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NUE (EEC): Integrating Nanodevice Design, Fabrication, and Analysis into the Mechanical Engineering Curriculum

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Conference

2011 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Vancouver, BC

Publication Date

June 26, 2011

Start Date

June 26, 2011

End Date

June 29, 2011

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Tagged Topic

NSF Grantees

Page Count

22

Page Numbers

22.1112.1 - 22.1112.22

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/18968

Download Count

30

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Paper Authors

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Santosh Devasia University of Washington

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Santosh Devasia is the Principal Investigator of a recently funded grant from the NSF Nanotechnology Undergraduate Education (NUE) Program, Grant # EEC 1042061; the proposed educational efforts under this NUE grant are described in this paper.

Santosh Devasia received the B.Tech. (Hons) from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, India, in 1988, and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Mechanical Engineering from the University of California at Santa Barbara in 1990 and 1993 respectively. He is a Professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department at the University of Washington, Seattle where he joined in 2000. From 1994 to 2000, he taught in the Mechanical Engineering Department at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City. He has served as the Associate Editor for the ASME Journal of Dynamic Systems, Measurement and Control and the IEEE Transactions on Control Systems Technology. His current research interests include inversion-based control theory and applications such as high-precision positioning systems for Atomic Force Microscopes and Scanning Tunneling Microscopes used in nanotechnology, biomedical applications such as the imaging of human cells to investigate cell locomotion, and control of distributed systems such as Air Traffic Management.

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Jim L. Borgford-Parnell University of Washington Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0003-3188-6302

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Dr. Jim Borgford-Parnell is Assistant Director and instructional consultant for the Center for Engineering Learning & Teaching at the University of Washington. He taught design drawing, and theory, research methods, educational theory, and adult and higher education pedagogy courses for over 25 years. Jim has been involved in instructional development more than ten years, and currently does both research and instructional development in engineering education.

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Jae-Hyun Chung University of Washington

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Jae-Hyun Chung is McMinn Endowed Assistant Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at University of Washington. Dr. Chung received his B.S. in 1995 and M.S. in 1997 from Sungkyunkwan University in Korea. His Ph.D. was earned in 2004 from Northwestern University in the field of electric field guided assembly of carbon nanotubes. He has received awards including, the McMinn Endowed Professorship, an NSF Career Award, and a Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Award.

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Jiangyu Li University of Washington

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Amy Shen University of Washington

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Professor Amy Shen is an Associate Professor at Mechanical Engineering department from University of Washington. She earned her Ph.D. in Theoretical and Applied Mechanics from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She was a postdoctoral research fellow at Harvard University and an assistant professor at Washington University in St. Louis from 2002 - 2007. Amy Shen's research program concerns complex fluids and the processing of these fascinating materials to create morphologies and structures that can find application in the nanotechnology, biotechnology, and energy related materials. Within this broad area, her laboratory takes advantage of the coupling of complex fluid microstructures with the spatial confinement that is possible by using microfluidic flow methods, to offer exquisite morphological control of soft materials.

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Nathan Sniadecki University of Washington

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Junlan Wang University of Washington

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Junlan Wang has been an Associate Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Washington since Dec. 2008. Before joining UW, she was an Assistant (2003 - 2008) and then Associate Professor (2008) in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of California, Riverside. Professor Wang's research is in the area of nano and micromechanics of complex material systems. She is interested in developing novel experimental techniques complemented by numerical and analytical approaches to study the mechanics and physics of materials and structures at small spatial and temporal scales. Professor Wang is a member of ASEE, ASME, MRS, and SEM.

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Abstract

NUE: Integrating Nanodevice Design, Fabrication, and Analysis into the Mechanical Engineering Curriculum Santosh Devasia, Jaehyun Chung, Jim Borgford-Parnell, Jiangyu Li, Amy Q Shen, Nathan J Sniadecki, Junlan Wang U. of Washington, Seattle AbstractThis article describes a new nanotechnology undergraduate education (NUE) program on thedesign of nanodevices in the Mechanical Engineering Department at the University ofWashington. The NUE program leverages existing strengths of the mechanical engineering(ME) curriculum in analysis, fabrication, and design of (larger-scale) devices by integratingnovel developments and unique challenges in nanodevices into the ME curriculum.It is noted that educational efforts in nanodevices have become important as nanotechnologiesmove from research laboratories into industries.For example, nanodevices are critical torenewable energy and next-generation electronics. Additionally, nanodevices have applicationsin biotechnologies, e.g., in the development of sensors for early detection and prevention ofdisease. The proposed NUE program will integrate issues in the engineering of nanodevices intothe undergraduate curriculum to prepare the engineering workforce for emerging nanotechnologyindustries. The learning outcomes of this program are that students who participate in theproposed program should be able to: (i) analyze nanodevices using appropriate theoretical andexperimental approaches; (ii) explain basic elements of fabrication processes for nanodevices;and (iii) solve open-ended, nanodevice-design problems.The article describes the theoretical and experimental modules in nanodevices developed for thisnew NUE program. These modules are systematically and sequentially linked and integratedwith eight courses that currently exist in the ME curriculum at the University of Washington(UW). Five of these courses are core required ME courses (at the UW) that are offered in typicalME curriculum at other universities. This integration into existing core ME curriculum willfacilitate the potential adoption of the proposed nanodevice modules at other universities.Acknowledgment: Funding from NSF Nanotechnology Undergraduate Education (NUE)Program, NSF Grant EEC 1042061, is gratefully acknowledged.

Devasia, S., & Borgford-Parnell, J. L., & Chung, J., & Li, J., & Shen, A., & Sniadecki, N., & Wang, J. (2011, June), NUE (EEC): Integrating Nanodevice Design, Fabrication, and Analysis into the Mechanical Engineering Curriculum Paper presented at 2011 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Vancouver, BC. https://peer.asee.org/18968

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