Asee peer logo

Research Experience for Community College Students: Design and Optimization of Non-Volatile Latch using Resistive Memory Technology

Download Paper |

Conference

2018 ASEE Zone IV Conference

Location

Boulder, Colorado

Publication Date

March 25, 2018

Start Date

March 25, 2018

End Date

March 27, 2018

Page Count

15

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/29624

Download Count

39

Request a correction

Paper Authors

biography

Vladislav Valeryevich Miftakhov ASPIRES

visit author page

Vladislav Miftakhov is currently a junior at University of California Los Angeles in Los Angeles, CA, majoring in Electrical Engineering. His research interests include nanotechnology and bioelectronics and hopes to pursue a doctorate in these fields.

visit author page

biography

Cody Del Prato

visit author page

Cody Del Prato is currently an Aerospace Engineering student at San Jose State University in San Jose, CA. He obtained three A.S. degrees from the College of San Mateo and is a NASA Community College Aerospace Scholar Alumni.

visit author page

biography

Søren Anders Tornøe Cañada College

visit author page

Søren is currently a junior at Cañada College in Redwood City, California, working towards a degree in Biomechatronics. Research interest include designing and building an electroencephalograph like system for interacting in a virtual environment, generating neural feedback from said virtual environment to simulate all five senses, and the use of complex algorithms to perfectly duplicate the real world in a virtual environment.

visit author page

biography

Kwan M Lim San Francisco State University

visit author page

Kwan M Lim is currently a student at the Canada College in Redwood City, CA. In Summer 2017, he interned in an Electrical Engineering research group at San Francisco State University, where he worked on developing a non-volatile latch using Spin Transfer Torque Magnetic Memory technology.

visit author page

biography

ali attaran San Francisco State University

visit author page

Ali Attaran is pursuing his Master of Computer Engineering at San Francisco State University. His project focus is no developing and optimizing non-volatile memory arrays and look up tables with resistive memory devices.

visit author page

biography

Amelito G Enriquez Canada College Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-1259-0680

visit author page

Amelito Enriquez is a professor of Engineering and Mathematics at Cañada College in Redwood City, CA. He received a BS in Geodetic Engineering from the University of the Philippines, his MS in Geodetic Science from the Ohio State University, and his PhD in Mechanical Engineering from the University of California, Irvine. His research interests include technology-enhanced instruction and increasing the representation of female, minority and other underrepresented groups in mathematics, science and engineering.

visit author page

biography

Cheng Chen San Francisco State University

visit author page

Dr. Cheng Chen is currently an associate professor in the school of engineering at San Francisco State University. His research interests include earthquake engineering, structural reliability and fire structural engineering.

visit author page

biography

Hao Jiang San Francisco State University

visit author page

Hao Jiang received the B.S. degree in materials sciences from Tsinghua University, China, in 1994 and the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from the University of California, San Diego, in 2000.

Hao Jiang has been with San Francisco State University since August 2007 as an assistant professor in electrical engineering. Prior joining SFSU, he worked for Broadcom Corporation, Jazz Semiconductor and Conexant Systems Inc. His research interests are in the general area of analog integrated circuits, particularly in ultra-low-power circuits for biomedical applications.

visit author page

biography

Zhaoshuo Jiang P.E. San Francisco State University

visit author page

Zhaoshuo Jiang graduated from the University of Connecticut with a Ph.D. degree in Civil Engineering. Before joining San Francisco State University as an assistant professor, he worked as a structural engineering professional at Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM) LLP. As a licensed professional engineer in the states of Connecticut and California, Dr. Jiang has been involved in the design of a variety of low-rise and high-rise projects. His current research interests mainly focus on Smart Structures Technology, Structural Control and Health Monitoring and Innovative Engineering Education.

visit author page

biography

Kwok Siong Teh San Francisco State University

visit author page

Kwok Siong Teh received his B.S., M.S., Ph.D. degrees in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, and University of California at Berkeley in 1997, 2001, and 2004, respectively. He is currently an associate professor of mechanical engineering at San Francisco State University. His primary research interests are in: (i) the synthesis, characterization, and applications of metal oxides, conductive polymer, and low dimensional carbon nanostructures for energy generation and storage; (ii) engineering design pedagogy that incorporates makerspace, case studies, and scenario-based learning.

visit author page

biography

Xiaorong Zhang San Francisco State University

visit author page

Xiaorong Zhang received the B.S. degree in computer science from Huazhong University of Science and Technology, China, in 2006, the M.S. and the Ph.D. degrees in computer engineering from University of Rhode Island, Kingston, in 2009 and 2013 respectively. She is currently an Assistant Professor in the School of Engineering at San Francisco State University. Her research interests include embedded systems, wearable technologies, neural-machine interface, and cyber-physical systems.

