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Exploring the Relationships Between Resilience and Student Performance in an Engineering Statics Class: A Work in Progress

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Conference

2018 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Salt Lake City, Utah

Publication Date

June 23, 2018

Start Date

June 23, 2018

End Date

July 27, 2018

Conference Session

Curriculum and Instruction in Engineering Mechanics

Tagged Division

Mechanics

Tagged Topic

Diversity

Page Count

15

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/30501

Download Count

20

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Paper Authors

biography

Peter H. Carnell P.E. University of Georgia

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Peter Carnell is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Georgia. He has been a licensed professional engineer for over 20 years and seeks ways to bring his work experience into the classroom. He has taught at UGA for 4 years and prior to that taught at Georgia Tech for 8 years. His areas of interest include mechanics, design and engineering education.

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biography

Nathaniel J. Hunsu University of Georgia

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Nathaniel Hunsu is currently an assistant professor of engineering education at the University of Georgia. He is affiliated with the Engineering Education Transformational Institute and the school electrical and computer engineering at the university. He holds a Bachelor’s degree in electronic and computer engineering from the Lagos State University in Nigeria, a Masters in Project management from the University of Sunderland, and a PhD in Educational Psychology from Washington State University. His research interests include learning and cognition, students’ engagement, and the assessment of learning and students engagements, in engineering classrooms. His expertise also include the development and validation of measurement inventories, systematic reviews and meta-analysis, and quantitative research designs.

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Davis F. Ray University of Georgia

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Passionate about bringing lasting change to the built environment, I desire to learn more about sustainable systems through an economic lens that will enable clean solutions for the future. I am currently studying for my BS in mechanical engineering, and in the coming years, I will be pursuing my MS in environmental economics to build on my understanding of economic theory and its application to sustainable business models, specifically in the renewables sector. Moving towards this, I serve as an Undergraduate Researcher within the Engineering Education Transformations Institute, a funded educational development program that seeks to promote diversity and improve transdisciplinary collaboration within the college. Specifically, I serve on the Resilience in Engineering Education Project team aimed to investigate the effects that students' resilience and professional skills have on exam performance in technical courses.

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Nicola W. Sochacka University of Georgia

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Nicola W. Sochacka is the Associate Director of the Engineering Education Transformations Institute (EETI) in the College of Engineering at the University of Georgia. Dr. Sochacka’s research interests span interpretive research methods, STEAM (STEM + Art) education, empathy, diversity, and reflection. She holds a Ph.D. in Engineering Epistemologies and a Bachelor of Environmental Engineering from the University of Queensland.

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Abstract

Prior studies have identified the importance of resilience to success both in life and in the workplace. Resilience is also a valued professional skill for academic achievement and student retention in cognitively demanding disciplines such as engineering. However, only limited efforts have been made to characterize how resilience impacts the academic engagement, performance, and retention of engineering students. This study is the first in a program of studies that will map academic resilience, through the measurement of “protective factors” such as optimism and adaptability, with academic performance, as well as identify students at risk of dropping out of their engineering major. In this exploratory study, we examined differences in a group of engineering students on four resilience measures. Participants included 111 engineering students enrolled in six sections of statics taught by one instructor. Participants completed the Psychometric Project Resilience Scale (PPRS) survey online as well as the academic performance requirements for the course. The 50-item instrument surveyed students on five constructs indicative of resilience: adaptability; self-sufficiency; self-control; optimism; and persistence. Learning performance was based on three mid-examinations intended to assess students’ knowledge of the course. The psychometric properties of the instrument used to assess resilience factors were examined and student groups were compared on resilience and performance measures. Results of the study showed that transfer students seemed to struggle more with resilience and academic performance. Differences between gender and race groups in terms of resilience and academic performance were insignificant. Implications of study findings and direction for future studies of resilience among engineering students are discussed.

Carnell P.E., P. H., & Hunsu, N. J., & Ray, D. F., & Sochacka, N. W. (2018, June), Exploring the Relationships Between Resilience and Student Performance in an Engineering Statics Class: A Work in Progress Paper presented at 2018 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition , Salt Lake City, Utah. https://peer.asee.org/30501

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