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Engineering Design: A Water Wheel Challenge for 3-8 Educators

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Conference

2015 ASEE Workshop on K-12 Engineering Education

Location

Seattle, Washington

Publication Date

June 13, 2015

Start Date

June 13, 2015

End Date

June 13, 2015

Page Count

12

Page Numbers

18.12.1 - 18.12.12

DOI

10.18260/1-2--17111

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/17111

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685

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Paper Authors

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Adam Kirn University of Nevada, Reno Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0001-6344-5072

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David T Crowther University of Nevada, Reno

biography

Melissa Ann Jurkiewicz University of Nevada

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Melissa Jurkiewicz is an Assistant Professor of Secondary Science Education at UNR. Her research focuses on teachers’ formative assessment practices in a variety of contexts within science classrooms. Her education includes a B.S. in Biology and a M.A.T. in secondary science education from the University of South Carolina and a Ph.D. in Science Education from the University of Georgia.

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Abstract

WORKSHOP PROPOSAL FORM 2015 Annual ASEE K-12 Workshop on Engineering Education “Authentic Engineering: Representing & Emphasizing the E in STEM” Presented by Dassault Systems Saturday, June 13, 2015 8:00 A.M. – 5:00 P.M. Sheraton Seattle | Seattle | WAPlease complete this form, save it as a PDF file only and upload it through the ASEE PaperManagement system as shown in the K12 Workshop Presenter’s Kit.All notifications will be by email from the ASEE Paper Management system.NOTE: To ensure that emails are not obstructed by spam blockers, please make sure to WHITELIST theemail addresses: monolith@asee.org and conferences@asee.org and s.harrington-hurd@asee.org.Direct questions to Stephanie Harrington-Hurd, ASEE K-12 Activities Manager, at s.harrington-hurd@asee.org. Additional workshop details are available at: http://www.asee.org/K12Workshop.Thank you! Deadline Friday, January 23, 2015 by 5:00PM EST Presenters will be notified of acceptance status by March 14. Late submissions will not be accepted. Advanced Workshop Registration will open December 6, 2013.ASEE 2015-K12-Proposal-Final Page 1 of 11 WORKSHOP PROPOSAL FORM 2015 Annual ASEE K-12 Workshop on Engineering Education “Authentic Engineering: Representing & Emphasizing the E in STEM” Presented by Dassault Systems Saturday, June 13, 2015 8:00 A.M. – 5:00 P.M. Sheraton Seattle | Seattle | WA SUBMISSION INFORMATIONProvide the first and last name of each presenter, including affiliations. If there is more than onepresenter, designate one person as the organizer and provide only that person’s contactinformation. The organizer is responsible for communicating to co-presenters.Number of Presenters: 3Presenter Name(s):1) Last Kirn First Adam Affiliation University of Nevada, Reno (UNR)2) Last Jurkiewicz First Melissa Affiliation University of Nevada, Reno3) Last Crowther First David Affiliation University of Nevada, RenoContact Person’s Name: Adam KirnContact Person’s Email: akirn@unr.eduContact Person’s Phone: 775-682-7567Contact Person’s Alternate Phone: 864-508-1644Please provide a one-paragraph bio for each presenter (in the order listed above). The bio shouldnot exceed 70 words and should be written as you would want it to appear on the ASEE websiteand program materials.ASEE 2015-K12-Proposal-Final Page 2 of 11 WORKSHOP PROPOSAL FORM 2015 Annual ASEE K-12 Workshop on Engineering Education “Authentic Engineering: Representing & Emphasizing the E in STEM” Presented by Dassault Systems Saturday, June 13, 2015 8:00 A.M. – 5:00 P.M. Sheraton Seattle | Seattle | WA1) Adam Kirn is an Assistant Professor of Engineering Education at UNR. His research focuseson the interactions between engineering cultures, student motivation, and learning experiences.His projects involve studying student perceptions, beliefs and attitudes towards becomingengineers, problem solving processes, and cultural fit. His education includes a B.S. inBiomedical Engineering from Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, a M.S. in Bioengineeringand Ph.D. in Engineering and Science Education from Clemson University.2) Melissa Jurkiewicz is an Assistant Professor of Secondary Science Education at UNR. Herresearch focuses on teachers’ formative assessment practices in a variety of contexts withinscience classrooms. Her education