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Comparison of Entrepreneurial Mindset Course Learning Objectives: Evaluating Consistency and Clarity

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Conference

2020 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access

Location

Virtual On line

Publication Date

June 22, 2020

Start Date

June 22, 2020

End Date

June 26, 2021

Conference Session

ENT Division Technical Session: Assessment Tools and Practices

Tagged Division

Entrepreneurship & Engineering Innovation

Page Count

18

DOI

10.18260/1-2--34312

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/34312

Download Count

35

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Paper Authors

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Laine E. Rumreich Ohio State University

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Laine Rumreich is a Master's student studying Computer Science and Engineering at The Ohio State University. She completed her undergraduate research thesis in the Department of Engineering Education and has been a research assistant in the department for three years. Her primary research interests are in the areas of coding education and engineering entrepreneurship.

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Faith Logan Ohio State University

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Faith Logan is a current sophomore at the Ohio State University, where she is pursuing a degree in Secondary Mathematics Education. Outside of class, she is an undergraduate researcher for the Department of Engineering Education and a math tutor for the Ohio State University's Mathematics Department.

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Zachary Dix Ohio State University

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Nicholas Rees Sattele Ohio State University

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Nicholas is an Undergraduate Research Associate with The Ohio State Department of Engineering Education. He is in the process of completing a B.S. in Computer Science and Engineering at Ohio State. His interests include incorporating Entrepreneurial Minded Learning into engineering coursework and interdisciplinary innovation.

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Krista M. Kecskemety Ohio State University

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Krista Kecskemety is an Assistant Professor of Practice in the Department of Engineering Education at The Ohio State University. Krista received her B.S. in Aerospace Engineering at The Ohio State University in 2006 and received her M.S. from Ohio State in 2007. In 2012, Krista completed her Ph.D. in Aerospace Engineering at Ohio State. Her engineering education research interests include investigating first-year engineering student experiences, faculty experiences, and the connection between the two.

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Ann D. Christy P.E. Ohio State University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0001-9172-0609

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Ann D. Christy, PE, is a professor of Food, Agricultural, and Biological Engineering and a professor of Engineering Education at the Ohio State University (OSU). She earned both her B.S. in agricultural engineering and M.S. in biomedical engineering at OSU, and her Ph.D. in environmental engineering at Clemson University. She worked for an engineering consulting firm before entering academia and continues to collaborate with the consulting industry. She has taught courses in bioenergy, biological engineering, capstone design, HVAC, thermodynamics, waste management, professional development, and engineering teaching. Her research interests include energy, the environment, and engineering education. She is assistant dean for teaching and learning in the College of Engineering. She is a second-generation woman engineer.

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Abstract

The entrepreneurial mindset (EM) has become of increasing interest for engineering educators as a method to better prepare students for the workforce and generate more valuable innovations. In this paper, EM is defined in terms of six principles: Curiosity, Connections, Creating Value, Communication, Collaboration, and Character. These principles, labeled as the 6 C’s, are adapted from materials from the Kern Entrepreneurial Engineering Network (KEEN). However, despite the increased adoption of EM by educators, few tools exist to aid evaluation of curricula through an EM lens and few studies investigate their effectiveness. Three EM course content evaluation tools have been created in the recent past by KEEN-affiliated universities: KEEN Student Outcomes (KSO), expanded KSO (eKSO), and Entrepreneurial Mindset Learning Objectives (EMLO). These tools have not yet been evaluated against one another to determine if they are measuring similar EM concepts. The goal of this paper is to compare and evaluate these three tools. To do so, each tool is used on three existing courses at The Ohio State University, each designed with EM in mind and each representing a different year within an undergraduate engineering curriculum. A document analysis was done for each course using each EM evaluation tool, generating nine datasets. The results for each course were then compared across the evaluation tools to measure similarities and differences between the three tools. It was found that the three tools were largely inconsistent with one another in their determination of the courses’ level of adoption of the 6 C’s of EM. Additionally, it was found that many aspects of the tools were overly abstract or particular, making them difficult to use for the purposes of measuring the EM content of a course. Although these three sets of objectives may be useful for integrating EM content in courses, the findings of this paper indicate that they are not measuring the same things and are thus difficult to utilize for the purposes of measurement.

Rumreich, L. E., & Logan, F., & Dix, Z., & Sattele, N. R., & Kecskemety, K. M., & Christy, A. D. (2020, June), Comparison of Entrepreneurial Mindset Course Learning Objectives: Evaluating Consistency and Clarity Paper presented at 2020 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access, Virtual On line . 10.18260/1-2--34312

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