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Student Attitudes When Solving Homework Problems that Reverse Engineer YouTube Videos

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Conference

2020 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access

Location

Virtual On line

Publication Date

June 22, 2020

Start Date

June 22, 2020

End Date

June 26, 2021

Conference Session

Chemical Engineering in the Sophomore Year

Tagged Division

Chemical Engineering

Page Count

14

DOI

10.18260/1-2--35220

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/35220

Download Count

108

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Paper Authors

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Uchenna Asogwa The University of Toledo Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0003-0447-5938

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Uchenna Asogwa is a graduate student of Chemical Engineering at the University of Toledo. He earned a B.S. degree from the University of Benin, Nigeria in chemical engineering. His current research involves the reverse engineering online videos as well as rheology of complex fluids.

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Matthew W Liberatore The University of Toledo Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-5495-7145

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Matthew W. Liberatore is a Professor of Chemical Engineering at the University of Toledo. He earned a B.S. degree from the University of Illinois at Chicago and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, all in chemical engineering. His current research involves the rheology of complex fluids as well as active learning, reverse engineering online videos, and interactive textbooks. His website is: http://www.utoledo.edu/engineering/chemical-engineering/liberatore/

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Timothy Ryan Duckett The University of Toledo Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0001-8060-6149

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T. Ryan Duckett is a research associate with Acumen Research and Evaluation, LLC., a program evaluation and grant writing company that specializes in STEM and early childhood education. He is a PhD student in the Research and Measurement department at the University of Toledo.

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Gale A Mentzer Acumen Research and Evaluation, LLC

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Gale A. Mentzer, PhD, the owner and director of Acumen Research and Evaluation, LLC, has been a professional program evaluator since 1998. She holds a PhD in Educational Research and Measurement from The University of Toledo and a Master of Arts in English Literature and Language—a unique combination of specializations that melds quantitative and qualitative methodologies. She and has extensive experience in the evaluation of projects focused on STEM education including evaluations of several multi-million dollar federally funded projects. Previously she taught graduate level courses for the College of Education at The University of Toledo in Statistics, Testing and Grading, Research Design, and Program Evaluation.

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Abstract

Problem solving is a vital skill required to be successful in many engineering industries. One way for students to practice problem solving is through solving homework problems. However, solutions manuals for textbook problems are usually available online, and students can easily default to copying from solution manual. To address the solution manual dilemma and promote better problem-solving ability, this study utilizes novel homework problems that integrate a video component as an alternative to text-only, textbook problems. Building upon research showing visuals promote better learning, YouTube videos are reversed engineered by students to create new homework problems. Previous studies have catalogued student-written problems in a material and energy balance course, which are called YouTube problems. In this study, textbook homework problems were replaced with student-written YouTube problems. We additionally focused on examining learning attitudes after students solve YouTube problems. Data collection include attitudinal survey responses using a validated instrument called CLASS (Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey). Students completed the survey at the beginning and end of the course. Analysis compared gains in attitudes for participants in the treatment groups. Mean overall attitude of participants undergoing YouTube intervention was improved by a normalized gain factor of 0.15 with a small effect size (Hedge’s g = 0.35). Improvement was most prominent in attitudes towards personal application and relation to real world connection with normalized gain of 0.49 and small effect size (Hedge’s g = 0.38).

Asogwa, U., & Liberatore, M. W., & Duckett, T. R., & Mentzer, G. A. (2020, June), Student Attitudes When Solving Homework Problems that Reverse Engineer YouTube Videos Paper presented at 2020 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access, Virtual On line . 10.18260/1-2--35220

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