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Classroom implementation of game-based module for geotechical engineering education

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Conference

2017 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Columbus, Ohio

Publication Date

June 24, 2017

Start Date

June 24, 2017

End Date

June 28, 2017

Conference Session

Let’s Get Pumped: Innovative Approaches for Better Student Engagement

Tagged Division

Civil Engineering

Page Count

11

DOI

10.18260/1-2--28036

Permanent URL

https://strategy.asee.org/28036

Download Count

489

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Paper Authors

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Victoria Bennett Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

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Professor Victoria Bennett is an Assistant Professor in the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). She is interested in improving undergraduate engineering education through hands-on, experiential, and game-based learning.

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Tarek Abdoun Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

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Professor Dr. Tarek Abdoun is the Iovino Chair professor and associate dean of Research for the School of Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). He is the technical director of NSF Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES) Facility at RPI.

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Casper Harteveld Northeastern University

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Dr. Casper Harteveld is an Assistant Professor of Game Design at Northeastern University, has affiliated appointments in Computer Science, Electrical & Computer Engineering, Mechanical & Industrial Engineering, and with the School of Law, and works closely with faculty in Marine Science and Public Policy. His research focuses on using games to study and improve decision-making, and through these efforts both to advance our knowledge and to engage a broad cross-section of people globally about societal issues. He applies games especially in areas where it is challenging to study and educate in natural environments and collects detailed and expansive behavioral data in a controlled manner.

Working across disciplines, Dr. Harteveld has designed and evaluated games on flooding, urban heat islands, debris collection, and pro se litigants. He is a strong proponent of integrating research and education and a significant portion of his work is devoted to translating research outcomes to the classroom or informal settings, in order to make sure that the next generation is ready to deal with the societal challenges of the 21st Century.

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Flora P McMartin Broad-based Knowledge, LLC

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Flora P. McMartin is the founder of Broad-based Knowledge, LLC (BbK), a consulting firm focused on the evaluation of the use and deployment of technology assisted teaching and learning. Throughout her career, she has served as an external evaluator for a number of NSF-funded projects associated with faculty development, community building, peer review of learning materials, and dissemination of educational innovation. She was PI for the project ”Learning from the Best: How Award Winning Courseware has Impacted Engineering Education.” This research focuses on determining how high quality courseware is being disseminated and what impact it is having on the culture of engineering education as measured by changes in student learning, teaching practices, and the careers of the authors of these materials.

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Usama El Shamy P.E. Southern Methodist University

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Dr. Usama El Shamy is an associate professor in the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department at Southern Methodist University. He received his Ph.D. in Civil Engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 2004. He is the Principal Investigator and Project Director of the NSF funded TUES-Type 1 project: “A Multi-Institutional Classroom Learning Environment for Geotechnical Engineering Education.”

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Abstract

This paper highlights an ongoing effort to address the educational gaps in geotechnical engineering education through the development and implementation of a transferable and scalable Mixed Reality and Mobile (MR&M) Educational Game, “Geo Explorer.” A game-based course module was implemented in existing geotechnical engineering courses. The newly developed game has the potential to transform the way geotechnical engineering is taught by addressing the current critical gap of lack of exposure to field testing and practical experience. Ultimately, the use of MR&M games should result in a better-trained and globally minded workforce. The game will be available for free for educators and its implementation does not require additional resources. The game-based module is flexible and variations of the game can be scaled with little difficulty, depending on the targeted audience.

The formative evaluation of the curriculum module was designed to ensure that the game addressed the module’s learning outcomes and included appropriate metrics for measuring student learning. To achieve these assessment goals, pre-game and post-game implementation surveys were conducted. The classroom implementation included a lecture to teach Cone Penetration Testing (CPT) procedures and analysis using traditional methods and demonstration photos and videos. Then students were asked to take the pre-game survey, which included technical questions designed to evaluate their learning. This was followed by introducing the CPT portion of the GeoExplorer game to the class. After completing the game assignment, the students completed the post-game survey, which included the same technical questions, as well as additional questions designed to assess game quality and students perception of its effectiveness. Findings from these surveys will be discussed herein. One noteworthy finding was that over 90% of students agreed or strongly agreed that the game is an effective way to implement class learning into practice.

Bennett, V., & Abdoun, T., & Harteveld, C., & McMartin, F. P., & El Shamy, U. (2017, June), Classroom implementation of game-based module for geotechical engineering education Paper presented at 2017 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Columbus, Ohio. 10.18260/1-2--28036

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