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Measuring Student Content Knowledge, iSTEM, Self Efficacy, and Engagement through a Long-Term Engineering Design Intervention

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Conference

2016 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

New Orleans, Louisiana

Publication Date

June 26, 2016

Start Date

June 26, 2016

End Date

August 28, 2016

ISBN

978-0-692-68565-5

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

K-12 & Pre-College Engineering Division: Fundamental: K-12 Student Beliefs, Motivation, and Self Efficacy

Tagged Division

Pre-College Engineering Education Division

Tagged Topic

Diversity

Page Count

23

DOI

10.18260/p.25694

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/25694

Download Count

389

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Paper Authors

biography

Michael A. de Miranda Colorado State University

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Professor Engineering Education, School of Education and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO USA

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biography

Karen E. Rambo-Hernandez West Virginia University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0001-8107-2898

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Karen E. Rambo-Hernandez is an assistant professor at West Virginia University in the College of Education and Human Services in the department of Learning Sciences and Human Development. In her research, she is interested the assessment of student learning, particularly the assessment of academic growth, and evaluating the impact of curricular change.

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Paul R. Hernandez West Virginia University

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Abstract

The current study reports on the outcomes of a classroom-based long term engineering design intervention intended to increase high school students’ perceptions of the integrated nature of STEM disciplines (iSTEM) and to assess the effect of the intervention on student participation in an extracurricular STEM activity (i.e., a research poster symposium). Cross-disciplinary teams of students (n=373) from high school mathematics, science, and engineering classrooms completed engineering design challenges. The results indicated that, consistent with our predictions, the intervention exhibited a positive impact on students that began the study with the lowest iSTEM scores. Furthermore, the classroom environment mattered. While no individual scores (i.e., posttest iSTEM scores) were predictive of participation in the poster symposium, the collective scores were (i.e., mean classroom iSTEM scores). Four measures were used in this study; Content knowledge quiz. Student content knowledge was assessed with a teacher made nine-item multiple-choice quiz; Self-efficacy, task specific self-efficacy was assessed through a nine item measure; iSTEM perceptions. Participants responded to a nine-item iSTEM scale developed by the authors in a previously published study, to measure student perceptions of the interconnections between mathematics, science, and engineering; and STEM clubs. Participants responded “Yes” (1) or “No” (0) to the question regarding their involvement in extracurricular STEM club.

Hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) was used in this analysis because it distinguishes variability in scores at the student-level (i.e., level-1) from variability in scores at the classroom level (i.e., level-2), which results in correctly estimating standard error. Therefore, HLM was used to conduct multilevel paired sample t-tests. Further, all analyses were conducted with Restricted Maximum Likelihood estimation. The results indicated that, consistent with our predictions, the intervention exhibited a positive impact on students that began the study with the lowest iSTEM scores. Furthermore, the classroom environment mattered. While no individual scores (i.e., posttest iSTEM scores) were predictive of participation in the poster symposium, the collective scores were (i.e., mean classroom iSTEM scores).

de Miranda, M. A., & Rambo-Hernandez, K. E., & Hernandez, P. R. (2016, June), Measuring Student Content Knowledge, iSTEM, Self Efficacy, and Engagement through a Long-Term Engineering Design Intervention Paper presented at 2016 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, New Orleans, Louisiana. 10.18260/p.25694

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