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Learning to Live with Floods: Pedagogical Advantages of a Thematic Short Course Centered on International Exposure

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Conference

2011 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Vancouver, BC

Publication Date

June 26, 2011

Start Date

June 26, 2011

End Date

June 29, 2011

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Global Engineering Education: Cross-cultural Awareness and Social Impacts

Tagged Division

International

Page Count

16

Page Numbers

22.1007.1 - 22.1007.16

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/18268

Download Count

18

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Paper Authors

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Samuel James Boland University of Iowa, IIHR: Hydroscience and Engineering

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Michael V. Schaefer University of Iowa, IIHR: Hydroscience and Engineering

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Carmen M. Langel

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Taryn Michelle Tigges University of Iowa

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Fabienne Bertrand University of Iowa, IIHR: Hydroscience and Engineering

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Fabienne Bertrand is a recent Master’s graduate in Civil and Environmental Engineering from the University of Iowa. She obtained the Fulbright Scholarship for Foreign Students in 2008 and attended a study abroad course in The Netherlands and the United Kingdom in 2010. Her interests include stream bank restoration, water quality and sediment transport modeling.

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biography

Marian Muste University of Iowa, IIHR: Hydroscience and Engineering

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Dr. Muste is Research Engineer at IIHR-Hydroscience & Engineering, The University of Iowa (UI). He is Adjunct Professor with the Civil & Environmental Engineering Department and has a complementary appointment with the UI’s International Program. He holds graduate degrees in civil and environmental engineering with emphasis on experimental fluid mechanics and environmental hydraulics. His most recent area of research is the development of large-scale data/information management systems, sensors and senor networks, and their implementation in research and education focused on sustainable use of water and land resources. Dr. Muste is author or co-author of more than 150 technical papers and 75 reports.
Dr. Muste is an active international research and educator. He is expert for UNESCO’s International Hydrologic Program and World Meteorological Organization projects. He has extensive international experience a three-time Fulbright Fellow (2004, 2006, and 2009) and grantee of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science. He is instructor of a unique course in the US International Perspectives in Water Science Resources and Management. He is member of the Council of the International Association of Hydro-Environment Engineering and Research.

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Zachary David Hingst

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B.A. in Global Studies, University of Iowa, 2005
M.S. in Urban & Regional Planning, University of Iowa, 2010

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Timothy James Middlemis-Brown IIHR-Hydroscience & Engineering, The University of Iowa

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Mr. Middlemis-Brown received his undergraduate degree in civil engineering, with an environmental engineering focus, at The University of Iowa. He is currently a graduate student researcher and master's candidate at IIHR-Hydroscience & Engineering at The University of Iowa. His research involves a mix of technical engineering work and social outreach. The combination has led to thesis work involving the communication, forecasting, and mapping components of flood response. This work represents the culmination of research interest begun while working for the Iowa Department of Natural Resources and early in his graduate career. These projects have resulted in various presentations and other networking opportunities, which have led him to a strong interest in methods for communicating science, disseminating information, and educating the public.

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Abstract

Learning to Live with Floods: Pedagogical Advantages of a Thematic Short Course Centered on International ExposureThe increasingly global nature of all fields of engineering has created new pressures on educators toprovide valuable international experience to their respective engineering students. The InternationalPerspectives in Water Resource Science & Management (IPWRSM) course is steeped in over tenyears of history in international experiences that have been provided to both graduate students andundergraduate students alike. Recognizing the need to expose students to the international facets ofthe engineering and research workplaces, the IPWRSM course aims to provide students with theinternational experience gained in a traditional study abroad course while overcoming the obstaclesto enrollment that result in typical under-representation of engineering students. In addition toproviding engineering curriculum, an opportunity to connect engineering education organizations indifferent parts of the world is also provided. The rigors of the highly demanding engineeringcurriculum have been circumvented by the application of a short-term model that provides distinctpedagogical advantages over semester long study abroad courses.A 2010 two week excursion to the Netherlands and the United Kingdom presents a case study thatshowcases the introduction to concepts present in differing academic and professional cultures. Thetheme of “Learning to Live with Floods” provided students experience to cutting edge floodmanagement and modeling techniques. This exposure served to enhance students’ academic goalsin a fashion that would be impossible during the course of typical engineering curricula. The widevariety of lectures, presentations, and field trips are provided in a context that serves to acclimatestudents to a career that is increasingly likely to be multicultural and global. Surveys that werecompleted both before and after the Netherlands/UK offering of the course, in conjunction withsurveys from a previous course to Egypt, provide quantitative evidence towards the benefits of theshort-term model. Evidence points toward the fact that the IPWRSM form of the short-term studyabroad model prepares students for the increasingly global environment of the engineeringworkplace, and the model must be developed further and find more wide-spread implementation.Figure 1: Montage of photographs demonstrating the wide variety of exposure provided throughoutthe course.References that aid in providing a basis for work undertaken:DiBiasio, David, and Natalie A. Mello. "Multilevel Assessment of Program Outcomes: Assessing aNontraditional Study Abroad Program in the Engineering Disciplines." Frontiers: TheInterdisciplinary Journal of Study Abroad, 2004: 237-252.Lohmann, Jack R., Howard A. Rollins, and J. Joseph Hoey. "Defining, developing, and assessingglobal competence in engineers." European Journal of Engineering Education, 2006: 119-131Sheppard, Keith, Peter Dominick, and Zvi Aronson. "Preparing Engineering Students for the NewBusiness Paradigm of International Teamwork and Global Orientation." International Journal ofEngineering Education, 2004: 475-483.

Boland, S. J., & Schaefer, M. V., & Langel, C. M., & Tigges, T. M., & Bertrand, F., & Muste, M., & Hingst, Z. D., & Middlemis-Brown, T. J. (2011, June), Learning to Live with Floods: Pedagogical Advantages of a Thematic Short Course Centered on International Exposure Paper presented at 2011 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Vancouver, BC. https://peer.asee.org/18268

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