Asee peer logo

Problem Solving When Using Student-Written YouTube Problems

Download Paper |

Conference

2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Tampa, Florida

Publication Date

June 15, 2019

Start Date

June 15, 2019

End Date

June 19, 2019

Conference Session

Problem Solving and Communication in Chemical Engineering

Tagged Division

Chemical Engineering

Page Count

13

DOI

10.18260/1-2--33193

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/33193

Download Count

193

Request a correction

Paper Authors

biography

Uchenna Asogwa University of Toledo Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0003-0447-5938

visit author page

Uchenna Asogwa is a graduate student of Chemical Engineering at the University of Toledo. He earned a B.S. degree from the University of Benin, Nigeria in chemical engineering. His current research involves the reverse engineering online videos as well as rheology of complex fluids.

visit author page

biography

Matthew W. Liberatore University of Toledo Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-5495-7145

visit author page

Matthew W. Liberatore is a Professor of Chemical Engineering at the University of Toledo. He earned a B.S. degree from the University of Illinois at Chicago and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, all in chemical engineering. His current research involves the rheology of complex fluids as well as active learning, reverse engineering online videos, and interactive textbooks. His website is: http://www.utoledo.edu/engineering/chemical-engineering/liberatore/

visit author page

biography

Amanda Portis Malefyt Trine University

visit author page

Amanda Malefyt is currently Chair and Associate professor in the McKetta Department of Chemical and Bioprocess Engineering at Trine University. She received her bachelor’s degree from Trine (formerly Tri-State) University and Ph.D. from Michigan State University. Her research interests include engineering education and nucleic acid therapeutics.

visit author page

biography

Timothy Ryan Duckett Acumen Research and Evaluation, LLC Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0001-8060-6149

visit author page

T. Ryan Duckett is a research associate with Acumen Research and Evaluation, LLC., a program evaluation and grant writing company that specializes in STEM and early childhood education. He is a PhD student in the Research and Measurement department at the University of Toledo.

visit author page

Download Paper |

Abstract

Problem solving is a signature skill of engineers. Here, problem solving is employed when students apply course concepts to reverse engineer YouTube videos and solve new student-written, homework-style problems (YouTube problems). Replacing textbook problems with YouTube problems, this research focuses on examining the rigor of YouTube problems as well as students’ problem-solving skills on textbook and YouTube problems. A quasi-experimental, treatment/control group design was employed, and data was collected and evaluated using multiple measurement instruments. First, rigor of homework problems was examined using the NASA Task Load Index. Also, problem solving was assessed using a previously-developed rubric called PROCESS: Problem definition, Representing the problem, Organizing the information, Calculations, Evaluating the solution, Solution communication, and Self-assessment. PROCESS was modified to independently measure completeness and accuracy of student responses, as well as identify errors committed in material and energy balances. In the treatment group, students were assigned ten textbook problems and nine YouTube problems. While the control group obtained higher PROCESS scores at the beginning of the study, both groups exhibited similar problem-solving skills near the end. Also, the rigor of student-written YouTube problems was similar to textbook problems related to the same course concepts.

Asogwa, U., & Liberatore, M. W., & Malefyt, A. P., & Duckett, T. R. (2019, June), Problem Solving When Using Student-Written YouTube Problems Paper presented at 2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition , Tampa, Florida. 10.18260/1-2--33193

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2019 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015