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Development Of A Nanotechnology Curriculum At Oregon State University

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Conference

2007 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Honolulu, Hawaii

Publication Date

June 24, 2007

Start Date

June 24, 2007

End Date

June 27, 2007

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

ChE: Bioengineering, nanotechnology, and systems engineering in the Classroom

Tagged Division

Chemical Engineering

Page Count

17

Page Numbers

12.517.1 - 12.517.17

DOI

10.18260/1-2--2182

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/2182

Download Count

38

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Paper Authors

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Milo Koretsky Oregon State University

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Milo Koretsky is an Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering at Oregon State University. He currently has research activity in areas related to thin film materials processing and engineering education. He is author of the text Engineering and Chemical Thermodynamics, which includes an integrated, menu driven computer program ThermoSolver. He is interested in integrating technology into effective education practices and in promoting the use of higher level cognitive skills in engineering problem solving. Dr. Koretsky is a six-time Intel Faculty Fellow and has won awards for his work in engineering education at the university and national levels.

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Danielle Amatore Oregon State University

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Danielle Amatore, a PhD candidate in chemical engineering at Oregon State University, has a research focus on engineering education, with a special interest in applying qualitative research to assess learning in the engineering classroom. In addition, she has developed curriculum built on active learning for nanoelectronics at the graduate and undergraduate levels, as well as for K12 level. She obtained experience in the semiconductor industry while working at Intel and LSI Logic.

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Shoichi Kimura Oregon State University

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Sho Kimura works on bulk synthesis of nano-sized silicon nitride powder, carbon nanotubes, and silicon carbide nanotubes. He has taught senior Chemical Plant Design courses since he joined OSU in 1989 and a sophomore level Material and Energy Balances for six years. He currently works with a US company as a senior consultant on commercialization of carbon nanotube mass production.

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Alexandre Yokochi Oregon State University

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Alex Yokochi is an Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering at Oregon State University. His research interests include the preparation and characterization of advanced materials, including nanostructured materials, and sustainable energy options.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Development of a Nanotechnology Curriculum at Oregon State University

Abstract

There is a need to adapt engineering and science curricula to equip students with the skills and attributes needed to contribute effectively in manufacturing based processes that rely on nanotechnology. Two activities have been undertaken at Oregon State University (OSU) in support of this goal: (1) development of a Nanotechnology Processes Option in the Chemical Engineering (ChE) Department and (2) development a survey course within the College of Engineering (CoE) that is broadly available to all engineering undergraduates. The hands-on based Option is designed to allow students both to develop an in-depth understanding of how the core skills of the ChE discipline can be applied towards manufacturing of nanotechnology based products as well as to provide them with multidisciplinary experiences.

The Nanotechnology Processes Option contains six courses, five required courses and an elective. Two entirely new sophomore level courses have been developed. The Science, Engineering and Social Impact of Nanotechnology (ENGR 221) is a general engineering survey course so that students from Biological, Electrical, Environmental, Industrial, Manufacturing and Mechanical Engineering will also be exposed to the field of nanotechnology. Thus, there will inherently be a multidisciplinary approach. This course includes several features to promote active learning, including (1) hands-on activities and demonstrations, (2) the integrated use of wireless laptops through an in-house developed web-based learning tool to promote metacognition and assessment of student learning, and (3) a capstone ethics project where students complete a risk assessment of the impact of nanotechnology on society. Additionally, this course will focus on synthesizing fundamental concepts in science and engineering towards applications in nanotechnology. The other new sophomore course, Material and Energy Balances in Nanotechnology (ChE 214), is a ChE specific laboratory-based course, emphasizing how the fundamental skills students have just learned couple to nanotechnology. For ChE students, the approach is to develop a complementary experience early in their undergraduate studies. One class provides the breadth of multidisciplinary experiences while the other provides depth of specific technical applications within the discipline. These sophomore level courses lead into three upper division courses and into the senior laboratory sequence. The duality (breadth and depth) is reinforced in senior laboratory (ChE 414/415/416) where students need to synthesize both aspects in the preparation of a white paper and in their capstone project, and, in certain cases, through an Honors College thesis. The curricular development leverages the growing research and commercialization activity of the Oregon Nanoscience and Microtechnologies Institute (ONAMI). ONAMI leadership is used to facilitate input on the content of the new courses, as a resource for guest lecturers, and in assistance in the evaluation of the effectiveness of the new courses in achieving their learning outcomes.

Koretsky, M., & Amatore, D., & Kimura, S., & Yokochi, A. (2007, June), Development Of A Nanotechnology Curriculum At Oregon State University Paper presented at 2007 Annual Conference & Exposition, Honolulu, Hawaii. 10.18260/1-2--2182

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