Asee peer logo

Effects of High Impact Educational Practices on Engineering and Computer Science Student Participation, Persistence, and Success at Land Grant Universities

Download Paper |

Conference

2021 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access

Location

Virtual Conference

Publication Date

July 26, 2021

Start Date

July 26, 2021

End Date

July 19, 2022

Conference Session

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Tagged Topics

Diversity and NSF Grantees Poster Session

Page Count

7

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/37014

Download Count

76

Request a correction

Paper Authors

biography

Candis S. Claiborn Washington State University

visit author page

Professor Emeritus Candis Claiborn has been at Washington State University since 1991. In 2016, she returned to faculty after serving for 10 years as Dean of the Voiland College of Engineering and Architecture at WSU. Prior to that, she served as interim dean and as associate dean for research and graduate programs. Dr. Claiborn received her PhD in chemical engineering from North Carolina State University in 1991. Her research interests are in atmospheric aerosols, air pollution, and atmosphere-biosphere interactions.

visit author page

biography

Angela Minichiello P.E. Utah State University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-4545-9355

visit author page

Angela Minichiello is an assistant professor in the Department of Engineering Education at Utah State University (USU) and a registered professional mechanical engineer. Her research examines issues of access, diversity, and inclusivity in engineering education. In particular, she is interested in engineering professional formation, problem-solving, and the intersections of online learning and alternative pathways for adult, nontraditional, and veteran undergraduates in engineering.

visit author page

biography

Olusola Adesope Washington State University

visit author page

Dr. Olusola O. Adesope is a Professor of Educational Psychology and a Boeing Distinguished Professor of STEM Education at Washington State University, Pullman. His research is at the intersection of educational psychology, learning sciences, and instructional design and technology. His recent research focuses on the cognitive and pedagogical underpinnings of learning with computer-based multimedia resources; knowledge representation through interactive concept maps; meta-analysis of empirical research, and investigation of instructional principles and assessments in STEM. He is currently a Senior Associate Editor of the Journal of Engineering Education.

visit author page

biography

Ebenezer Rotimi Ewumi Washington State University

visit author page

Ebenezer Ewumi is a Computer Engineering master student at Washington State University. His research is in engineering education and software engineering techniques. His recent research focuses on the effect of high impact practices on engineering and computer science undergraduate student outcomes around academic success and persistence.

visit author page

biography

Muhammad Asghar P.E. Utah State University

visit author page

Muhammad Asghar is a graduate research assistant and a PHD student at Engineering Education Department, Utah State University. He has a master's degree in educational psychology and a bachelor's in computer information systems engineering. His research interests consist of using different technical and non-technical methods to enhance learning processes of engineering students.

visit author page

Download Paper |

Abstract

Effects of High Impact Educational Practices on Engineering and Computer Science Student Participation, Persistence, and Success at Land Grant Universities

Despite ongoing efforts nationwide, student participation, persistence and success remain challenges in engineering and computer science (E/CS) undergraduate degree programs, especially among women and members of groups underrepresented in these fields. Results of the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE), which queries first year and senior college undergraduates across all degree programs, consistently indicate that students who participate in “high impact educational practices” (HIEP), including internships, learning communities, service learning, study abroad, or undergraduate research, experience better outcomes (e.g., persistence, retention) compared to students who do not participate in these activities. It is not clear from these results, however, whether and how participation in HIEP affects student outcomes among E/CS students, particularly those from underrepresented groups.

In September of 2019, we initiated a multi-institutional NSF-funded project to investigate associations, if any, that exist between HIEP and student outcomes for engineering and computer science students at two, predominantly white (one is an emerging Hispanic Serving Institution) western land grant universities. Overall, our research project is guided by the following research questions:

1. To what extent do engineering and computer science students participate in HIEP?; 2. What relationships, if any, exist between engineering and computer science student participation in HIEP and their performance outcomes?; and 3. How do contextual factors (e.g. institutional, personal, social, financial, etc.) affect student awareness, interest, and participation in HIEP?

This two-year project employs a two-phase, explanatory, sequential, mixed-methods approach organized into three phases: (Phase 1) analysis of existing NSSE survey data collected at both institutions; (Phase 2) development and implementation of a HIEP participation survey among current engineering and computer science students at both institutions; and (Phase 3) conduct of focus group interviews among current E/CS students at both institutions to probe survey results and develop deeper understandings about how contextual factors affect HIEP participation, especially among women and members of groups underrepresented.

During Project Year 1, Phase 1 and 2 activities were conducted; analysis of the HIEP survey results is currently ongoing. Early results show that E/CS student participation in HIEP is a predictor of academic success, for the students surveyed, based on a multiple regression model of the survey data. Results further show that, beyond capstone design experiences, E/CS students reported participating in internships (38%) more than, and study abroad (5%) less than, any other HIEP. These results may reflect the professional nature of these disciplines and have implications for the development of globally competent E/CS professionals. During Project Year 2, we will develop the interview protocols and conduct focus group interviews with volunteer survey participants. Overall, this research is poised to provide evidence-based recommendations for implementing HIEP at other similar land grant institutions. Ultimately, we hope that this work will improve engineering and computer science student awareness of, access to, and participation in HIEP across a wide spectrum of student demographic groups and will lead to a more diverse engineering workforce.

Claiborn, C. S., & Minichiello, A., & Adesope, O., & Ewumi, E. R., & Asghar, M. (2021, July), Effects of High Impact Educational Practices on Engineering and Computer Science Student Participation, Persistence, and Success at Land Grant Universities Paper presented at 2021 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access, Virtual Conference. https://peer.asee.org/37014

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2021 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015