Asee peer logo

Industry Driven Curriculum Development, The Key To Successful Courseware

Download Paper |

Conference

2001 Annual Conference

Location

Albuquerque, New Mexico

Publication Date

June 24, 2001

Start Date

June 24, 2001

End Date

June 27, 2001

ISSN

2153-5965

Page Count

14

Page Numbers

6.578.1 - 6.578.14

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/9377

Download Count

157

Request a correction

Paper Authors

author page

Jerome Tapper

Download Paper |

Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session Number 3247

Industry Driven Curriculum Development, the Key to Successful Courseware

Jerome Tapper Northeastern University, School of Engineering Technology

Abstract

Designing a curriculum of courses based upon donated equipment can be made easier if the donors help with this task. Not only are equipment manufacturers the best sources for gaining donated state of the art equipment, but they can also be an important resource when it comes time to develop the actual course material and content needed for new courses involving the use and application of their equipment and products. Northeastern University’s School of Engineering Technology has been fortunate to have received substantial laboratory equipment donations from major players in the Industrial Control Systems industry. These same players have generously contributed supplemental training materials in addition to their own time to assist in developing course curriculum for our program. This paper addresses the construction of this new curriculum and in particular the part industry has played. The results of a pilot course- program conducted in the Fall of 1999 are included along with comments from participating students.

Background

For the past two years, the author has been engaged in establishing industrial partnerships whose goal is to create strong ties to the industrial base in the Boston and surrounding New England areas. The impetus for creating these strong ties is linked to this educator’s desire to improve future student cooperative work assignments, and increase both after-graduation employment opportunities and industrial research project assignments. Over the past two years, industrial partnerships have been established with two leaders in the industrial control systems market, Siemens Energy and Automation Corporation and Cutler-Hammer Corporation.2 3 Partnerships have been established with several other smaller players as well. Each of these companies has committed itself to assisting Northeastern University’s School of Engineering Technology in achieving its goal of becoming a prominent provider of quality Industrial Control Systems (ICS) training. To this end, these companies have made substantial equipment donations to our program. Working closely with corporate donors has allowed our newly developed industrial control systems courses to become greatly enriched by virtue of “working with the masters” themselves. The following describes the courses that were developed and implemented under the creative and watchful eye of our industrial partners.

Proceedings of the 2001 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright  2001, American Society for Engineering Education

Tapper, J. (2001, June), Industry Driven Curriculum Development, The Key To Successful Courseware Paper presented at 2001 Annual Conference, Albuquerque, New Mexico. https://peer.asee.org/9377

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2001 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015