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SMARTER Teamwork: System for Management, Assessment, Research, Training, Education, and Remediation for Teamwork

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Conference

2012 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

San Antonio, Texas

Publication Date

June 10, 2012

Start Date

June 10, 2012

End Date

June 13, 2012

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

NSF Grantees' Poster Session

Tagged Topic

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Page Count

12

Page Numbers

25.1164.1 - 25.1164.12

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/21921

Download Count

22

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Paper Authors

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Matthew W. Ohland Purdue University, West Lafayette Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0003-4052-1452

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Matthew W. Ohland is Associate Professor of engineering education at Purdue University. He has degrees from Swarthmore College, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and the University of Florida. His research on the longitudinal study of engineering students, team assignment, peer evaluation, and active and collaborative teaching methods has been supported by more than $11.6 million from the National Science Foundation and the Sloan Foundation, and his team received the William Elgin Wickenden Award for the Best Paper in the Journal of Engineering Education in 2008 and multiple conference Best Paper awards. Ohland is Past Chair of ASEE’s Educational Research and Methods Division and an at-large member the Administrative Committee of the IEEE Education Society. He was the 2002–2006 President of Tau Beta Pi.

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Misty L. Loughry Georgia Southern University

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Misty L. Loughry received her Ph.D. in management from the University of Florida. She studies teamwork, team-member performance, peer evaluation, and peer control in organizations. Her work has been published in journals such as Organization Science, Small Group Research, Information & Management, Educational & Psychological Measurement, and the Journal of Engineering Education.

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Richard A. Layton Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

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Richard A. Layton is past Director of the Center for the Practice and Scholarship of Education and Associate Professor of mechanical engineering at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology. He received a B.S. from California State University, Northridge, and an M.S. and Ph.D. from the University of Washington. His areas of scholarship include student team formation and peer evaluation; persistence, migration, and retention in engineering education; and data analysis and visualization for investigating and presenting quantitative data. Elements of his teaching practice include formal and informal cooperative learning and informal inquiry-based, hands-on experiences in labs, mini-labs, and student workshops. For a decade, he has been the key developer of reform of the experimental-based curriculum in his department. Most of his courses and laboratories involve instructor-assigned teams and guided instruction for students to become more effective team members. He is a founding developer of the CATME/Team-Maker System, a free, web-based system that helps faculty assign students to teams and conduct self- and peer-evaluations. He collaborates with his technical communications colleagues in developing scaffolded communications activities for use in his disciplinary technical courses.

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Hal R. Pomeranz Deer Run Associates

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Wendy L. Bedwell University of Central Florida, Institute for Simulation and Training

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Wendy L. Bedwell is a doctoral candidate in the Industrial/Organizational Psychology program at the University of Central Florida (UCF). Bedwell earned a B.A. in psychology with a minor in business from James Madison University and a master's in distance education (M.D.E) from the University of Maryland. As a Graduate Research Associate at the Institute for Simulation and Training, her research and applied work focuses on enhancing adaptive collaborative performance through training. Bedwell’s emphasis is two-fold: enhancing training effectiveness by linking training characteristics to learning outcomes, and understanding membership fluidity and its effects on adaptive collaborative performance in collocated and distributed teams.

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Rebecca Lyons University of Central Florida, Institute for Simulation and Training

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Rebecca Lyons is a doctoral candidate in the Industrial and Organizational Psychology program at the University of Central Florida (UCF). She earned a B.S. in psychology from Davidson College in 2004. Lyons is a Graduate Research Associate at the Institute for Simulation and Training, where her research includes individual and team training, simulation, performance measurement, decision-making/adaptation, and theory development related to team macrocognition. Much of this work has related to teams working in complex environments, such as healthcare and military populations.

