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Following in the Footsteps of Distinguished Leaders in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM): Narratives of the Next Generation of Young People Preserving key Oral Histories of our Societal History

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Conference

2017 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Columbus, Ohio

Publication Date

June 24, 2017

Start Date

June 24, 2017

End Date

June 28, 2017

Conference Session

Women in Engineering Division Technical Session 7

Tagged Division

Women in Engineering

Tagged Topic

Diversity

Page Count

33

DOI

10.18260/1-2--28377

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/28377

Download Count

245

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Paper Authors

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Kelsey Morgan Irvin University of Missouri, Columbia

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Kelsey Irvin is a Clinical Psychology Ph.D. Candidate at the University of Missouri, Columbia. She is studying youth emotion dysregulation and how its physiological presentation correlates to depression.

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Elizabeth Hiteshue Bain & Company

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Elizabeth graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in May 2015 with a degree in Systems Engineering. During two of her undergraduate years, she worked with Dr. Lanzerotti and Kelsey Irvin on the Oral History Project. Elizabeth currently works as an Associate Consultant at Bain & Company.

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Samantha Laurel Swanson

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Caroline Missouri Wochnick Augsburg College

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Hannah Bech AmeriCorps VISTA

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Hannah Bech graduated Summa Cum Laude from Augsburg College in 2016, studying Sociology with a minor in Gender, Sexuality and Women's Studies. She completing a year of service with AmeriCorps VISTA as the Community Engagement Specialist at Venture Academy, a 6-9 public charter school in Minneapolis.

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Amanda Marie Kapetanakis Augsburg College Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0003-0009-7386

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Amanda Kapetanakis is a junior at Augsburg College, majoring in Biology. She recently finished an internship at Walt Disney World. This semester, she is currently doing research on complex signal processing along with the oral history project. Outside of working on these research projects, she spends her time shadowing different Dental offices, and volunteering at the Animal Humane Society and Hennepin County Medical Center. She is currently preparing to apply to dental school, and plans to become a general dentist, or specialize to become an orthodontist. After gaining enough experience in the field, she hopes to open her own practice.

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Mary Yvonne Lanzerotti Air Force Institute of Technology Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0001-7802-1117

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Dr. Lanzerotti is an Assistant Professor of Physics at Augsburg College (Minneapolis, MN), an Adjunct Associate Professor of Computer Engineering in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the Air Force Institute of Technology, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, and an Affiliate Researcher at the University of Minnesota (Minneapolis, MN). She received her A.B. summa cum laude from Harvard College, M. Phil. from University of Cambridge (U.K.), and her Ph.D. from Cornell University, all in physics.

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Derrick Langley Space and Missile Center, Enterprise Ground Services Office (SMC/ADZS)

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Derrick Langley is the Systems Engineering Branch Chief for the Space and Missile Center, Enterprise Ground Services Office (SMC/ADZS), Los Angeles Air Force Base (AFB), California. He received his B.S. in electrical engineering from the University of Central Florida in 2003, his M.S. in electrical engineering from Wright State University in 2007, and his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from AFIT, Wright-Patterson AFB in 2012. His current research interests are metamaterials, microelectronics, microelectromechanical systems and nanotechnology. He manages system prototyping and developmental efforts for the Air Force Space Command Enterprise Ground Services.

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Michael Geselowitz IEEE History Center at Stevens Institute of Technology

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Michael N. Geselowitz is the senior director of the IEEE History Center, a joint program of IEEE Inc. and Stevens Institute of Technology. Through this arrangement, he is also industry associate professor of the history of technology at Stevens

Geselowitz holds B.S. degrees in electrical engineering and in anthropology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in anthropology from Harvard University. His focus has been on the role of history and social relations of engineering and technology at all levels. He has worked as an electronics engineer for the Department of Defense and held teaching and research positions relating to the social study of technology at M.I.T., Harvard, and Yale University, including a stint as assistant collections manager/curator at Harvard's Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology. Immediately prior to joining IEEE in 1997, Geselowitz was group manager at Eric Marder Associates, a New York market research firm, where he supervised Ph.D. scientists and social scientists undertaking market analyses for Fortune 500 high-tech companies. He is also a registered Patent Agent.

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MaryAnn C. Hellrigel IEEE, IEEE History Center Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-7698-8006

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Since January 2016, I have been the Institutional Historian and Archivist at the IEEE History Center based at Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, New Jersey. Before joining IEEE, I held faculty post teaching history of technology, science, and medicine as well as U.S., European, and world history courses at research universities and liberal arts colleges. I earned a doctorate from Case Western Reserve University's Program in the History of Technology and Science (Ph.D., 1997).

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Gregory Alan Good American Institute of Physics

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BS in Physics, MA and PhD in History of Science. I taught history of science at West Virginia University for 25 years. I am now Director, Center for History of Physics, at the American Institute of Physics.

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Abstract

This project chronicles the oral histories of living female leaders in science, technology, and mathematics in the early part of the 21st century by female students at the very early stages of their careers. It is important to chronicle the histories of these leaders because they are identified by our students as role models in the careers the students are considering. The value that their perspectives bring to the field of oral history is a unique set of one-on-one conversations with students who have selected them from national databases of STEM leaders. Additionally the leaders provide previously unprecedented mentorship and perspectives into their life stories in science. Currently starting its fifth year, the goal of this project is to add to the body of knowledge of oral history by collecting oral histories of women in physics and engineering whose career paths span leadership roles in industry, government, and academia.

This project is a collaboration of six female undergraduates at four academic institutions of higher education, IEEE History Center, and American Institute of Physics (AIP) Center for the History of Physics. We are excited that in June 2015 and June 2016, the first three participating students graduated with a STEM degree. Interviews collected in this project are previously published on the IEEE Engineering Technology and History Wiki (ETHW). Following the oral history interviews, the students write reflections to answer the following three research questions (RQ). RQ#1 is “What are the key factors that led to the success of the distinguished leaders?.” RQ#2 is “What are the crucial skills that enabled their success?.” RQ#3 is “What is the impact on my career path?”

One objective of this paper is for the participating female students, who are majoring in STEM fields, to present their reflections on the three research questions. A second objective is for the students to describe the impact, if any, that carrying out interviews of distinguished STEM leaders has had on their career paths. This paper presents new contributions from three participating students as well as additional contributions from two students who have published preliminary results previously.

Irvin, K. M., & Hiteshue, E., & Swanson, S. L., & Wochnick, C. M., & Bech, H., & Kapetanakis, A. M., & Lanzerotti, M. Y., & Langley, D., & Geselowitz, M., & Hellrigel, M. C., & Good, G. A. (2017, June), Following in the Footsteps of Distinguished Leaders in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM): Narratives of the Next Generation of Young People Preserving key Oral Histories of our Societal History Paper presented at 2017 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Columbus, Ohio. 10.18260/1-2--28377

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