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Early Engineering through Service-learning: Adapting a University Model to High School

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Conference

2012 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

San Antonio, Texas

Publication Date

June 10, 2012

Start Date

June 10, 2012

End Date

June 13, 2012

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Service as an Element of Education

Tagged Division

K-12 & Pre-College Engineering

Page Count

19

Page Numbers

25.484.1 - 25.484.19

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/21242

Download Count

32

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Paper Authors

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William C. Oakes Purdue University, West Lafayette

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William Oakes is the Director of the EPICS Program at Purdue University, one of the founding faculty members of the School of Engineering Education, and a courtesy faculty member in mechanical engineering and curriculum and instruction in the College of Education. He is an Fellow of the ASEE and NSPE. He was the first engineer to win the Campus Compact Thomas Ehrlich Faculty Award for Service-learning. He was a co-recipient of the 2005 National Academy of Engineering’s Bernard Gordon Prize for Innovation in Engineering and Technology Education for his work in EPICS.

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Pamela Dexter Purdue University, West Lafayette

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Pamela Dexter graduated from Purdue University with a bachelor's of arts degree in education and worked as the Gifted & Talented Program Coordinator and teacher for a local school corporation. Dexter was also the Director of Marketing and Resource Development for Lafayette Neighborhood Housing Services, Inc., before joining Purdue University’s EPICS (Engineering Projects in Community Service) program. Dexter has been the EPICS High School Program Coordinator since inception of the program in 2006. Dexter is dedicated to the national dissemination of engineering service-learning design education in schools across the U.S. and abroad. These efforts blend the outreach initiatives of the EPICS program and Purdue University’s College of Engineering. Dexter institutionalizes the high school program through local, national, and international partnerships and leads efforts in curriculum development as well as teacher development and certification.

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Jane Hunter University of Arizona

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Jane Hunter received her Ph.D. from the University of Arizona Center for the Study of Higher Education. She holds an M.S. degree in engineering management and a B.S. degree with distinction in mechanical engineering. She is the Associate Director of the Engineering Management Program at the University of Arizona and is a PMI-certified Project Management Professional (PMP). Her areas of interest include engineering education, teaching strategies, assessment and evaluation of program objectives and learning outcomes, student teamwork and group dynamics, business and technology management, strategic and operational planning, project management, and technical sales and marketing. Prior to joining the University, Hunter worked for several companies, including IBM and Anaquest, Inc., as an Engineer, Engineering Manager, Technical Sales Professional, and Director of Informational Technology. At the University of Arizona, she oversees the freshman engineering experience, which includes the introductory engineering course required of entry-level students. She also teaches undergraduate/graduate courses in the Engineering Management program. She is a member of Tau Beta Pi Engineering Honor Society, American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE), Project Management Institute (PMI), and American Society for Engineering Management (ASEM). She is the ASEM Southwest Regional Director. In addition, Hunter was recently named a McGuire Entrepreneurship Scholar.

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James C. Baygents University of Arizona

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James C. Baygents is the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs in the College of Engineering at yhe University of Arizona. Baygents is a member of the Department of Chemical & Environmental Engineering (ChEE) and the Program in Applied Mathematics at the UA. Baygents joined the UA engineering faculty as an Assistant Professor in 1991, the same year he received a Ph.D. in chemical engineering from Princeton University. He also holds an M.A. (Princeton, 1981) and a B.S. (Rice, 1980) in chemical engineering. For three years prior to joining the UA, Baygents was a Visiting Scientist, then a Research Fellow, at the Space Science Laboratory of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. In 1995, he received the Arizona Mortar Board Senior Honor Society award for outstanding faculty service. In 1997, he was awarded an International Research Fellowship by the National Science Foundation for study at the University of Melbourne. In 2009, he was recognized by ChEE and the College for Excellence at the Student Interface. He is a member of Phi Beta Kappa, Tau Beta Pi, and Phi Lambda Upsilon honor societies, as well as the College of Fellows at Rice University’s Will Rice College. Baygents’s research interests include transport processes in natural and engineered systems; separations and water treatment processes; diffusion-reaction-precipitation in aqueous electrolyte systems; electrokinetic theory, measurements, and separations; electrically driven fluid motion and transport processes, including microfluidics; pattern formation in caves associated with Karst water systems; and industrial water treatment for recycle and re-use.

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Michael Gerard Thompson

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Michael Thompson is a Ph.D. student in chemical education with a focus on engineering education at Purdue University (West Lafayette, Ind.), conducting research on the impact of STEM service-learning on college and high school students. For three years, Thompson served as the developer of research and evaluation strategies for the EPICS High program. He holds a B.S. in biology/chemistry and a M.S. in biochemistry from Purdue University. Thompson’s email: mthompson@purdue.edu.

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Abstract

Early Engineering Through Service-Learning: Adapting A University Model to High SchoolThe challenges of this next century require a new generation of engineering talent. In the United States,interest in engineering has remained flat and many groups within remain underrepresented relative to theoverall population, specifically women and ethnic minorities. Attracting the next generation of diverseengineers requires a diverse set of pre-college experiences to connect diverse pathways leading to anengineering degree. The report from the National Academy of Engineering, Changing the Conversation,called for rethinking how engineering is portrayed to young people and our society at large. To meet thegoals of a diverse population, new and innovative approaches are needed to supplement the traditionalengineering pre-college programs.One exciting pathway that adheres to the recommendations described in the report from the NationalAcademy is the use of service-learning to expose students to design and engineering. Service-learning isa form of experiential learning through the integration of traditional classroom teaching with structuredcommunity service. Service-learning has been well established in many disciplines with positive impactson interest, motivation, student satisfaction, personal success, desire, and retention of students whoparticipated in service-learning projects. It has not been well-integrated into STEM or, more specifically,engineering. Service-learning is pedagogically consistent with literature on the recruitment and retentionof women and other underrepresented groups in science and engineering. At the university level, service-learning programs have shown to attract higher numbers of women and diverse students. Pre-collegeprograms have the potential to attract more diverse students to engineering and engage them in pathwaysthat will lead to degrees in engineering.These benefits have been studied at the higher education level and show promise for pre-college as well.Service-learning connected to engineering has an enormous potential for capitalizing on the wave ofinterest in community engagement among teenagers nationally. While interest in engineering hasremained relatively flat, interest in community service, service-learning and engagement has exploded.Many schools have service-learning or community service requirements, often for the highest diplomas,but rarely are these connected to STEM topics or engineering in particular. Connecting service to ourcommunity with engineering aligns perfectly with the National Academy’s Changing the Conversation.This paper will describe the adaptation of a successful university model to high schools. This model issupported by universities and industry professionals. The program has been disseminated to more than 50schools in 10 states. This paper will highlight high school programs that have been integrated into theschool day and are supported by a large Midwestern university and two large Southwestern universities.The paper will discuss how training and support of teacher can be regionalized. Example projects will bedescribed as well as the academic structure and teacher training processes.Data will be presented including the demographics which include over 40% female students and over30% students from groups traditionally underrepresented in engineering. Data shows that students arebecoming more interested in engineering as a result of their experience in the service-learning programsfor a variety of reasons, including recognition of the connection with engineering and its ability to helppeople.

Oakes, W. C., & Dexter, P., & Hunter, J., & Baygents, J. C., & Thompson, M. G. (2012, June), Early Engineering through Service-learning: Adapting a University Model to High School Paper presented at 2012 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, San Antonio, Texas. https://peer.asee.org/21242

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