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Interfacing J Dsp With A Ti Dsk For Use In A Signal Processing Class

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Conference

2006 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Chicago, Illinois

Publication Date

June 18, 2006

Start Date

June 18, 2006

End Date

June 21, 2006

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Issues in Digital Signal Processing

Tagged Division

Computers in Education

Page Count

11

Page Numbers

11.816.1 - 11.816.11

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/878

Download Count

146

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Paper Authors

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CHIH-WEI HUANG Arizona State University

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CHIH-WEI HUANG IS A MASTERS ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING STUDENT AT ARIZONA STATE. HIS RESEARCH IS IN REAL TIME SYSTEMS.

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Ashwinn Natarajan Arizona State University

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Ashwin Natarajan is a doctoral student at Arizona State University doing his research in adaptive systems

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Rony Ferzli Arizona State University

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Rony Ferzli is a Doctoral student working on image processing systems.

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Andreas Spanias Arizona State University

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

INTERFACING JAVA-DSP WITH A TI DSK FOR USE IN A SIGNAL PROCESSING CLASS

ABSTRACT

In this paper, we describe the development of interfaces of DSP hardware with the NSF funded Java-DSP (J-DSP) education software for use in undergraduate signals and systems and DSP classes. The interface enables undergraduate students to design and implement algorithms real time on DSP hardware using the user-friendly graphical interface of J-DSP. Simulations involving digital filters and FFTs are first established in the object oriented J-DSP environment. Through the use of a clever software interface, a real-time implementation of the algorithm is activated on the TI DSP Starter Kit C6713. The real-time implementation enables the students to examine the properties of various signal processing algorithms using real-life signals. A simple audio compression scheme that uses the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) is described with details. The algorithm exposes the students to the application of the FFT in a simplified MPEG-like audio compression scheme. The hardware–software interaction of J-DSP with the TI DSK is also explained to students; an introduction to the architecture and its peripherals is also part of the learning experience. Pre- and Post- assessment instruments have been developed and administered.

1. INTRODUCTION

An effective course in Digital Signal Processing (DSP) must convey theoretical and practical knowledge of concepts associated with the subject. While simulation tools such as MATLAB, Simulink, and J-DSP are valuable, running DSP algorithms on real-time hardware can further enhance the understanding of these concepts. With real-time DSP labs, students also gain insight into implementation issues associated with DSP algorithms [1-6]. They also gain an appreciation for several popular and appealing applications that use DSP chips, such as digital cellular phones and MP3 players. Several segments of the industry require students to be exposed to DSP hardware. In this endeavor, we choose the Texas Instruments (TI) TMS320C6713™ DSP Starter Kit (DSK), which is based on the C6713™ floating-point processor, as a platform for real-time DSP experiments. This choice was motivated by the availability of development tools and the popularity of the TI DSK in industry and academic training circles. Although fixed-point processors are less expensive and more power efficient than floating-point processors, they have a number of disadvantages including truncation and roundoff effects. Even with specialized training, programming fixed-point processors is difficult. Floating-point processors are easier to program

HUANG, C., & Natarajan, A., & Ferzli, R., & Spanias, A. (2006, June), Interfacing J Dsp With A Ti Dsk For Use In A Signal Processing Class Paper presented at 2006 Annual Conference & Exposition, Chicago, Illinois. https://peer.asee.org/878

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