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Problem Solving and Difficulty Perception in YouTube Problems Involving Reacting Systems with Recycle

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Conference

2021 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access

Location

Virtual Conference

Publication Date

July 26, 2021

Start Date

July 26, 2021

End Date

July 19, 2022

Conference Session

Learning Outcomes and Assessment Within Chemical Engineering

Tagged Division

Chemical Engineering

Page Count

11

Permanent URL

https://strategy.asee.org/37602

Download Count

6

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Paper Authors

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Uchenna Asogwa The University of Toledo Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0003-0447-5938

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Uchenna Asogwa is a Ph.D. student in Chemical Engineering at the University of Toledo. His current research involves reverse engineering online videos, the rheology of complex fluids, and fuel cell membranes.

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Timothy Ryan Duckett The University of Toledo Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0001-8060-6149

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T. Ryan Duckett is a research associate with Acumen Research and Evaluation, LLC., a program evaluation and grant writing company that specializes in STEM and early childhood education. He is a PhD student in the Research and Measurement department at the University of Toledo.

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Amanda Portis Malefyt Trine University

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Amanda Malefyt is currently Chair and Associate professor in the McKetta Department of Chemical and Bioprocess Engineering at Trine University. She received her bachelor’s degree from Trine (formerly Tri-State) University and Ph.D. from Michigan State University. Her research interests include engineering education and nucleic acid therapeutics.

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Gale A. Mentzer Acumen Research and Evaluation, LLC

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Gale A. Mentzer, PhD, the owner and director of Acumen Research and Evaluation, LLC, has been a professional program evaluator since 1998. She holds a PhD in Educational Research and Measurement from The University of Toledo and a Master of Arts in English Literature and Language—a unique combination of specializations that melds quantitative and qualitative methodologies. She and has extensive experience in the evaluation of projects focused on STEM education including evaluations of several multi-million dollar federally funded projects. Previously she taught graduate level courses for the College of Education at The University of Toledo in Statistics, Testing and Grading, Research Design, and Program Evaluation.

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Matthew W. Liberatore The University of Toledo Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-5495-7145

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Matthew W. Liberatore is a Professor of Chemical Engineering at the University of Toledo. He earned a B.S. degree from the University of Illinois at Chicago and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, all in chemical engineering. His current research involves the rheology of complex fluids as well as active learning, reverse engineering online videos, and interactive textbooks. His website is: http://www.utoledo.edu/engineering/chemical-engineering/liberatore/

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Abstract

Complex problem-solving is a vital skill prevalent to thrive in the workforce along with creativity and conceptual thinking. Homework problems allow engineering students to practice problem solving, and writing new problems can be a creative process for students. Our previous research found that implementing alternative, student-written homework problems, referred to as YouTube problems, led to better learning attitudes. YouTube problems are course related; homework-quality problems generated by reverse engineering publicly available videos. Comparing learning experiences of students solving YouTube versus Textbook problems is the focus of the current study. Impacts of solving YouTube problems are examined based on perception of difficulty as well as students’ problem-solving skills displayed by students. To enable testing, students were assigned one textbook and three YouTube problems. Perception of problem difficulty across problems was examined using the NASA Task Load Index. Additionally, problem solving aptitudes while solving homework problems was assessed using a previously validated rubric called PROCESS: Problem definition, Representing the problem, Organizing the information, Calculations, Solution completion, and Solution accuracy. A new case study compares Textbook and YouTube problems related to reacting systems with recycle, which is one of the most difficult course concepts. A correlation between problem rigor and problem solving was found.

Asogwa, U., & Duckett, T. R., & Malefyt, A. P., & Mentzer, G. A., & Liberatore, M. W. (2021, July), Problem Solving and Difficulty Perception in YouTube Problems Involving Reacting Systems with Recycle Paper presented at 2021 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access, Virtual Conference. https://strategy.asee.org/37602

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