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Diversity in Chemical Engineering Education: Status and Perspectives

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Conference

2015 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Seattle, Washington

Publication Date

June 14, 2015

Start Date

June 14, 2015

End Date

June 17, 2015

ISBN

978-0-692-50180-1

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Diversity in Chemical Engineering Education: Status and Perspectives

Tagged Division

Chemical Engineering

Tagged Topic

Diversity

Page Count

12

Page Numbers

26.554.1 - 26.554.12

DOI

10.18260/p.23892

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/23892

Download Count

105

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Paper Authors

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Cheryl A Bodnar University of Pittsburgh

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Cheryl A. Bodnar, PhD, CTDP is an Assistant Professor (Teaching Track) in the Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering at the Swanson School of Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh. She obtained her certification as a Training and Development Professional (CTDP) from the Canadian Society for Training and Development (CSTD) in 2010, providing her with a solid background in instructional design, facilitation and evaluation.

Dr. Bodnar’s research interests relate to the incorporation of active learning techniques in undergraduate classes (problem based learning, games and simulations, etc.) as well as integration of innovation and entrepreneurship into the Chemical and Petroleum Engineering as well as broader engineering curriculum. In addition, she is actively engaged in the development of a variety of informal science education approaches with the goal of exciting and teaching K-12 students about regenerative medicine and its potential.

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Arthur Felse Northwestern University

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Karen A High Clemson University

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Jason M. Keith Mississippi State University

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Jason Keith is the Interim Dean and Earnest W. and Mary Ann Deavenport, Jr. Chair in the Bagley College of Engineering at Mississippi State University, a position he has held since March, 2014. Keith received his B.S. in Chemical Engineering from The University of Akron and his PhD from the University of Notre Dame. He was a faculty member at Michigan Technological University from 2000-2011 and was Director of the Dave C. Swalm School of Chemical Engineering and holder of the Earnest W. Deavenport Chair from 2011-2014. Keith received the Raymond W. Fahien Award from the Chemical Engineering Division of ASEE in 2008.

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Adrienne Minerick Michigan Technological University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-2382-7831

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Adrienne Minerick received her M.S. and Ph.D. from the University of Notre Dame and B.S. from Michigan Technological University. Adrienne’s research interests include electrokinetics, predominantly dielectrophoretic characterizations of cells, and the development of biomedical microdevices. She earned a NSF CAREER award and was nominated for Michigan Professor of the Year in 2014. Research within her Medical micro-Device Engineering Research Laboratory (M.D. – ERL) also inspires the development of Desktop Experiment Modules (DEMos) for use in chemical engineering classrooms or as outreach activities in area schools (see www.mderl.org). Adrienne is currently co-Chair of ASEE's Diversity Committee and PIC I Chair; she has previously served on WIED, ChED, and NEE leadership teams and contributed to 37 ASEE conference proceedings articles.

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Ann Saterbak Rice University

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Jennifer Cole Northwestern University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0001-7104-2986

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Jennifer Cole is the Assistant Chair in Chemical and Biological Engineering in the Robert R. McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science at Northwestern University. Dr. Cole’s primary teaching is in capstone and freshman design, and her research interest are in engineering design education.

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Abstract

Diversity in Chemical Engineering Education: Status and PerspectivesFor several years now, there has been a call for a more diverse workforce within engineering.Even as far back as 1998, the National Academy of Engineering published a report entitled“Diversity in Engineering” that described how the current state of the engineering workforce wasnot representative of the population of the United States. The report went on to outline thatwithout representation of under-represented minorities, women as well as individual diversity,the solutions to engineering problems could suffer from a lack of input from individuals withdifferent life experiences.1 Fifteen years later we find ourselves not significantly ahead of wherewe were at the time the report was issued. Recently, the National Science Foundation’s biennialreport on “Women, Minorities and Persons with Disabilities in Science and Engineering” waspublished which showed that the engineering and scientific workforce is still made up of 51%white males2 despite continued efforts on the part of academic institutions, professionalorganizations and other stakeholders to address this issue.As part of the ASEE’s “Year of Action on Diversity”, the chemical engineering divisionassembled a committee to perform a review of the state of diversity within its division and toidentify opportunities where improvements could be made and a plan for accomplishing thesegoals. The diversity committee performed preliminary analysis of the chemical engineeringdivision’s membership information and compared it against diversity data for engineering facultyand the overall engineering workforce. Chemical engineering divisions’ membershipinformation was obtained from ASEE’s membership unit, data on diversity in engineeringworkforce was extracted from NSF’s workforce data archive2, and data on diversity inengineering faculty was extracted from ASEE’s Engineering by the Numbers document.4 It wasfound that gender diversity in the division exceeded that of both doctoral level professionals andchemical engineering faculty but still fell short of the general working population. Diversity ofunderrepresented minorities within the division was at similar levels to those within doctorallevel professions and chemical engineering faculty except for the Asian/Pacific Islander womenand Hispanic men groups which were found to be underrepresented in the division.In an effort to inform the division of the current status of diversity and provide a forum forchange to occur, the division is planning to host a diversity panel that will include panelists fromdifferent career stages that can share their experiences and perspectives on diversity. Eachpanelist will be provided with a short survey that will allow them to inform the committee aboutthe diversity issues they feel have most relevance as we move forward within the chemicalengineering division. Quantitative and qualitative analysis of results from this survey will beperformed to provide perspectives on the issues of diversity within the chemical engineeringdivision membership.

Bodnar, C. A., & Felse, A., & High, K. A., & Keith, J. M., & Minerick, A., & Saterbak, A., & Cole, J. (2015, June), Diversity in Chemical Engineering Education: Status and Perspectives Paper presented at 2015 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Seattle, Washington. 10.18260/p.23892

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2015 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015