Asee peer logo

Embracing Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in Our Classroom and Teaching

Download Paper |

Conference

2021 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access

Location

Virtual Conference

Publication Date

July 26, 2021

Start Date

July 26, 2021

End Date

July 19, 2022

Conference Session

Innovative and Impactful Engineering Leadership Pedagogy

Tagged Division

Engineering Leadership Development

Tagged Topic

Diversity

Page Count

29

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/37024

Download Count

418

Request a correction

Paper Authors

biography

Jena Shafai Asgarpoor University of Nebraska, Lincoln

visit author page

Jena Asgarpoor has been on the faculty at the University of Nebraska – Lincoln since August 2017. She is a Professor of Practice and the Director for the Master of Engineering Management Program in the College of Engineering. Dr. Asgarpoor received her Ph. D. and M.S. in Industrial Engineering, specializing in Engineering Management, from Texas A&M University in College Station, where she had previously earned a B.A. in Political Science (Summa Cum Laude). Prior to UNL, she was a professor at Bellevue University (Bellevue, Nebraska) for 26 years. She is an officer in the Engineering Leadership Development (LEAD) and Engineering Management (EMD) divisions of ASEE, and also active in the American Society for Engineering Management (ASEM).

visit author page

biography

Meg Handley Pennsylvania State University

visit author page

Meg Handley is currently the Associate Director for Engineering Leadership Outreach at Penn State University. Previously, Meg served as the Director of the Career & Corporate Connection's office at the Smeal College of Business at Penn State University. Meg completed her PhD in Workforce Education at Penn State, where she focused on interpersonal behaviors and their impact on engineering leadership potential.

Meg is a board certified coach with experience in developing students' leadership and professional competencies through teaching and one-on-one coaching. She is most interested in developing student knowledge of leadership to impact their successful transition to the workplace.

visit author page

biography

Alisha L. Sarang-Sieminski Franklin W. Olin College of Engineering

visit author page

Dr. Alisha Sarang-Sieminski is an associate dean and a professor of engineering at Olin College. They have taken a winding career path, starting with a BS in chemical engineering from MIT, moving to a PhD in bioengineering from University of Pennsylvania followed by postdoctoral work in the Biological Engineering Division at MIT. They have been at Olin College since 2015, where their work has ranged from bioengineering teaching and research, to running a senior capstone program, to academic leadership. Throughout this, a focus of their work has been to work on issues of equity and inclusion at all levels from offering individual trainings to working for institutional change.

visit author page

biography

John Brooks Slaughter P.E. University of Southern California

visit author page

A former Director of the National Science Foundation, Chancellor of the University of Maryland,
College Park, and President of Occidental College, Dr. Slaughter has served for many years as a
leader in the education, engineering and scientific communities. He is well known for his
commitment to increasing diversity in higher education with a special focus on the STEM
disciplines.
A member of the National Academy of Engineering — where he has served on the Committee on
Minorities in Engineering, co-chaired its Action Forum on Engineering Workforce Diversity and
served two terms on the NAE Council — he is also the recipient of the Academy’s Arthur M.
Bueche Award in 2004. A Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the
Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE), and the American Academy of Arts and
Sciences, he was elected to the Tau Beta Pi honorary Engineering Society and was named Eminent
Member of the Eta Kappa Nu Honorary Electrical Engineering Association. He is a member of Phi
Beta Kappa and in1993, Dr. Slaughter was named to the American Society for Engineering
Education Hall of Fame and was the recipient of the society’s Centennial Medal. He received the
UCLA Medal of Excellence in 1989, was elected to the Kansas State University Engineering Hall of
Fame in 1990, received the Roger Revelle Award from the University of California, San Diego in
1991 and was named that institution’s Alumnus of the Year in 1982.
Dr. Slaughter, a licensed professional engineer, began his career as an electronics engineer at
General Dynamics and, later, served for 15 years at the U.S. Navy Electronics Laboratory in San
Diego, where he became head of the Information Systems Technology Department. He has also
been director of the Applied Physics Laboratory and professor of electrical engineering at the
University of Washington, Academic Vice President and Provost at Washington State University,
the Irving R. Melbo Professor of Leadership in Education at the University of Southern California
and, until his return to USC in January 2010, president and CEO of the National Action Council
for Minorities in Engineering, Inc. (NACME) from August 2000 to September 2009.
Among the boards of directors on which he has served are IBM, Northrop Grumman, Monsanto,
Baltimore Gas and Electric Co., Sovran Bank, Union Bank, Avery Dennison, Atlantic Richfield
(ARCO) and Solutia, Inc. He was appointed by President Jimmy Carter as Assistant Director and,
later, as Director of the National Science Foundation and by President George W. Bush to
membership on the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST).
Dr. Slaughter earned a Ph.D. in Engineering Science from the University of California, San Diego
(UCSD), an M.S. in Engineering from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and a B.S.
in Electrical Engineering from Kansas State University. He holds honorary degrees from 30
colleges and universities. Recipient of the first U.S. Black Engineer of the Year Award in 1987, Dr.
Slaughter was awarded the Martin Luther King Jr. National Award in 1997.
He and his wife, Dr. Ida Bernice Slaughter, herself an educational leader, have two children: a son,
John Brooks Slaughter II, D.V.M., and a daughter, Ms. Jacqueline Michelle Slaughter, a university
administrator and doctoral student in educational administration.

