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Laboratory Experiments In Instrumentation And Control

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Conference

1999 Annual Conference

Location

Charlotte, North Carolina

Publication Date

June 20, 1999

Start Date

June 20, 1999

End Date

June 23, 1999

ISSN

2153-5965

Page Count

8

Page Numbers

4.354.1 - 4.354.8

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/7799

Download Count

1137

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Paper Authors

author page

Ray Bachnak

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 2259

Laboratory Experiments in Instrumentation and Control

Ray Bachnak Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi

Abstract

Most engineering and engineering technology curricula include courses that use laboratory experiments to prepare students to apply effective solutions to real world problems. This includes the ability to define problems, identify alternative solutions, design circuits, and test systems. This paper describes a set of experiments that were developed for a junior level course in instrumentation and control. The experiments allow students to design, build, and test electronic circuits of varied levels of difficulty based on predetermined specifications. Schematic diagrams are shown and described.

Introduction

Many engineering and engineering technology curricula include courses that use laboratory experiments to enhance the students’ critical thinking and problem solving skills1-7. The objective is normally to prepare students to apply effective solutions to real world problems, including the ability to identify alternative solutions, design circuits, and test systems. This paper presents a set of experiments that allow students to experiment with electronic circuits of varied levels of difficulty based on predetermined specifications. The topics addressed include signal conditioning, analog-to-digital conversion, digital-to-analog conversion, sensors, and feedback control systems. A major expectation is that students either have or must develop skills in reading and interpreting data sheets, especially normal and maximum ratings.

Students were asked to design, build, and test electronic circuits that meet predetermined specifications. The requirements included devising test procedures to verify the operations. They worked in two- or three-person teams but prepared individual written reports that included a one to two-page conclusion where they described the function of the circuits, discussed results, mentioned problems they faced, stated what they have learned, and suggested ways to improve the laboratory assignments.

Laboratory manuals that address many instrumentation and control concepts are available8-11. The main purpose for developing the experiments was to supplement the classroom lectures with laboratory materials that correspond to the topics covered in the book12. In addition to the four experiments presented here, students used the software that accompanied the book to generate Bode plots and design filters. They also investigated the operation of an inverting amplifier circuit and learned how to “offset null” Op-Amps. Furthermore, experiment 3 combines two original circuits and experiment 4 was redesigned to use a negative Schmitt trigger circuit and a MJE3055T power transistor.

Bachnak, R. (1999, June), Laboratory Experiments In Instrumentation And Control Paper presented at 1999 Annual Conference, Charlotte, North Carolina. https://peer.asee.org/7799

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