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Significant Improvements In Statewide Test Results As A Consequence Of Using A Japanese Based Supplemental Mathematics System, Kumon Mathematics, In An Inner Urban School District

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Conference

2005 Annual Conference

Location

Portland, Oregon

Publication Date

June 12, 2005

Start Date

June 12, 2005

End Date

June 15, 2005

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Math and K-12-Freshman Transitions

Page Count

8

Page Numbers

10.1117.1 - 10.1117.8

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/15405

Download Count

182

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Paper Authors

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Mark Jackson

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Jesse Petway

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Doreen Lawrence

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Patrick Dessert

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Barbara Oakley

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Significant Improvements in Statewide Test Results As A Consequence of Using A Japanese-Based Supplemental Mathematics System, Kumon Mathematics, in an Inner-Urban School District

by Barbara Oakley*, Doreen Lawrence**, Jesse Petway***, Mark Jackson***, Pat Dessert*, Darrin Hanna*

* School of Engineering and Computer Science, Oakland University, Rochester, MI 48306/**Kumon, North America, Inc., Glenpointe Centre East-5th Floor, 300 Frank W. Burr Boulevard, Teaneck, NJ, 07666/***School District of Pontiac, Odell Naila Administration Building, 47200 Woodward Avenue, Pontiac, Michigan, 48342

Abstract This paper provides an evaluation of the effects of using the “Kumon” method for supplementing the teaching of mathematics in the inner-urban school district of Pontiac, Michigan. Michigan Educational Assessment Program (MEAP) test scores are cited for Herrington, Owen, and Crofoot elementary schools, which used the Kumon program during part of their ninety minutes of daily mathematics instruction, and demographically matched Emerson Elementary School, which did not use the Kumon program during its ninety minutes of daily mathematics instruction. In 2003, Emerson had 4.5% of its students exceed Michigan standards. In 2004 that number was 8.6%. At Herrington Elementary School, however, the MEAP scores rose from 39.7% to 89.1% of students exceeding state standards during the same single year period. Crofoot went from 0.0% of students exceeding Michigan state standards in 2003, to a remarkable 58.1% exceeding standards in 2004. Owen also showed substantive improvements.

The research project, a joint effort between Oakland University’s School of Engineering and the School District of Pontiac, reveals that supplementation with the Kumon method as a partial replacement for a traditional mathematics program appears to result in significant improvements in statewide Michigan Educational Assessment Program test scores for mathematics.

Background The Pontiac School District is an inner-urban school district located near Oakland University, in Oakland County, Michigan. The performance of Pontiac students on the mathematics section of mandated state tests (Michigan Educational Assessment Program—MEAP) and nationally normed tests is below that of students in surrounding, wealthy school districts such as Rochester and Avondale.1 To assist Pontiac in improving their students’ mathematics skills, Oakland University teamed with Kumon, North America, Inc. (KNA) to provide a supplemental mathematics program for approximately twenty minutes per day to each student in selected elementary schools. A “bottom up” approach—improving mathematics first in the elementary school, rather than high school

“Proceedings of the 2005 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright © 2005, American Society for Engineering Education”

Jackson, M., & Petway, J., & Lawrence, D., & Dessert, P., & Oakley, B. (2005, June), Significant Improvements In Statewide Test Results As A Consequence Of Using A Japanese Based Supplemental Mathematics System, Kumon Mathematics, In An Inner Urban School District Paper presented at 2005 Annual Conference, Portland, Oregon. https://peer.asee.org/15405

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