visit author page

biography

Hamid Mahmoodi San Francisco State University

visit author page

Hamid Mahmoodi received his Ph.D. degree in electrical and computer engineering from Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, in 2005. He is currently a professor of electrical and computer engineering in the School of Engineering at San Francisco State University. His research interests include low-power, reliable, and high-performance circuit design in nano-electronic technologies. He has published more than one hundred technical papers in journals and conferences and holds five U.S. patents. He was a co-recipient of the 2008 SRC Inventor Recognition Award, the 2006 IEEE Circuits and Systems Society VLSI Transactions Best Paper Award, 2005 SRC Technical Excellence Award, and the Best Paper Award of the 2004 International Conference on Computer Design. He has served on technical program committees of Custom Integrated Circuits Conference, International Symposium on Low Power Electronics Design, and International Symposium on Quality Electronics Design.

visit author page

biography

Hamid Shahnasser San Francisco State University

visit author page

Hamid Shahnasser received the B.E. degree in electrical engineering from McGill University, Montreal, MS degree in electrical and computer engineering from Carnegie-Mellon University and his Ph.D. from Drexel University Pennsylvania.

He is currently a professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at San Francisco State University and the Engineering graduate program coordinator. His areas of interest are communication networks and computer systems. Dr. Shahnasser has been a research faculty consultant to NASA Ames Research Center projects since 1990 and has collaborated on several research grants with that organization since then. He has received grants from NSA, Department of Education, National Science Foundation and various private companies carrying out research in the areas of his interest.

visit author page

biography

Wenshen Pong P.E. San Francisco State University

visit author page

Wenshen Pong received his Ph.D. in Structural Engineering from the State University of New York at Buffalo. He joined the School of Engineering at San Francisco State University in 1998. He teaches courses in Civil/Structural Engineering.

Dr. Pong is a registered Professional Engineer in California. He is a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers and the Structural Engineers Association of California. He has published over fifty technical papers in the areas of Structural Control and Earthquake Engineering. Dr. Pong has been the Director of the School of Engineering at SFSU with 20 full-time faculty and over 25 part-time faculty since 2009.

visit author page

Download Paper |

Abstract

Research experience is enriching and inspiring for undergraduate students. Traditional curriculum postpones conduct of research by students to graduate level. In this paper, we present a flipped approach in which undergraduate students are exposed to research early on. Given the often-lengthy background preparation needed for conduct of research, it is difficult to incorporate research experience as a curricular activity in regular semesters when students have a lot of discretions managing various assignments by different courses. To address this challenge, we have developed summer research opportunities for community college students. Summer is a time when students have less distractions and can be effectively engaged in a focused research activity. The research internship is planned over 10 weeks of summer, and the student interns are assigned a graduate student mentor and a faculty advisor. This paper presents the details of this project, research and educational objectives, results obtained, and the student surveys assessing the outcomes. The planned research project is related to non-volatile resistive memory technologies, which are promising nano-scale technologies for information storage. In such technologies, the information is stored in a resistive form which is a state of a material that is non-volatile and also much more scalable as compared to the existing charge based storage technologies such as SRAM, DRAM, and flash. The main target application of resistive memory technologies is for large data storage and the main targeted market is replacement of computer DRAM main memory and SRAM cache. In this research, we propose a unique application for resistive memory technology and that is to realize non-volatile single-bit latch element that can be used for building reconfigurable logic circuits. The results of student surveys on the experience of student participants with the research internship strongly suggest that such an experience is very valuable in helping the students decide if they want to purse STEM research careers. Moreover, this experience enhances students’ technical research skills such as scientific thinking, ability to analyze and interpret results, and presentation skills. This flipped approach to educational pathways in which research experience is offered early on results in students to be more determined and motivated as they progress through their educational pathways.

Miftakhov, V. V., & Del Prato, C., & Tornøe, S. A., & Lim, K. M., & attaran, A., & Enriquez, A. G., & Chen, C., & Jiang, H., & Jiang, Z., & Teh, K. S., & Zhang, X., & Mahmoodi, H., & Shahnasser, H., & Pong, W. (2018, March), Research Experience for Community College Students: Design and Optimization of Non-Volatile Latch using Resistive Memory Technology Paper presented at 2018 ASEE Zone IV Conference, Boulder, Colorado. https://peer.asee.org/29624

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2018 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015