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Development Of The Parents’ Engineering Awareness Survey (Peas) According To The Knowledge, Attitudes, And Behavior Framework

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Conference

2010 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Louisville, Kentucky

Publication Date

June 20, 2010

Start Date

June 20, 2010

End Date

June 23, 2010

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

New Learning Paradigms II

Tagged Division

Educational Research and Methods

Page Count

16

Page Numbers

15.423.1 - 15.423.16

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/16293

Download Count

161

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Paper Authors

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Juyeon Yun Purdue University

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Juyeon is a researcher at the Institute for P-12 Engineering Research and Learning (INSPIRE) at School of Engineering Education of Purdue University. Ms. Yun received her M.S. in Hospitality & Tourism Management from Purdue University and dual B.S. degrees in Business Administration and English Language & Literature from Seoul Women's University in South Korea. Her general research interest is consumer behavior, particularly psychological factors, including motivation and decision-making process. Her current focus is on assessment design, instrument development, and K-12 engineering education.

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Monica Cardella Purdue University

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Monica Cardella is an Assistant Professor of Engineering Education and the Co-Director of Assessment Research for the Institute for P-12 Engineering Research and Learning (INSPIRE) at Purdue University. Prof. Cardella earned a BSc in mathematics from the University of Puget Sound and a MS and PhD in
Industrial Engineering from the University of Washington. Her research interests include: K-12 engineering education, engineering design, the role of parents in engineering education, assessment, learning in informal environments, and mathematical thinking.

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Senay Purzer Purdue University

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Senay Purzer is an Assistant Professor in the School of Engineering Education at Purdue University. She is also the Co-Director of Assessment Research for the Institute for P-12 Engineering Research and Learning (INSPIRE). She received a Ph.D. and a M.A in Science Education, Department of Curriculum and Instruction from Arizona State University. Her creative research focuses on collaborative learning, design & decision-making, and the role of engineering self-efficacy on student achievement.

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Ming-Chien Hsu Purdue University

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Ming-Chien is a doctoral student of Engineering Education and a research assistant for the Institute for P-12 Engineering Research and Learning (INSPIRE) at Purdue Univeristy. She received for B.S. in Electrical Enigneering from National Chiao Tung University, Taiwan, and a MS in Electrical Engineering from Purdue University. Her current research focus is on engineering design and K-12 engineering education.

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Yoojung Chae Purdue University

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Yoojung Chae is a postdoctoral research assistant in Engineering Education Dept.at Purdue University. She received her M.S. in Educational Psychology (specialization in Gifted and Talented education) from University of Connecticut, and a Ph.D. in Educational Psychology (specialization in Gifted and Talented education) from Purdue University. She has served as the
coordinator of GERI Saturday and summer enrichment programs, where she coordinated student courses as well as parent information sessions. Her research interests include students' perceptions of their learning experience as and how to promote students' learning who show giftedness in the Engineering
and Technology areas.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Development of Parents’ Engineering Awareness Survey (PEAS) According to the Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behavior Framework

Abstract

With increased interest in promoting engineering as a field of study and career pathway to both college and pre-college student, it is important to understand the many factors that impact students’ learning and decision-making processes. In this paper, one of the important environmental factors surrounding students was selected as a main research subject: parents and other similar caregivers. Parents play a significant role in mediating between teachers and students as well as motivating children’s interest in engineering. To better understand the influence of parents in children’s engineering education, it is important to have a proper assessment tool for measuring parents’ engineering awareness. However, while many researchers have acknowledged the importance of parental involvement, no suitable instrument exists to be used for parents (and other caregivers). The main aim of this study is to develop and empirically validate an instrument which assesses parents’ knowledge of, attitudes towards, and behavior related to engineering education. This paper will present a rigorous instrument development model and an example of how this model has been applied. Additionally, the paper presents an example of an instrument that captures the three aspects of learning represented in the KAB framework: knowledge, attitude and behavior.

Introduction

Engineering has been facing challenges due to a highdrop-rate amongstcollege students in the United States despite an increased market demand for engineers and engineering professionals.1,2 One response to this challenge has been an emphasis on engineering education for pre-college students, as this can play a pivotal role in motivating children into engineering.3 In other words, students’ engineering education experience in pre-college school is a predictor of pursuit and success of engineering degrees in college.4, 5 According to the National Academy of Engineering and National Research Council (2009)6, engineering education in K-12 schools poses potential benefits overall to students since engineering improves learning and achievement in other subjects, such as mathematics and science. Also, it helps students better understand engineeringand, thus, there is an opportunity for an increase in the number of students pursuing engineering. Indeed, engineering is the practical application of science, mathematics, and technology to solve problems by proceeding better lives for humans. Despite of the importance of engineering, many students, unfortunately, perceive engineering as a challenging area and even misunderstand the concept of engineering.7Here, some questions might be raised: what makes students perceive engineering as a difficult major? and What sources of information give students that impression?

Answers for these questions might be detected by considering factors surrounding students. Environmental factors, such as parents, peers, and teachers, affect students’ educational aspiration and occupational interests. Among these factors, parental involvement highly influences both students and teachers.8, 9 Many researchers in science and engineering education

Yun, J., & Cardella, M., & Purzer, S., & Hsu, M., & Chae, Y. (2010, June), Development Of The Parents’ Engineering Awareness Survey (Peas) According To The Knowledge, Attitudes, And Behavior Framework Paper presented at 2010 Annual Conference & Exposition, Louisville, Kentucky. https://peer.asee.org/16293

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