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Introduction To Product Design And Innovation: A Cross Disciplinary Mini Curriculum

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Conference

2005 Annual Conference

Location

Portland, Oregon

Publication Date

June 12, 2005

Start Date

June 12, 2005

End Date

June 15, 2005

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Interdisciplinary Education

Page Count

10

Page Numbers

10.835.1 - 10.835.10

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/14614

Download Count

39

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Paper Authors

author page

Seth Bates

author page

Patricia Backer

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Introduction to Product Design and Innovation: A Cross-Disciplinary MiniCurriculum Patricia Ryaby Backer and Seth Bates San Jose State University

Abstract

For the past two years, faculty at San Jose State University (SJSU) have implemented a three- semester minicurriculum in Product Design and Manufacturing. The project follows the Project- Based Learning (PBL) model and is central to the Certificate Program in Product Design in the Mechanical Engineering Department, the Manufacturing Systems concentration in the Department of Aviation and Technology, and the Industrial Design Program in the School of Art and Design. Students in the three courses in the minicurriculum face design challenges while being instructed about the constraints of manufacturability. In each course, students develop three to four products. All products are developed using advanced solid modeling software, donated by EDS Unigraphics, capable of high levels of simulation and analysis. Instead of segregating the design, materials, and processing instruction, the minicurriculum uses design projects as a medium to learn product design basics including CAD, manufacturing materials, design for assembly, planned innovation process, and functional aesthetics. This initiative, a partnership between the College of Engineering and the School of Art and Design, models successful industry examples of integrated design and manufacturing and allows students to learn relevant collaborative skills early in their undergraduate education. The minicurriculum serves as a model of interdisciplinary education at SJSU.

Introduction

The overarching goal of this project was to produce and evaluate new cross-disciplinary educational materials in Product Design and Manufacturing between mechanical engineering, industrial technology, and industrial design; and to promote their dissemination, both locally to community colleges and nationally to faculty in other institutions. Secondary goals were to improve the ability of faculty to model effective use of technology in instruction, to empower the students to use technology effectively to deepen learning, and to model an integrated model of product design and manufacturing for students in Mechanical Engineering, Manufacturing Technology, and Industrial Design. The prototype work for this project was funded by a San Jose State University (SJSU) curriculum grant, a seed grant of $20,000 from Hewlett Packard for computer equipment, and Unigraphics software donated by UGS. The project team developed a three-course sequence using solid modeling as a medium to teach design, materials and manufacturing technology constraints through innovative design case studies. Students learn by facing design challenges while being instructed about the constraints of manufacturability including properties of materials and modern manufacturing methods. In each course, students develop three to four products. All products are developed using Unigraphics, an advanced solid modeling software capable of high levels of simulation and analysis. Studies of materials and “Proceedings of the 2005 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright © 2005, American Society for Engineering Education”

Bates, S., & Backer, P. (2005, June), Introduction To Product Design And Innovation: A Cross Disciplinary Mini Curriculum Paper presented at 2005 Annual Conference, Portland, Oregon. https://peer.asee.org/14614

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