includes a B.S. in Biology and a M.A.T. in secondary scienceeducation from the University of South Carolina and a Ph.D. in Science Education from theUniversity of Georgia.3) David Crowther is the Executive Director for the Raggio Research Center for STEMEducation and Professor of Science Education at UNR. Dr. Crowther has research interests inSTEM Education, Inquiry based teaching / learning, and using science for English LanguageLearners to develop academic language. Dr Crowther has a B.S. and MEd in Education fromBrigham Young University and a PhD in Science Education from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. WORKSHOP INFORMATIONProposed Title:Engineering Design: A Water Wheel Challenge for 3-8 EducatorsAbstract: Please provide a concise description that includes the workshop’s learning objectives(maximum 750 characters). The abstract is used on the ASEE website, program materials, andotherK-12 Workshop promotional activities.ASEE 2015-K12-Proposal-Final Page 3 of 11 WORKSHOP PROPOSAL FORM 2015 Annual ASEE K-12 Workshop on Engineering Education “Authentic Engineering: Representing & Emphasizing the E in STEM” Presented by Dassault Systems Saturday, June 13, 2015 8:00 A.M. – 5:00 P.M. Sheraton Seattle | Seattle | WAParticipants of this workshop will identify myths related to who can be an engineer and who canteach about engineering. Then, participants will engage in an interactive lesson that can beimplemented in a 3-8 setting. The interactive lesson will engage participants in the engineeringdesign process in order to solve a design challenge. The participants will explore potential andkinetic energy while working in a team to design and build an interactive water wheel that liftsthe most weight.Workshop Description. Please provide a detailed description of the proposed workshop that, atminimum, explicitly addresses the following (maximum 4,000 characters):This workshop will engage science and engineering educators with an integrated STEM lessonthat will support the development of science and mathematics content using the EngineeringDesign Process (EDP) and related Science and Engineering practices for elementary and middleschool students.This workshop has two learning objectives:  Participants will examine data in order to dispel myths related to the field of engineering.  Participants will be exposed to an effective 3-8 grade lesson on engineering design through engaging in the Water Wheel Challenge.The presentation team will begin by facilitating a group discussion aimed at identifyingpersistent myths about who can be an engineer and/or implement engineering lessons. Thisactivity is described in detail in the diversity section below.Then, the Water Wheel Challenge lesson will be modeled for the participants. The lesson hasthree learning objectives for elementary and middle school students:  Students will explore the conversion of potential to kinetic energy.  Students will design and build an interactive water wheel that will lift weight.  Students will engage in the engineering design process to solve the design challenge.ASEE 2015-K12-Proposal-Final Page 4 of 11 WORKSHOP PROPOSAL FORM 2015 Annual ASEE K-12 Workshop on Engineering Education “Authentic Engineering: Representing & Emphasizing the E in STEM” Presented by Dassault Systems Saturday, June 13, 2015 8:00 A.M. – 5:00 P.M. Sheraton Seattle | Seattle | WADuring the lesson, the presentation team will begin by discussing the Engineering DesignProcess as applicable to this challenge. The participants will also learn about the history, use,and function of water wheels. Then, they will work in teams to brainstorm, design, and build awater wheel that is capable of lifting the most weight when rice is poured across the water wheeland keep to a materials budget as outlined in the challenge. Metal washers will be used asweights. They will be instructed to draw both their initial design concept and their finalconstruction, as well as any and all modifications throughout the design process. A tarp will bespread across the floor and rice will be used instead of water in order to prevent making a mess.They will utilize various inexpensive household items including paper plates, paper cups,drinking straws, plastic spoons, string, and masking tape. Once the groups have completed theirwater wheels, they will be tested and the amount of weight that each wheel can lift will bemeasured on a scale. The participants will examine the science behind the water wheel and inparticular, focus on potential and kinetic energy and will participate in general mathematics for aproject budget and graphing success of weight lifted per iteration. Lastly, the teams will revisetheir water wheel designs. The