the technology demonstration school in Florida.

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Mike Borowczak University of Wyoming Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0001-9409-8245

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Dr. Mike Borowczak is an Assitant Professor of Computer Science and the Director of the Cybersecurity Education and Research center (CEDAR) at the University of Wyoming. He earned his Ph.D. in Computer Science and Engineering (2013) as well as his BS in Computer Engineering (2007) from the University of Cincinnati. His research focused on detection and prevention of information leakage from hardware side channels. His current research interests include investigating the safety, resilience, and security of decentralized components, devices, and system architectures from theoretical modeling, to simulation and practical implementations. He is also involved in K-20 CS/cybersecurity education research and was the 2019 RMS ASEE conference co-chair.

Mike also has over a decade of industry and research experience – mostly revolving around the semiconductor and bioinformatics industries – with specific experience at Texas Instruments, Intel, and Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. In addition to his industry experience, Mike spent two years, while completing his Ph.D., as a National Science Foundation GK-12 fellow – teaching and bringing real-world STEM applications in two urban high schools. Since then, he has worked with university faculty to promote and extend K20 STEM outreach in Ohio, Oregon, Texas, and Wyoming.
He has authored peer-reviewed articles and papers, presented at national and international conferences, and taught undergraduate/graduate courses in Computer Security, Data Mining, VLSI and pedagogy in STEM.

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Abstract

Automation and mechanization require students to master the utilization and creation of new technology. Vital for potential careers, tomorrow's professionals require technological understanding to remain competitive in a job market driven by engineering advances. Regardless, most K-12 schools in the US and other countries do not currently offer Computer Science courses. To address these issues, multiple week-long summer outreach camps were designed for K-12 students and teachers. These camps delivered programming foundations in JavaScript and Python programming using online editors with both traditional and block-style programming options. Additionally, the camps utilized BBC Micro:Bits, pocket-sized computers fit with numerous functionalities. During interactive labs, participants collaborated with experts to develop various programs focused on topics such as password cracking, secure wireless communication, hardware hacking, securing Internet of Things devices, robotics, data collection, algorithm design, automation, decomposition, and pattern recognition. In addition to the explorative labs, students and teachers also worked with camp instructors in daily work sessions, using modified peer-instruction methods, to identify and analyze key Cybersecurity concepts such as modularization, simplicity, minimization, domain separation, least privilege, information hiding, layering, process isolation, resource encapsulation, and abstraction. The camp culminated with student demonstrations for their friends, family, and instructors.

Wolf, S., & Moss, F. P., & Manandhar, R., & Cooley, M., & Cooley, R., & Burrows, A. C., & Borowczak, M. (2019, June), Building Collaboration and Securing Interest in Computer Science Education through Outreach Opportunities Paper presented at 2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition , Tampa, Florida. 10.18260/1-2--32484

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2019 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015