visit author page

biography

Meagan C. Pollock Engineer Inclusion

visit author page

Dr. Meagan Pollock envisions a world where personal and social circumstances are not obstacles to achieving potential, and where kindness, inclusivity, and conservation prevail. As an engineer turned educator for diversity, equity, and inclusion, Meagan focuses on engineering equity into education and the workforce. An international speaker, teacher, engineer, and equity leader, her mission is to provide services, tools, and resources that inspire awareness and initiate action. Learn more at EngineerInclusion.com.

visit author page

biography

Homero Murzi Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0003-3849-2947

visit author page

Homero Murzi is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Engineering Education at Virginia Tech with honorary appointments at the University of Queensland (Australia) and University of Los Andes (Venezuela). He holds degrees in Industrial Engineering (BS, MS), Master of Business Administration (MBA) and Engineering Education (PhD). Homero is the leader of the Engineering Competencies, Learning, and Inclusive Practices for Success (ECLIPS) Lab. His research focuses on contemporary and inclusive pedagogical practices, emotions in engineering, competency development, and understanding the experiences of Latinx and Native Americans in engineering from an asset-based perspective. Homero has been recognized as a Diggs Teaching Scholar, a Graduate Academy for Teaching Excellence Fellow, a Global Perspectives Fellow, a Diversity Scholar, a Fulbright Scholar, and was inducted in the Bouchet Honor Society.

visit author page

biography

Monica Farmer Cox Ohio State University

visit author page

Monica F. Cox, Ph.D., is Professor in the Department of Engineering Education at The Ohio State University. Prior to this appointment, she was an Associate Professor in the School of Engineering Education at Purdue University, the Inaugural Director of the College of Engineering's Leadership Minor, and the Director of the International Institute of Engineering Education Assessment (i2e2a). In 2013, she became founder and owner of STEMinent LLC, a company focused on STEM education assessment and professional development for stakeholders in K-12 education, higher education, and Corporate America. Her research is focused upon the use of mixed methodologies to explore significant research questions in undergraduate, graduate, and professional engineering education, to integrate concepts from higher education and learning science into engineering education, and to develop and disseminate reliable and valid assessment tools for use across the engineering education continuum.

visit author page

Download Paper |

Abstract

Recent events have brought to light the gravity of the challenges that our society faces today relative to systemic racism and its impact on equity and access in our society. Marginalized groups face daily micro-aggressions and bias due to the impacts of systemic racism. Recently, the NAE hosted their annual meeting and included a keynote speaker, Dr. John Slaughter, who has committed his life’s work to dismantling racism specifically in engineering education. Dr. Slaughter called the organization and members to recognize the challenges that systemic racism poses for the engineering field and to take action in changing the way our students are educated. Dr. Slaughter pointed out that without an inclusive engineering workforce, we are missing viable and important solutions to engineering problems. As engineering leadership educators, our obligation to our students extends beyond transmission of technical knowledge. We have a responsibility to infuse our curriculum with knowledge of systemic racism, how bias can impact our solutions, and how engineers can lead and create teams that foster belonging and inclusivity. The fabric of our society has become fragile and is breaking apart, rapidly. We must help engineering leadership students develop a growth mindset and discover the sophistication of mind to celebrate diversity, equity, and inclusion in their daily lives, school, and workplace. This requires us to consider inclusive leadership as a foundational approach to engineering leadership development. Inclusive leadership has been shown to positively impact team performance, decision-making, collaboration, innovation, and motivation. Inclusive leaders celebrate differences and recognize and challenge attacks on DEI. As engineering leadership educators, we must lead by example, model inclusive leadership behavior, and have courage to infuse these concepts into our curriculum. This paper assembles the collective thoughts, perspectives, insights, and experiences of a distinguished panel of educators and scholars on embracing diversity, equity, and inclusion in the classroom and teaching practices. The panel brings together people from multiple universities, different stages of their career, with interests in various areas related to DEI. It includes John Slaughter who has devoted his life to combatting racism, to scholars whose research is dedicated to teaching about DEI and creating a work environment that values DEI, and educators who have found creative ways to incorporate DEI in their instruction of engineering courses. The panel and this paper will have recommendations on why it is important to welcome DEI in our workplace and in our classrooms, how to embrace DEI in designing and delivering our courses, and teaching strategies to celebrate and support DEI as we prepare students for the workforce.

Asgarpoor, J. S., & Handley, M., & Sarang-Sieminski, A. L., & Slaughter, J. B., & Pollock, M. C., & Murzi, H., & Cox, M. F. (2021, July), Embracing Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in Our Classroom and Teaching Paper presented at 2021 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access, Virtual Conference. https://peer.asee.org/37024

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2021 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015