teams will test their water wheels one final time and attempt tolift more weight than before. The presentation team will conclude the water wheel activity witha discussion of potential variations to the lesson. For example, a teacher could attach nominalcosts to each material and require each team to build a water wheel within a specific budget.The participants will receive a hard copy of the water wheel lesson plan aligned to the NextGeneration Science Standards and participants will be able to keep their own water wheel design.The practical application for teachers and outreach staff is that they will learn to implementengineering design in the classroom using effective science teaching pedagogies that align withthe Next Generation Science Standards. In addition, the workshop will provide teachers with ameans to foster the development of problem solving and critical thinking skills while meetingother state standards related to kinetic and potential energy.ASEE 2015-K12-Proposal-Final Page 5 of 11 WORKSHOP PROPOSAL FORM 2015 Annual ASEE K-12 Workshop on Engineering Education “Authentic Engineering: Representing & Emphasizing the E in STEM” Presented by Dassault Systems Saturday, June 13, 2015 8:00 A.M. – 5:00 P.M. Sheraton Seattle | Seattle | WAAuthentic Engineering Connection. Identify and describe how you will explicitly address theways in which your lesson or activity is representative of the processes, habits of mind andpractices used by engineers, or is demonstrative of work in specific engineering fields.i At leastone of those must be within the first four listed, below; i.e., do not only check “other”. Check allthat apply: Use of an engineering design process that has at least one iteration/improvement Attention to specific engineering habits of mind Attention to engineering practices (as described in the NGSS/Framework and as practiced by engineers) Attention to specific engineering careers or fields related to the lesson/activity Other (please describe below)Provide a description of how you will explicitly address these aspects of authentic engineering inyour workshop (maximum 2,000 characters):The initial design and construction of the water wheel is geared toward construction of an objectthat will lift the most weight. This initial foray through process will be guided by thepresentation team. After this initial design participants will be asked to improve on the efficiencyof their water wheel in a less guided manner such that teachers develop self-confidence andownership of the engineering design process. Once teams have reached a point where they aresatisfied with their designs the presentation team has five variations on this lesson that may beimplemented, if time allows, for another revision of the product given new information. Thesevariations include creating a cost for materials and having participants purchase their materials;having participants design the most inexpensive water wheel that lifts the most weight; havingASEE 2015-K12-Proposal-Final Page 6 of 11 WORKSHOP PROPOSAL FORM 2015 Annual ASEE K-12 Workshop on Engineering Education “Authentic Engineering: Representing & Emphasizing the E in STEM” Presented by Dassault Systems Saturday, June 13, 2015 8:00 A.M. – 5:00 P.M. Sheraton Seattle | Seattle | WAparticipants design a water wheel for under a set amount that lifts the most; giving all teams thesame materials and all students to buy or trade/barter maters from/with other teams; and givingsome teams bags with missing materials, other teams receive bags with extra materials, andteams must trade or purchase materials from other teams in order to build a water wheel.This work will address explicitly address the following two standards from the NGSS: Engineering Design (Grades 3-5)  ETS1-1. Define a simple design problem reflecting a need or want that includes specific criteria for success and constraints on materials, time, and cost. Engineering Design (Middle School)  ETS1-1. Define the criteria and constraints of a design problem with sufficient precision to ensure a successful solution, taking into account relevant scientific principles and potential impacts on people and the natural environment that may limit possible solutions.Diversity. This year is the American Society for Engineering Education’s “Year of Action onDiversity.” It is essential that we have a diverse engineering workforce to solve diverseproblems. To do that and to have an engineering-literate public, it is essential that we reach everypreK-12 student with high-quality engineering education, drawing on issues of access and equityin the classroom and in the curriculum. Reviewers would like to know how your proposedworkshop will address diversity.Provide a