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Reflecting on Reflection: How Educators Experience the Opportunity to Talk About Supporting Student Reflection

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Conference

2015 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Seattle, Washington

Publication Date

June 14, 2015

Start Date

June 14, 2015

End Date

June 17, 2015

ISBN

978-0-692-50180-1

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Faculty Development II

Tagged Division

Educational Research and Methods

Tagged Topic

Diversity

Page Count

24

Page Numbers

26.1323.1 - 26.1323.24

DOI

10.18260/p.24660

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/24660

Download Count

48

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Paper Authors

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Jennifer A Turns University of Washington

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Brook Sattler University of Washington

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Dr. Sattler is a Research Scientist for the Center for Engineering Learning & Teaching (CELT) and a Multi-Campus Coordinator for the Consortium to Promote Reflection in Engineering Education (CPREE) at the University of Washington. Her research interests include understanding and promoting self-authoring engineers.

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Lauren D. Thomas University of Washington

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Cynthia J. Atman University of Washington

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Cynthia J. Atman is the founding director of the Center for Engineering Learning & Teaching (CELT), a professor in Human Centered Design & Engineering, and the inaugural holder of the Mitchell T. & Lella Blanche Bowie Endowed Chair at the University of Washington. Dr. Atman is co-director of the newly-formed Consortium for Promoting Reflection in Engineering Education (CPREE), funded by a $4.4 million grant from the Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust. She was director of the NSF-funded Center for the Advancement of Engineering Education (CAEE), a national research center that was funded from 2003-2010. Dr. Atman is the author or co-author on over 115 archival publications. She has been invited to give many keynote addresses, including a Distinguished Lecture at the American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE) 2014 Annual Conference.

Dr. Atman joined the UW in 1998 after seven years on the faculty at the University of Pittsburgh. Her research focuses on engineering education pedagogy, engineering design learning, assessing the consideration of context in engineering design, and understanding undergraduate engineering student pathways. She is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and the ASEE. She was the recipient of the 2002 ASEE Chester F. Carlson Award for Innovation in Engineering Education and the 2009 UW David B. Thorud Leadership Award. Dr. Atman holds a Ph.D. in Engineering and Public Policy from Carnegie Mellon University.

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Richard Brown Bankhead III Highline Community College

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Adam R Carberry Arizona State University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0003-0041-7060

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Dr. Adam Carberry is an assistant professor at Arizona State University in the Fulton Schools of Engineering Polytechnic School. He earned a B.S. in Materials Science Engineering from Alfred University, and received his M.S. and Ph.D., both from Tufts University, in Chemistry and Engineering Education respectively. Dr. Carberry was previously an employee of the Tufts’ Center for Engineering Education & Outreach and manager of the Student Teacher Outreach Mentorship Program (STOMP).

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Kristine R. Csavina Arizona State University, Polytechnic campus

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Patrick Cunningham Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

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Douglas Karl Faust Seattle Central College

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PhD in Physics, professor of Mathematics, physics, astronomy and computer science.

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Trevor Scott Harding California Polytechnic State University

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Dr. Trevor S. Harding is Professor of Materials Engineering at California Polytechnic State University where he teaches courses in materials design, biomedical materials, and life cycle analysis. He has presented his research on engineering ethics to several universities and to the American Bar Association. He serves as Associate Editor of the journals Advances in Engineering Education and International Journal of Service Learning in Engineering. He serves as program chair for the Community Engagement Division of ASEE. Dr. Harding was invited to deliver a workshop on Ethics in the Engineering Curricula at the 2009 NSF Engineering Awardees Conference and to participate in the NSF Project Based Service Learning Summit. He received the 2008 President’s Service Learning Award for innovations in the use of service learning at Cal Poly. In 2004 he was named a Templeton Research Fellow by the Center for Academic Integrity. Dr. Harding received both the 1999 Apprentice Faculty Grant and 2000 New Faculty Fellow Award for his contributions to engineering education.

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Ken Yasuhara Center for Engineering Learning & Teaching, University of Washington

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Abstract

Reflecting on reflection: How educators experience the opportunity to talk about supporting student reflectionAs part of their research into the types of strategies that can help STEM education betteraccomplish its goals, Henderson, Beach, and Finkelstein identified the strategy of helping 1educators become increasingly reflective as teachers as an important area of activity. Thisraises the general question: What are ways to help educators become more reflective? Ofparticular interest to us is the question: How can we help educators grapple with the issue ofpraxis--the issue of bringing one’s beliefs in line with one’s activities?We have had the opportunity to think about how to help educators in the context of a projectthat is, on the surface, about finding ways to support student reflection. Our focus on studentreflection stems from the belief that learners need dedicated opportunities to reflect on theirexperiences in order to connect, learn from, and prepare for future experiences. While studentreflection is considered important, the engineering education community has historicallyfocused little dedicated attention to this issue. As a result, there is a lot to be learned abouthow to support student reflection. At the same, it seems likely that there are pockets ofexpertise among the educators around us.Recently, we have engaged several educators in individual discussions about activities thatthey use to help students engage in reflection. While our original purpose was to learn moreabout the activities, we see evidence of the impact such a discussion can have on theeducators and their practices. We now see that we have been inviting educators to reflect ontheir efforts to support reflection. The educators’ feedback has been that the opportunity totalk through one of their reflection activities was enjoyable, challenging, thought-provoking,and even eye-opening. In their comments about what made the experience valuable, theeducators have been noting issues that are reminiscent of praxis.In this paper we will use a “multiple perspectives methodology” to explore the question--how 2does talking about a reflection activity inform, change, or redirect current educators’ workand approach? A “multiple perspectives methodology” involves making diverse perspectivesvisible through first-hand accounts, and then identifying and explaining themes that areillustrated by the diverse perspectives. A core element of our proposed paper will be first-hand accounts of educators’ experiences with talking about their reflection activities. In thepaper, we will theoretically frame these accounts, and use both sequencing of these accountsand subsequent articulation of themes across the accounts to illustrate the potential for suchconversation to help the educators advance toward Henderson, Beach, and Finkelstein’s idealof being a reflective teacher.Henderson, C., Beach, A., & Finkelstein, N. (2011). Facilitating change in undergraduate1STEM instructional practices: an analytic review of the literature. Journal of Research inScience Teaching, 48(8), 952-984.Adams, R., Evangelou, D., English, L, Dias De Figueiredo, A., Mousoulides, N, Pawley, A.,2Schiefellite, C., Stevens, R., Svinicki, M., Trenor, J.M., Wilson, D.M.., (2011). MultiplePerspectives on Engaging Future Engineers, Journal of Engineering Education, 100(1), pp.48-88.

Turns, J. A., & Sattler, B., & Thomas, L. D., & Atman, C. J., & Bankhead, R. B., & Carberry, A. R., & Csavina, K. R., & Cunningham, P., & Faust, D. K., & Harding, T. S., & Yasuhara, K. (2015, June), Reflecting on Reflection: How Educators Experience the Opportunity to Talk About Supporting Student Reflection Paper presented at 2015 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Seattle, Washington. 10.18260/p.24660

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