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Doing the Backflip: Using Classroom Technology to Adapt a Flipped Class to the HyFlex Teaching Model

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Conference

2021 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access

Location

Virtual Conference

Publication Date

July 26, 2021

Start Date

July 26, 2021

End Date

July 19, 2022

Conference Session

Engineering Design Graphics Division Technical Session 3: Flipped Classroom

Tagged Division

Engineering Design Graphics

Page Count

16

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/36992

Download Count

121

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Paper Authors

biography

Nathan John Washuta P.E. The Citadel Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-4575-0564

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Dr. Nathan Washuta is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at The Citadel in Charleston, SC. He received both his B.S. and Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from The University of Maryland – College Park. His primary research interests include Hydrodynamics, Turbulence, and Experimental Methods.

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biography

Patrick Bass The Citadel Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0001-6495-6202

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Patrick Bass is an assistant professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at The Citadel, in Charleston, SC. He received his B.S. degree in aerospace engineering from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Daytona Beach, FL, in 2005, his M.E. degree in space operations from the University of Colorado, Colorado Springs, CO, in 2009, and his Ph.D. in materials engineering from Auburn University, Auburn, AL, in 2016. His main areas of research interest are electroactive polymers and space mechanics.

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biography

Emily Kate Bierman The Citadel

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Dr. Emily Bierman is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at The Citadel. She received her B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from Purdue University, her M.B.A. from Clarke College, her M.S. in Mechanical Engineering from University of Wisconsin, and her Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from North Carolina State University. Her research and interests’ areas include high pressure combustion, internal combustion engines, and engineering education.

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Abstract

In recent years, the implementation of flipped classrooms in engineering education has experienced tremendous growth. This approach typically features asynchronous lecture content delivery outside of the classroom, which frees up in-class time to be spent on more active learning methods with instructor interaction, such as problem-solving sessions. The flipped classroom model was implemented into a sophomore-level Computer Applications course at The Citadel a number of years ago, with positive results. In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, classes at The Citadel have adopted the HyFlex teaching model, in which a course is simultaneously taught in-person in the classroom and via synchronous online delivery. While this method reduces classroom capacity to enable social distancing, it has also impacted the ability of the instructor to provide one-on-one instruction to students as they complete the in-class exercises. The use of classroom technology, including various cameras, annotation devices, and supporting software, has not only solved some of the challenges introduced in the HyFlex model, but has also provided improvements upon the standard flipped class. The present paper will discuss the classroom technology and methods used to supplement traditional in-class assistance to provide one-on-one interaction to students both in the classroom and those attending synchronously online, with a discussion of lessons learned and best practices. Direct and indirect course assessment and student perceptions of learning will be compared between the traditional flipped classroom and a flipped class using the HyFlex model.

Washuta, N. J., & Bass, P., & Bierman, E. K. (2021, July), Doing the Backflip: Using Classroom Technology to Adapt a Flipped Class to the HyFlex Teaching Model Paper presented at 2021 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access, Virtual Conference. https://peer.asee.org/36992

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