description of how you will explicitly address diversity – e.g., diversity with respect togender/sex, ethnicity or race, special education inclusion, socio-economic status, or LGBT status– in your workshop (maximum 2,000 characters):To address diversity in engineering, the research team will leverage the funded NSF projectsrelated to students with non-normative identities in the cultures of engineering. This workASEE 2015-K12-Proposal-Final Page 7 of 11 WORKSHOP PROPOSAL FORM 2015 Annual ASEE K-12 Workshop on Engineering Education “Authentic Engineering: Representing & Emphasizing the E in STEM” Presented by Dassault Systems Saturday, June 13, 2015 8:00 A.M. – 5:00 P.M. Sheraton Seattle | Seattle | WAfocuses on how students who do not fall within in the dominant cultures of engineering navigatethese cultures and either succeed or decide to leave. The team has previously asked pre-serviceand in-service about their perceptions of engineering, and used these perceptions as a means toguide conversation aimed at busting persistent myths in engineering (e.g. women need moremath and science skills to succeed, all engineering requires a physical build, and there are groupsof individuals that will not be successful in engineering). This same model will be followed forthis workshop during the initial introductory period. The conversations will pull in the results ofresearch from this team as well as the established body of literature related to diverse groupspursuit of engineering degrees.The water wheel project also fosters diversity through the inclusion of educational groups whooften feel excluded from due to perceptions of high cost. This project was intentionally designedto rely on a limited number of resources that are all lost cost. The materials used in this projectrequire no special classroom setups or infrastructure improvements. The use of low costmaterials opens up low socioeconomic status schools and provides and avenue for students oflimited means to explore engineering and engineering concepts. During the completion of thewater wheel project the presentation team will take time to address issues in teaming related togender and minority status of students and provide instructors with tools that can be used tocombat students taking or being forced into stereotypical roles.Are there any online components to the proposal or presentation? (Note that these onlinecomponents may only be available to presenters or those who have their wireless subscriptions,since wireless may not be available during the workshop sessions.) No YesASEE 2015-K12-Proposal-Final Page 8 of 11 WORKSHOP PROPOSAL FORM 2015 Annual ASEE K-12 Workshop on Engineering Education “Authentic Engineering: Representing & Emphasizing the E in STEM” Presented by Dassault Systems Saturday, June 13, 2015 8:00 A.M. – 5:00 P.M. Sheraton Seattle | Seattle | WA Please describe:Grade Level Target Audience (check all that apply): Primary (EC–2) Elementary (3–5) Middle School (6-8) High School (9-12)Maximum Number of Participants:20 If this number is greater than 25, please describe how your workshop will equally engage all participants.All Seating is Classroom (tables and chairs).ASEE 2015-K12-Proposal-Final Page 9 of 11 WORKSHOP PROPOSAL FORM 2015 Annual ASEE K-12 Workshop on Engineering Education “Authentic Engineering: Representing & Emphasizing the E in STEM” Presented by Dassault Systems Saturday, June 13, 2015 8:00 A.M. – 5:00 P.M. Sheraton Seattle | Seattle | WAAudio Visual Equipment Requests:Note: An LCD projector, screen and podium with attached microphone are provided. Requestsfor additional equipment or resources (e.g., internet connection or laptops) will incur extracharges. If you do not have additional requests, please indicate with “Not applicable.”Not applicable Reminder:Presenters must register and pay the registration fee to support their workshop attendance and audio/video costs. Thank you for completing this proposal form! Please review this document prior to submitting it to ensure that all items are complete. ASEE USE ONLYASEE 2015-K12-Proposal-Final Page 10 of 11 WORKSHOP PROPOSAL FORM 2015 Annual ASEE K-12 Workshop on Engineering Education “Authentic Engineering: Representing & Emphasizing the E in STEM” Presented by Dassault Systems Saturday, June 13, 2015 8:00 A.M. – 5:00 P.M. Sheraton Seattle | Seattle | WADate Received:Received By:Proposal ID Number:ASEE 2015-K12-Proposal-Final Page 11 of 11

Kirn, A., & Crowther, D. T., & Jurkiewicz, M. A. (2015, June), Engineering Design: A Water Wheel Challenge for 3-8 Educators Paper presented at 2015 ASEE Workshop on K-12 Engineering Education, Seattle, Washington. 10.18260/1-2--17111

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