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Modeling The Career Pathways Of Women Engineering Faculty Through Oral Histories And Participatory Research Methods

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Conference

2010 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Louisville, Kentucky

Publication Date

June 20, 2010

Start Date

June 20, 2010

End Date

June 23, 2010

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Modeling Student Data

Tagged Division

Educational Research and Methods

Page Count

12

Page Numbers

15.882.1 - 15.882.12

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/16703

Download Count

959

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Paper Authors

author page

Jordana Hoegh Purdue University

author page

Alice Pawley Purdue University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/https://0000-0001-9117-4855

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Modeling the career pathways of women STEM faculty through oral histories and participatory research methods Abstract Women increasingly earn advanced degrees in science, technology, and mathematics (STEM), yet remain underrepresented among STEM faculty. Much of the existing research on this underrepresentation relies on “chilly climate” and “pipeline” theoretical models to explain this phenomenon. However, the extent to which these models follow women’s actual career pathways has been undertheorized. Further, alternative metaphors may more aptly describe the career pathways of women STEM faculty. In our broader research project, we examine the ways women’s career pathways into STEM faculty positions are similar to and/or different from chilly climate and pipeline models, and if they vary based on race and/or ethnicity. At present, we focus on the ways oral histories and participatory research methods allow us to model the career pathways of women STEM faculty.

Our goal is to illustrate how oral history and participatory research are effective methods to: 1) identify women’s career pathways into STEM faculty; 2) compare and contrast career pathways to climate and pipeline metaphors as well as discover new metaphors; 3) identify critical points in women’s career pathways; and 4) discover new information about women’s paths into STEM faculty.

We describe early results from a set of semi-structured interviews of women faculty in STEM disciplines collected as part of research done through an ADVANCE grant, a NSF- funded project intended to achieve improved career success for women faculty in STEM disciplines. Interviews begin with oral histories that give context, depth, and structure to women’s pathways into STEM faculty careers. Through participatory research methods, we tell participants the goals of the research and ask them to discuss, challenge, and suggest ways institutions may improve career success for women STEM faculty. Taken together, career pathways are modeled and compared with chilly climate and pipeline models. This innovative methodological approach will inform policy, recruitment procedures, and ways to retain women faculty.

Introduction We describe the potential of two social science research methods to model women’s pathways into STEM faculty careers and develop new theoretical models to understand women’s underrepresentation as STEM faculty, with a particular focus on women faculty of color. We use data from a set of semi-structured interviews of women STEM faculty early in their careers to illustrate how these social science research methods may increase our understanding of women’s career paths and shed light on the ways university policies and department culture affect the career experiences of women STEM faculty.

This purpose of the overall study is to examine the academic career pathways of women faculty in STEM disciplines at a large research university, with particular focus on women of color. The study investigates the extent to which their career pathways into and through academic faculty levels in STEM disciplines are modeled by pipeline or chilly climate models that metaphorically

Hoegh, J., & Pawley, A. (2010, June), Modeling The Career Pathways Of Women Engineering Faculty Through Oral Histories And Participatory Research Methods Paper presented at 2010 Annual Conference & Exposition, Louisville, Kentucky. https://peer.asee.org/16703

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