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Design For Impact: Inquiry-based Activities for Important Concepts in Heat Transfer that Faculty Will Actually Use

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Conference

2016 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

New Orleans, Louisiana

Publication Date

June 26, 2016

Start Date

June 26, 2016

End Date

August 28, 2016

ISBN

978-0-692-68565-5

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

NSF Grantees Poster Session II

Tagged Topics

Diversity and NSF Grantees Poster Session

Page Count

6

DOI

10.18260/p.26678

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/26678

Download Count

142

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Paper Authors

biography

Margot A Vigeant Bucknell University

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Margot Vigeant is a professor of chemical engineering and an associate dean of engineering at Bucknell University. She earned her B.S. in chemical engineering from Cornell University, and her M.S. and Ph.D., also in chemical engineering, from the University of Virginia. Her primary research focus is on engineering pedagogy at the undergraduate level. She is particularly interested in the teaching and learning of concepts related to thermodynamics. She is also interested in active, collaborative, and problem-based learning, and in the ways hands-on activities and technology in general and games in particular can be used to improve student engagement.

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Michael J. Prince Bucknell University

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Dr. Michael Prince is a professor of chemical engineering at Bucknell University and co-director of the National Effective Teaching Institute. His research examines a range of engineering education topics, including how to assess and repair student misconceptions and how to increase the adoption of research-based instructional strategies by college instructors and corporate trainers. He is actively engaged in presenting workshops on instructional design to both academic and corporate instructors.

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Katharyn E. K. Nottis Bucknell University

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Dr. Nottis is an Educational Psychologist and Professor of Education at Bucknell University. Her research has focused on meaningful learning in science and engineering education, approached from the perspective of Human Constructivism. She has authored several publications and given numerous presentations on the generation of analogies, misconceptions, and facilitating learning in science and engineering education. She has been involved in collaborative research projects focused on conceptual learning in chemistry, chemical engineering, seismology, and astronomy.

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Milo Koretsky Oregon State University

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Milo Koretsky is a Professor of Chemical Engineering at Oregon State University. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from UC San Diego and his Ph.D. from UC Berkeley, all in Chemical Engineering. He currently has research activity in areas related engineering education and is interested in integrating technology into effective educational practices and in promoting the use of higher-level cognitive skills in engineering problem solving. His research interests particularly focus on what prevents students from being able to integrate and extend the knowledge developed in specific courses in the core curriculum to the more complex, authentic problems and projects they face as professionals. Dr. Koretsky is one of the founding members of the Center for Lifelong STEM Education Research at OSU.

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Thomas W Ekstedt Oregon State University

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Thomas Ekstedt is a software developer in the School of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering at Oregon State University. He is involved in the development of technology-based educational systems, particularly in the areas of concept-based instruction and interactive simulation of physical phenomena.

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Abstract

In previous work, we documented that inquiry-based activities could be very effective tools for misconception repair in heat transfer and thermodynamics. However, since many courses in the engineering core do not have laboratory sections, or are very large, it is challenging for many instructors to adopt these activities. Instructors may modify the activities to adapt them to their context, but in that case, the effectiveness of the activities as educational tools is unknown. Our goals in the current work are to first, create versions (modes) of the activities that are easier to use and assess their educational effectiveness. To what extent does delivery mode impact conceptual learning? Our second goal is to share all modes of all activities, with sufficient information that faculty can make good choices about their adoption, and learn which factors are most important for faculty adoption. The first two tasks towards these goals, creation of multiple modes for each activity, assessing each mode’s educational effectiveness, have been completed. Each activity comes in five modes – as an experiment conducted by student groups, as an experiment demonstrated by an instructor, as a simulation used by students, as a simulation demonstrated by the faculty, and as a thought experiment. For each of these activities / modes, we have compiled effectiveness data and ease of use information. In the third and final phase of this work, we now are sharing all modalities of these activities as downloadable packets/online assignments through the AIChE Concept Warehouse. This final phase of the project focuses on tracking faculty adoption and the factors (effectiveness, ease) that impact their adoption. We invite instructors teaching heat transfer to log in to the Concept Warehouse and use the activities for free in class and let us know what you think of them.

Vigeant, M. A., & Prince, M. J., & Nottis, K. E. K., & Koretsky, M., & Ekstedt, T. W. (2016, June), Design For Impact: Inquiry-based Activities for Important Concepts in Heat Transfer that Faculty Will Actually Use Paper presented at 2016 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, New Orleans, Louisiana. 10.18260/p.26678

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