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Hands-on, Screens-on, and Brains-on Activities for Important Concepts in Heat Transfer

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Conference

2016 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

New Orleans, Louisiana

Publication Date

June 26, 2016

Start Date

June 26, 2016

End Date

August 28, 2016

ISBN

978-0-692-68565-5

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

New Pedagogical Approaches in Chemical Engineering

Tagged Division

Chemical Engineering

Page Count

10

DOI

10.18260/p.25449

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/25449

Download Count

102

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Paper Authors

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Margot A Vigeant Bucknell University

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Margot Vigeant is a professor of chemical engineering and an associate dean of engineering at Bucknell University. She earned her B.S. in chemical engineering from Cornell University, and her M.S. and Ph.D., also in chemical engineering, from the University of Virginia. Her primary research focus is on engineering pedagogy at the undergraduate level. She is particularly interested in the teaching and learning of concepts related to thermodynamics. She is also interested in active, collaborative, and problem-based learning, and in the ways hands-on activities and technology in general and games in particular can be used to improve student engagement.

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Michael J. Prince Bucknell University

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Dr. Michael Prince is a professor of chemical engineering at Bucknell University and co-director of the National Effective Teaching Institute. His research examines a range of engineering education topics, including how to assess and repair student misconceptions and how to increase the adoption of research-based instructional strategies by college instructors and corporate trainers. He is actively engaged in presenting workshops on instructional design to both academic and corporate instructors.

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Katharyn E. K. Nottis Bucknell University

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Dr. Nottis is an Educational Psychologist and Professor of Education at Bucknell University. Her research has focused on meaningful learning in science and engineering education, approached from the perspective of Human Constructivism. She has authored several publications and given numerous presentations on the generation of analogies, misconceptions, and facilitating learning in science and engineering education. She has been involved in collaborative research projects focused on conceptual learning in chemistry, chemical engineering, seismology, and astronomy.

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Milo Koretsky Oregon State University

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Milo Koretsky is a Professor of Chemical Engineering at Oregon State University. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from UC San Diego and his Ph.D. from UC Berkeley, all in Chemical Engineering. He currently has research activity in areas related engineering education and is interested in integrating technology into effective educational practices and in promoting the use of higher-level cognitive skills in engineering problem solving. His research interests particularly focus on what prevents students from being able to integrate and extend the knowledge developed in specific courses in the core curriculum to the more complex, authentic problems and projects they face as professionals. Dr. Koretsky is one of the founding members of the Center for Lifelong STEM Education Research at OSU.

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Thomas W Ekstedt Oregon State University

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Thomas Ekstedt is a software developer in the School of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering at Oregon State University. He is involved in the development of technology-based educational systems, particularly in the areas of concept-based instruction and interactive simulation of physical phenomena.

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Abstract

We have created analogous versions of our inquiry-based activities for misconception repair in heat transfer to ease faculty adoption into just about any type of instructional situation. Activities now work as laboratory experiments, in-class demonstrations, collaborative studio sessions, or simulations that can be assigned as homework. In our paper, we discuss each of these modes in detail and how they may be accessed through the AIChE Concept Warehouse. We also have measured the impact of each of these modes on the conceptual understanding of students; we know from previous work that student-conducted experiments are effective at repairing misconceptions. In our presentation, we will share the effectiveness of the alternate modes of presentation, as well as data on how easy these new modes are for faculty and students to use. We invite everyone who is teaching a heat transfer course or another course where ideas about radiation heat transfer, or factors influencing the rate and amount of heat transfer, to access these activities and freely use them in class.

Vigeant, M. A., & Prince, M. J., & Nottis, K. E. K., & Koretsky, M., & Ekstedt, T. W. (2016, June), Hands-on, Screens-on, and Brains-on Activities for Important Concepts in Heat Transfer Paper presented at 2016 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, New Orleans, Louisiana. 10.18260/p.25449

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