Asee peer logo

Longitudinal Integration of the Same Design Project in Multiple Structural Engineering Courses

Download Paper |

Conference

2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Tampa, Florida

Publication Date

June 15, 2019

Start Date

June 15, 2019

End Date

June 19, 2019

Conference Session

High-Impact Teaching and Learning

Tagged Division

Civil Engineering

Page Count

16

DOI

10.18260/1-2--33071

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/33071

Download Count

109

Request a correction

Paper Authors

biography

Matthew Swenty P.E. Virginia Military Institute

visit author page

Matthew (Matt) Swenty obtained his Bachelors and Masters degrees in Civil Engineering from Missouri S&T and then worked as a bridge designer at the Missouri Department of Transportation. He returned to school to obtain his Ph.D. in Civil Engineering at Virginia Tech followed by research work at the Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center on concrete bridges. He is currently an associate professor of Civil Engineering at the Virginia Military Institute (VMI). He teaches engineering mechanics and structural engineering courses at VMI and enjoys working with the students on bridge related research projects and with the ASCE student chapter.

visit author page

biography

Benjamin Z. Dymond University of Minnesota Duluth Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-4752-3445

visit author page

Ben Dymond obtained his B.S. and M.S. degrees in Civil Engineering at Virginia Tech before obtaining his Ph.D. in Civil Engineering at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities. Ben is currently an assistant professor of structural engineering at the University of Minnesota Duluth.

visit author page

author page

Sara Ojard

Download Paper |

Abstract

Civil engineering students may perceive that their course curriculum is composed of several isolated structural design classes that build expertise in separate areas that do not overlap. The objective of this research was to integrate the same design project longitudinally in steel and reinforced concrete design classes at multiple universities to introduce the ideas of iterative design, underscore design options, and reinforce common, key concepts. Several questions were investigated using longitudinal integration of a common design project. First, how did students perform when completing the project for the first time in reinforced concrete design compared to those completing the project for the first time in steel design? Second, considering the same cohort of students, how did they perform on the project the second time in steel design compared to the first time in reinforced concrete design? Third, the students’ knowledge on basic structural analysis and plan reading was measured at the beginning and end of each course. What level of knowledge did they have when entering the respective course? Were students’ perceptions of their knowledge gains during the courses supported by assessed knowledge gains?

Student design project grades and pre- and post-surveys were used to answer the research questions. Students completing the project for the first time in steel design had slightly higher grades than those completing the project the first time in reinforced concrete design. Students completing the project for the second time had slightly higher average final grades compared to students completing the project for the first time. Survey results indicated that students’ confidence in reading plans increased substantially the first time through the project regardless of which design class they took first, but remained similar the second time through. The students’ ability to set up and solve free body diagrams from the structural plans continued to improve each time they completed the project, regardless of the course. Based on these results, students made the most knowledge gains the first time through the project, retained substantial knowledge after the first time through the project, but continued to gain confidence after completing the project the second time. 

Swenty, M., & Dymond, B. Z., & Ojard, S. (2019, June), Longitudinal Integration of the Same Design Project in Multiple Structural Engineering Courses Paper presented at 2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition , Tampa, Florida. 10.18260/1-2--33071

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2019 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015