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Gender Differences in Students’ Team Expectations and Experiences in Introductory Team-based Courses

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Conference

2020 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access

Location

Virtual On line

Publication Date

June 22, 2020

Start Date

June 22, 2020

End Date

June 26, 2021

Conference Session

Student Division Technical Session 3

Tagged Division

Student

Tagged Topic

Diversity

Page Count

11

DOI

10.18260/1-2--34702

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/34702

Download Count

398

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Paper Authors

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Margaret Carroll

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James A. Coller University of Michigan Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0003-3825-923X

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James Coller is an engineering PhD Candidate at the University of Michigan focusing on the development of a novel multi-layer network approach to understanding design complexity in unmanned maritime vehicles. James also completed his BSE and MSE in Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering in 2017 and 2018 respectively and a MS in Robotics in 2019 at Michigan. His research interests include autonomous robotics for both land and marine environments, ship design for the U.S. Navy, and improving equity and inclusion in engineering learning environments.

James spent three years during his undergraduate education as an instructional aide for the design-build-test-communicate course described within this paper. Since leaving the instructional staff, James continues to work with the course to research educational methods. James is also an occasional guest lecturer for this course teaching about field robotics and team communication challenges.

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Laura K. Alford University of Michigan

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Laura K. Alford is a Lecturer and Research Investigator at the University of Michigan. She researches ways to use data-informed analysis of students' performance and perceptions of classroom environment to support DEI-based curricula improvements.

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Roxanne Pinsky University of Michigan

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Charles William Schertzing University of Michigan

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Julia T. Toye University of Michigan

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Magel P. Su California Institute of Technology Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0003-4898-5024

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Magel P. Su is a PhD student in the Department of Applied Physics and Materials Science at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Professor Harry Atwater. He has a B.S.E in materials science and engineering and a minor in chemistry from the University of Michigan. At Michigan, he was a member of the Ultrafast Laser - Material Interaction Laboratory and the Engineering Honors Program. He also served as an instructor for several courses including Introduction to Engineering, Introduction to Materials and Manufacturing, and Structural and Chemical Characterization of Materials.

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Robin Fowler University of Michigan

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Robin Fowler is a lecturer in the Program in Technical Communication at the University of Michigan. She enjoys serving as a "communication coach" to students throughout the curriculum, and she's especially excited to work with first year and senior students, as well as engineering project teams, as they navigate the more open-ended communication decisions involved in describing the products of open-ended design scenarios.

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Sangam Munsiff University of Michigan

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Abstract

Keywords: team-based learning, team expectations, gender differences, team experiences, team behaviors This paper is student-led engineering education research on gender differences in student responses to experience working on teams in an introductory engineering course. We are past and present teaching assistants for a team-based, project-based introductory engineering course at a large midwestern research university. We strive to create and maintain an equitable and inclusive environment so that our diverse students can succeed. We regularly assess our students’ perceptions of their team experience, but we are aware that some social groups can be at a disadvantage when it comes to teamwork. We chose to look at gender in this particular project. There are many examples in the engineering education literature of teamwork being particularly fraught for women. Specifically, women sometimes end up completing less technical work and more project management work [1-3]; they are sometimes spoken over in conversations [4,5]; and they are sometimes evaluated by themselves and their peers according to different standards than their male peers [6-10]. For our assessment of students’ team experiences, we rely on an online team support tool hosted by our institution. To better use this tool and provide more inclusive support for our teams, we want to investigate the effects of gender on student reporting of team experiences. Our research questions are: Is there a main effect of gender on student responses to questions on task orientation, work preferences, and concerns about teamwork as assessed at the beginning of the term and at the end of the term? Is there a main effect of gender on self-reported and peer-reported teamwork behaviors in the class as assessed at the midpoint of the term and at the end of the term? Our data set is gathered by the online team support tool hosted by our institution and is approved under [IRB # REDACTED]. Our primary data set is from two semesters of a team-based, project-based introductory engineering course (N = ~120); for context, we will compare the responses in this data set to the responses from an introductory business course (N = ~600). The results and analysis will be presented in this paper.

[1] Linder, B., Somerville, M., Eris, Ö., & Tatar, N. (2010, October). Work in progress—Taking one for the team: Goal orientation and gender-correlated task division. In 2010 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE) (pp. F4H-1). IEEE. [2] Meadows, L. A., & Sekaquaptewa, D. (2013). The influence of gender stereotypes on role adoption in student teams. In Proc. 120th ASEE Annual Conf. Exposition (pp. 1-16). Washington, DC: American Society of Engineering Education. [3] Strehl, E. A., & Fowler, R. (2019). Experimental Evidence Regarding Gendered Task Allocation on Teams. In Proc 126th ASEE Annual Conf. Exposition (pp. 1-14). Tampa, FL: American Society of Engineering Education. [4] Scanlon, E. (2000). How gender influences learners working collaboratively with science simulations. Learning and Instruction, 10(6), 463-481. [5] Eggert, R., Joshi, A., Mehrotra, S., Zastavker, Y. V., & Darer, V. (2014, October). Using discourse analysis to understand" failure modes" of undergraduate engineering teams. In 2014 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE) Proceedings (pp. 1-5). IEEE. [6] Bohnet, I., Van Geen, A., & Bazerman, M. (2015). When performance trumps gender bias: Joint vs. separate evaluation. Management Science, 62(5), 1225-1234. [7] Stonewall, J., Dorneich, M. C., Rongerude, J., & Dorius, C. (2018, April). A Review of Bias in Peer Assessment. In Collaborative Network for Engineering and Computing Diversity (CoNECD) Conference, Crystal City, VA. [8] Main, J. B., & Sanchez-Pena, M. (2015, October). Student evaluations of team members: Is there gender bias?. In 2015 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE) (pp. 1-6). IEEE. [9] Ostafichuk, P. M., d’Entremont, A., Shirzad, N., & Sibley, J. Gender and Personality Type Influence in Peer Evaluation. In Proc. of ASEE 2015 Conf (pp. 15-17). [10] Fowler, R. Demographic effects on student-reported satisfaction with teams and teammates in a first-year, team-based, problem-based course. In Proc. of ASEE 2016 Conf.

Carroll, M., & Coller, J. A., & Alford, L. K., & Pinsky, R., & Schertzing, C. W., & Toye, J. T., & Su, M. P., & Fowler, R., & Munsiff, S. (2020, June), Gender Differences in Students’ Team Expectations and Experiences in Introductory Team-based Courses Paper presented at 2020 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access, Virtual On line . 10.18260/1-2--34702

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