Asee peer logo

Making Space for the Women: Exploring Female Engineering Student Narratives of Engagement in Makerspaces

Download Paper |

Conference

2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Tampa, Florida

Publication Date

June 15, 2019

Start Date

June 15, 2019

End Date

June 19, 2019

Conference Session

Women in Engineering Division Technical Session 1

Tagged Division

Women in Engineering

Tagged Topic

Diversity

Page Count

11

DOI

10.18260/1-2--33078

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/33078

Download Count

430

Request a correction

Paper Authors

biography

Christina K. Lam Arizona State University

visit author page

Christina K. Lam is a Ph.D. student in Counseling Psychology at Arizona State University. She has previously earned her B.S. in Psychology and M.A. in Counseling Psychology. Her previous research has examined Asian American ethnic identity formation, racial/ethnic and gender differences in perceptions of financial stress, and the integration of a three apprenticeships framework in engineering. Her current research emphasizes a health belief approach to examine the likelihood of mental health help-seeking behaviors among Asian Americans.

visit author page

biography

Samantha N. Cruz Arizona State University

visit author page

Samantha N. Cruz, M.A., is a Ph.D. student in Counseling Psychology at Arizona State University and previously earned her B.A. in Psychology and M.A. in Counseling Psychology. She has previously conducted research investigating the impact of diversity interventions on campus climate as well as the impact of racial discrimination on Latina/o adolescents’ academic outcomes. Her research interests center on examining racial and ethnic disparities in education as well as resources to promote the academic success of students from marginalized backgrounds.

visit author page

biography

Nadia N. Kellam Arizona State University

visit author page

Nadia Kellam is Associate Professor in the Polytechnic School of the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering at Arizona State University (ASU). She is a qualitative researcher who primarily uses narrative research methods and is interested more broadly in interpretive research methods. In her research, Dr. Kellam is broadly interested in developing critical understandings of the culture of engineering education and, especially, the experiences of underrepresented undergraduate engineering students and engineering educators. In addition to teaching undergraduate engineering courses and a graduate course on entrepreneurship, she also enjoys teaching qualitative research methods in engineering education in the Engineering Education Systems and Design PhD program at ASU. She is deputy editor of the Journal of Engineering Education.

visit author page

biography

Brooke Charae Coley Arizona State University, Polytechnic campus

visit author page

Brooke Coley, PhD is an Assistant Professor in Engineering at the Polytechnic School of the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering at Arizona State University. Intrigued by the intersections of engineering education, mental health and social justice, Dr. Coley’s primary research interest focuses on virtual reality as a tool for developing empathetic and inclusive mindsets. She is also interested in hidden populations in engineering education and innovation for more inclusive pedagogies. In 2017, Dr. Coley was recognized as an Apprentice Faculty Grant recipient by the Educational Research and Methods Division of the American Society for Engineering Education for her commitment to innovation in teaching and potential to make substantial contributions to engineering education. Prior to joining the Polytechnic School, Dr. Coley served as the Associate Director for the Center for Diversity in Engineering at the University of Virginia and as a policy fellow at the National Science Foundation.

visit author page

Download Paper |

Abstract

Makerspaces have the potential to revolutionize engineering education by providing a platform for students to nurture their tacit knowledge. This unique space allows for students to work with advanced prototyping equipment, develop specialized skills and create community. Although makerspaces could become an important dimension of engineering education, it is unclear whether these spaces are inclusive for all engineering students, especially those from underrepresented groups. Specifically, this study aims to understand the experiences of diverse women engineering students in makerspaces. For this study, we analyzed interview transcripts of ten women from multiple U.S. universities housing engineering academic makerspaces—those anchored to and supported by the engineering department/school specifically—and found common themes across their stories. These themes include the perception of gender bias, as well as an intimidating, hostile, and non-inclusive environment. Although the results of this study demonstrate gender bias and marginalization occur in makerspaces, female engineering students still find value in the makerspace through access to resources, opportunities to learn, increased confidence and female makerspace staff.

Lam , C. K., & Cruz, S. N., & Kellam, N. N., & Coley, B. C. (2019, June), Making Space for the Women: Exploring Female Engineering Student Narratives of Engagement in Makerspaces Paper presented at 2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition , Tampa, Florida. 10.18260/1-2--33078

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2019 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015