Asee peer logo

Student Assessment of Active Learning Elements in 100-level Introductory Biomedical Engineering Course

Download Paper |

Conference

2018 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Salt Lake City, Utah

Publication Date

June 23, 2018

Start Date

June 23, 2018

End Date

July 27, 2018

Conference Session

Active Learning in BME, Session I

Tagged Division

Biomedical Engineering

Tagged Topic

Diversity

Page Count

16

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/31000

Download Count

56

Request a correction

Paper Authors

biography

Nicole L Ramo Colorado State University

visit author page

Nicole Ramo earned a B.Sc. degree in mechanical engineering with a concentration in bioengineering from Kettering University (Flint, MI, USA) in December of 2012. The experiential learning program at Kettering allowed Nicole to work as a research assistant at Henry Ford Hospital’s Bone and Joint Center (Detroit, MI, USA), where she developed a passion for research. Nicole is currently a doctoral candidate in The School of Biomedical Engineering at Colorado State University (Fort Collins, CO, USA). She has experience working as a graduate teaching assistant for computer aided engineering, biomedical engineering capstone design, and biomedical engineering introductory classes. Nicole’s engineering education interests include active learning, metacognitive thinking, and the use of technology platforms. Her doctoral research is focused on the material properties of spinal cord tissues to contribute to the understanding and treatment of spinal cord injuries.

visit author page

biography

Jasmine Erin Nejad Colorado State University

visit author page

Jasmine Nejad is a PhD student in the Biomedical Engineering program at Colorado State University (CSU). She completed her B.S. in Biochemistry and M.S. in Biomedical Engineering at Arizona State University. Her research is focused on low-cost biosensor systems and microfluidics for point-of-care applications. She is a Walter Scott, Jr. College of Engineering Graduate Teaching Fellow (GTF) for the 100-level introductory course for biomedical engineering at CSU. Her work in the GTF program focuses on improving retention rates in first- and second-year engineering students by better understanding how students learn and implementing novel teaching strategies in the classroom to improve learning outcomes.

visit author page

biography

Ketul C. Popat Colorado State University

visit author page

Dr. Popat is an Associate Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering/School of Biomedical Engineering at Colorado State University. Prior to that, he was working as a Research Specialist in the Department of Physiology at University of California, San Francisco. He has authored over 85 peer-reviewed publications in journals such as Langmuir, Biomaterials, Journal of Orthopedic Research, Journal of Biomedical Materials Research, etc. and has and h-index of 37. He has also presented his work at numerous national and international level conferences. He received his Ph.D. in Bioengineering from University of Illinois at Chicago in 2003, M.S. in Chemical Engineering from Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago in 2000 and B.E. in Chemical Engineering from M. S. University in India in 1998.

visit author page

biography

Kimberly Catton P.E. Colorado State University

visit author page

Professor of Practice
Civil and Environmental Engineering

visit author page

Download Paper |

Abstract

This study describes the results of implementing intermittent active group learning sessions in a traditional lecture-only introductory course. Approximately 1 out of every 5 class periods was devoted entirely to group active learning focused on reviewing, applying, or otherwise emphasizing important topics from the lectures. This approach required little modification of previously prepared lecture materials and minimized the in-class time lost to student group formation. At the mid-point and conclusion of the semester-long course, students were asked to complete surveys which assessed their opinion on the course structure, the value of the various types of learning activities used and the benefit of the active learning sessions in general. Results show that students felt the problem-solving activities helped them “understand/apply course material and/or learn more about biomedical engineering” better than the research-based and hands-on activities. Correlating student assessments with demographical information revealed significant effects of gender, age group, learning style, and study habits. This study provides an example of an initial step instructors can take to transition from a lecture-only to a more active course structure and suggests that this method may be best received by younger, male students, and/or those who are already predisposed to social learning. The significant effects of social study habits (e.g., working on homework or studying with their activity group instead of alone) underscore the benefits of consistent activity groups over the course of the semester.

Ramo, N. L., & Nejad, J. E., & Popat, K. C., & Catton, K. (2018, June), Student Assessment of Active Learning Elements in 100-level Introductory Biomedical Engineering Course Paper presented at 2018 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition , Salt Lake City, Utah. https://peer.asee.org/31000

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2018 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015