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Learning Non-technical Skills from Pedagogical Training: Investigating IGERT Graduate Student Perceptions

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Conference

2015 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Seattle, Washington

Publication Date

June 14, 2015

Start Date

June 14, 2015

End Date

June 17, 2015

ISBN

978-0-692-50180-1

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Technical Session: Pedagogical Strategies and Classroom Techniques for Teaching Assistants

Tagged Division

Student

Page Count

16

Page Numbers

26.1073.1 - 26.1073.16

DOI

10.18260/p.24410

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/24410

Download Count

91

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Paper Authors

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Catherine G.P. Berdanier Purdue University, West Lafayette Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0003-3271-4836

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Catherine G.P. Berdanier is a Ph.D. Candidate in the School of Engineering Education at Purdue University. She earned her B.S. in Chemistry from The University of South Dakota and her M.S. in Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering from Purdue University. Her research interests include graduate-level engineering education, including inter- and multidisciplinary graduate education, innovative and novel graduate education experiences, global learning, and preparation of engineering graduate students for future careers. Her dissertation research focuses on studying the writing and argumentation patterns of engineering graduate students.

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Monica Farmer Cox Purdue University, West Lafayette

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Monica F. Cox, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor in the School of Engineering Education at Purdue University and is the Inaugural Director of the Engineering Leadership Minor. She obtained a B.S. in mathematics from Spelman College, a M.S. in industrial engineering from the University of Alabama, and a Ph.D. in Leadership and Policy Studies from Peabody College of Vanderbilt University. Teaching interests relate to the professional development of graduate engineering students and to leadership, policy, and change in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education. Primary research projects explore the preparation of engineering doctoral students for careers in academia and industry and the development of engineering education assessment tools. She is a National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career (CAREER) award winner and is a recipient of a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE).

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Thomas John Wallin Cornell University

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Thomas Wallin is a doctoral student in Materials Science and Engineering at Cornell University.

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Marc James Murphy

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Amanda Michelle Lorts Harding Norfolk State University

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Rabia Hussain Norfolk State University

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Sonny James Penterman Cornell University

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Vanessa Nicole Peters Norfolk State University

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Vanessa Nicole Peters is a PhD candidate in Materials Science Engineering at Norfolk State University. Her current research involves strong coupling of plasmonic materials and the influence of hyperbolic metamaterials on chemical reactions. As part of a collaborative effort with two other institutions, she also works as part of a team on interdisciplinary research and pedagogy training. This training has been very useful for several of the outreach events and undergraduate training that she has prepared as a graduate student. Vanessa holds a BS in chemistry from Norfolk State University.

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Thejaswi U. Tumkur Rice University

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Quincy Leon Williams Norfolk State University

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Suely M. Black Norfolk State University

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Suely M. Black, Ph.D. is a Professor of Chemistry, and Materials Science and Engineering at Norfolk State University, a Historically Black College and University in Virginia. Suely is driven to developing leadership and management skills in students and junior faculty. She has led the IGERT-MNM program funded by the National Science Foundation for almost five years, focusing on the renovation of graduate education to train doctoral students to become leaders in interdisciplinary areas of materials science, engineering and education. She has served as NSU Faculty Senate President since 2013. Suely teaches undergraduate science and non-science majors, and materials science graduate students. She earned her Ph.D. and M.Ph. in Chemistry from Columbia University, NY, and the B.Eng. in Chemical Engineering and the M.S. in Chemistry from Rio de Janeiro Federal University in Brazil.

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Abstract

Learning Non-Technical Skills from Interdisciplinary Training: Investigating IGERT Graduate Student ReflectionsAbstractInter- and multidisciplinary training has been advocated for graduate students as the problems facingscience and engineering become increasingly complex. The Integrative Graduate Education Research andTraineeship on [blinded for review] is a National Science Foundation-funded collaboration between[blinded for review] to prepare interdisciplinary science and engineering doctoral students for future rolesas leaders in the materials science and engineering fields. As part of this socialization into future careers,students proceed through a variety of modules throughout the year. This paper specifically studies one ofthe more unique modules, called the Pedagogy module, which seeks to introduce graduate engineeringstudents to best practices in teaching and student learning. The Pedagogy module has been taught for thelast four year, and each year, the deliverable at the end of the module differs based on student interest andprior experience. This study focuses on the fourth year of the module, during which, students were askedto pair with another graduate student to create a science activity and supporting materials for high schoolstudents and teachers. This study observes graduate students’ development using final reflections on thepedagogy module and project as data. Findings indicate that by practicing science activity design basedon their technical expertise, the doctoral students learned several non-technical skills that will be valuablein future careers, whether or not that profession will involve explicit aspects of education. In addition topedagogical knowledge gained, non-technical skills that students developed included (1) communicationskills; (2) the ability to convey technical expertise to non-technical audiences; and (3) virtual teamworkskills. These three skills have been noted in graduate literature to be areas of under-preparation for Ph.D.students. This shows that the development of non-technical professional skills can occur naturally wheninvolved in carefully designed authentic learning experiences. This research is important to theengineering education community in light of critiques of science and engineering doctoral education asbeing too narrow. Results of this research may offer similar opportunities and recommendations to otherengineering graduate programs.

Berdanier, C. G., & Cox, M. F., & Wallin, T. J., & Murphy, M. J., & Harding, A. M. L., & Hussain, R., & Penterman, S. J., & Peters, V. N., & Tumkur, T. U., & Williams, Q. L., & Black, S. M. (2015, June), Learning Non-technical Skills from Pedagogical Training: Investigating IGERT Graduate Student Perceptions Paper presented at 2015 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Seattle, Washington. 10.18260/p.24410

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2015 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015