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Daniel Michael Ferguson Purdue University, West Lafayette

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Daniel M. Ferguson is a Graduate Student in the Engineering Education program at Purdue University. He received his B.A. in pre-engineering in a five-year BA/BS program at the University of Notre Dame and a M.B.A. and M.S.I.E. from Stanford University. Prior to coming to Purdue, he was Assistant Professor of entrepreneurship at Ohio Northern University. Before assuming that position, he was Associate Director of the Inter-professional Studies program and Senior Lecturer at Illinois Institute of Technology and involved in research in service learning, assessment processes, and interventions aimed at improving learning objective attainment. Prior to his University assignments, he was the Founder and CEO of The EDI Group, Ltd. and the EDI Group Canada, Ltd, independent professional services companies specializing in B2B electronic commerce and electronic data interchange. The EDI Group companies conducted market research, offered educational seminars and conferences, and published the Journal of Electronic Commerce. He was also a Vice President at the First National Bank of Chicago, where he founded and managed the bank’s market leading professional Cash Management Consulting Group, initiated the bank’s non-credit service product management organization and profit center profitability programs, and was instrumental in establishing the revolutionary EDI/EFT payment system implemented by General Motors. He is a two-time award winner of the Best Paper in Cash Management awarded by the Bank Administration Institute.

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Kyle Heyne University of Central Florida

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Institute for Simulation and Training

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Tripp Driskell University of Central Florida

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Tripp Driskell is a doctoral student in the Applied Experimental and Human Factors program at the University of Central Florida. He received his M.S. in human factors from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.

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David J. Woehr University of North Carolina, Charlotte

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David Woehr is currently professor and Chair of the Department of Management at the University of North Carolina, Charlotte. He has also served on the faculty at the University of Tennessee, and at Texas A&M University. Woehr has also served as a Visiting Scientist to the Air Force Human Resource Laboratory and as a consultant to private industry. His research on managerial assessment centers, job performance measurement, work-related attitudes and behavior, training development, and quantitative methods has appeared in a variety of books and journals, as papers presented at professional meetings, and as technical reports. Woehr currently serves as an Associate Editor for Human Performance as well as on the editorial boards for Organizational Research Methods, and the European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology. Woehr is currently serving as the Chair of the Management Department.

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Abstract

SMARTER Teamwork: System for Management, Assessment, Research, Training, Education, and Remediation for TeamworkThe rapid adoption of Team-Maker and the Comprehensive Assessment of Team MemberEffectiveness (CATME), tools for team formation and peer evaluation, make it possible toextend their success to have a significant impact on the development of team skills in highereducation. The web-based systems are used by 1600 faculty at 400 institutions internationally –the figure below shows the growth of the user base. 1600 The system has had 72,459 unique student users.  1400 Fitted curves are second order. 1200 Faculty  and staff 1000 Number 800 of users 600 Institutions 400 Sep 200 Oct. 2005 2011 0 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 Years since  software was releasedThis paper and its accompanying poster will describe strategies for broadening the scope of thosetools into a complete system for the management of teamwork in undergraduate education. TheSystem for the Management, Assessment, Research, Training, Education, and Remediation ofTeamwork (SMARTER Teamwork) has three specific goals: 1) to equip students to work inteams by providing them with training and feedback, 2) to equip faculty to manage student teamsby providing them with information and tools to facilitate best practices, and 3) to equipresearchers to understand teams by broadening the system’s capabilities to collect additionaltypes of data so that a wider range of research questions can be studied through a secureresearcher interface. The three goals of the project support each other in hierarchical fashion:research informs faculty practice, faculty determine the students’ experience, which, if wellmanaged based on research findings, equips students to work in teams. Our strategies forachieving these goals are based on a well-accepted training model that has five elements:information, demonstration, practice, feedback, and remediation.Different outcomes are expected for each group of people. For the students, individual outcomes,such as student learning, and team outcomes, such as the development of shared mental models,are expected. For the faculty, individual outcomes such as faculty learning and facultysatisfaction are expected. The outcomes for researchers will be community outcomes, that is,benefits for stakeholders outside the research team, such as generating new knowledge forteaming theory and disseminating best practices. Measuring these outcomes is the basis for theproject’s evaluation plan.

Ohland, M. W., & Loughry, M. L., & Layton, R. A., & Pomeranz, H. R., & Bedwell, W. L., & Lyons, R., & Ferguson, D. M., & Heyne, K., & Driskell, T., & Woehr, D. J. (2012, June), SMARTER Teamwork: System for Management, Assessment, Research, Training, Education, and Remediation for Teamwork Paper presented at 2012 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, San Antonio, Texas. https://peer.asee.org/21921

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2012 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015