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Longitudinal Assessment of Engineering Student EM Using the ESEMA Self-Report Survey

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Conference

2022 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Minneapolis, MN

Publication Date

August 23, 2022

Start Date

June 26, 2022

End Date

June 29, 2022

Conference Session

Entrepreneurship & Engineering Innovation Division Technical Session 3

Page Count

19

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/40387

Download Count

79

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Paper Authors

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Alexandra Jackson

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Alexandra Jackson is a first year PhD student at Rowan University seeking a specialization in Engineering Education. She began her research in Rowan's Experiential Engineering Education Department in the Fall of 2019, and has developed interests in entrepreneurial mindset and student development. In particular, she is interested in assessment of entrepreneurial mindset through both quantitative and qualitative methods, and is currently working in both survey and concept map assessment. She was awarded an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship in April, 2022, and hopes to continue her research in entrepreneurial mindset assessment using narrative inquiry.

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Kevin Dahm Rowan University

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Kevin Dahm is a Professor of Chemical Engineering at Rowan University. He received his B.S. from Worcester Polytechnic Institute in 1992 and his Ph.D. from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1998. He is an author of the textbook Fundamentals of Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics, and is an Associate Editor for the journals Advances in Engineering Education and Education for Chemical Engineers.

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Kaitlin Mallouk Rowan University

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Kaitlin Mallouk is an Assistant Professor and Undergraduate Program Coordinator in Experiential Engineering Education at Rowan University. Prior to beginning that role, she spent five years an Instructor in the Mechanical Engineering and Experiential Engineering Education Departments at Rowan. Kaitlin has a BS in Chemical Engineering from Cornell University and an MS and PhD in Environmental Engineering in Civil Engineering from the University of Illinois.

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Bruce Oestreich

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Cheryl Bodnar Rowan University

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Dr. Cheryl Bodnar is an Associate Professor in the Experiential Engineering Education Department at Rowan University and is currently serving as the Provost’s Fellow for Student Success. Recently, the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Kern Family Foundation have funded her research. Her research interests relate to the incorporation of active learning techniques such as game-based learning in undergraduate classes as well as integration of innovation and entrepreneurship into the engineering curriculum. In particular, she is interested in the impact that these tools can have on student perception of the classroom environment, motivation, and learning outcomes.

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Scott Streiner University of Pittsburgh

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Scott Streiner is visiting Assistant Professor in the Industrial Engineering Department, First-Year Engineering Program and the Engineering Education Research Center (EERC) in the Swanson School of Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh. From 2017-2021, he served as an Assistant Professor in the Experiential Engineering Education Department at Rowan University where he taught first and second year engineering students. Scott received his Ph.D. in Industrial Engineering from the University of Pittsburgh, with a focus on global engineering education. His current research areas include cultural competency in engineering education, pedagogical inmoves through game-based and playful learning, and engineering ethics education.

Scott has recently received funding through the National Science Foundation (NSF) to conduct research on the impact of game-based learning on the development of first-year students’ ethical reasoning, as well as research on the development of culturally responsive ethics education in global contexts. He is an active member of the Kern Engineering Entrepreneurship Network (KEEN), the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE), and serves on the First-Year Engineering Education (FYEE) Conference Steering Committee.

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Abstract

In order to meet industry expectations of engineering graduates, measuring longitudinal growth of Entrepreneurial Mindset (EM) is necessary. Industry expects to hire engineers with a wide range of both entrepreneurial and technical skills, making it crucial to understand how students are developing their EM over the course of their undergraduate programs. This has led to the development of numerous assessment strategies including self report surveys such as the Engineering Student Entrepreneurial Mindset Assessment (ESEMA).

This study addresses the gap in longitudinal EM assessment by administering the ESEMA survey across the first four semesters of the undergraduate curriculum. The ESEMA breaks down EM development into six distinct sub-constructs: Altruism, Empathy, Help Seeking, Ideation, Interest, and Open Mindedness, and students are instructed to rate their agreement with various statements relating to each sub-construct on a five-point Likert scale. Data was gathered from two cohorts of students who were asked to complete the survey during the start of the fall and end of the spring semesters of their first and second year. After examining the data, it was found that students across both cohorts reported the highest values for Open Mindedness (4.52-4.54) and had the lowest scores for Ideation (3.24-3.40) in all four semesters. We also saw significant growth in Empathy and Help Seeking across these four semesters. Out of the two cohorts of students, there was a smaller sub-population which completed the ESEMA during all four semesters, allowing for examination of the same students' mindset development. The results of the analysis that followed the same group of students showed that in addition to showing growth in Empathy and Help Seeking, the students in this sub-population significantly increased in their Interest and Open Mindedness scores. These results seem to indicate that curricular interventions which encourage teamwork, collaboration, and designing solutions for real world problems can help students develop in multiple of the sub-constructs associated with EM.

Jackson, A., & Dahm, K., & Mallouk, K., & Oestreich, B., & Bodnar, C., & Streiner, S. (2022, August), Longitudinal Assessment of Engineering Student EM Using the ESEMA Self-Report Survey Paper presented at 2022 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Minneapolis, MN. https://peer.asee.org/40387

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