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Student problem solving on Textbook and YouTube Problems pertaining to Vapor Liquid Equilibrium

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Conference

2021 ASEE North Central Section Conference

Location

University of Toledo, Ohio

Publication Date

March 19, 2021

Start Date

March 19, 2021

End Date

March 20, 2021

Page Count

13

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/36351

Download Count

22

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Paper Authors

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Uchenna Asogwa The University of Toledo Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0003-0447-5938

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Uchenna Asogwa is a Ph.D. student in Chemical Engineering at the University of Toledo. His current research involves reverse engineering online videos, the rheology of complex fluids, and fuel cell membranes.

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Timothy Ryan Duckett The University of Toledo Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0001-8060-6149

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T. Ryan Duckett is a research associate with Acumen Research and Evaluation, LLC., a program evaluation and grant writing company that specializes in STEM and early childhood education. He is a PhD student in the Research and Measurement department at the University of Toledo.

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Matthew W Liberatore The University of Toledo Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-5495-7145

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Matthew W. Liberatore is a Professor of Chemical Engineering at the University of Toledo. He earned a B.S. degree from the University of Illinois at Chicago and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, all in chemical engineering. His current research involves the rheology of complex fluids as well as active learning, reverse engineering online videos, and interactive textbooks. His website is: http://www.utoledo.edu/engineering/chemical-engineering/liberatore/

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Abstract

Faculty often utilize homework problems as a means to help students practice problem solving. Recently, with textbook solutions manuals being freely available online, students are prone to copying/cheating, which can severely limit improvements in problem solving. One hypothesis is that YouTube problems could serve as alternatives to textbook problems to significantly reduce cheating and promote better problem solving. YouTube problems are student-written problems that were inspired by events in a video publicly available online. While our previous studies have showcased positive attitudes related to engineering, high engagement, and rigor of the YouTube problems, the current study examines a subset of problems related to one major course topic, namely vapor-liquid equilibrium. The cohorts include engineering students from a public university who were assigned homework problems as part of a material and energy balance course. Two constructs were explored: problem solving and perception of problem difficulty. The study adopted an established and validated rubric to quantify performance in relevant stages of problem solving, including problem identification, representation, organization, calculation, solution completion, and solution accuracy. While problem solving can be influenced by perception of problem difficulty, the widely used NASA Task Load Index was adopted to measure the problem rigor. This paper will compare textbook and YouTube problem with respect to overall problem-solving ability as well as in each stage of problem solving. Furthermore, we will investigate whether disparities exist in students’ perceptions when solving vapor-liquid equilibrium problems.

Asogwa, U., & Duckett, T. R., & Liberatore, M. W. (2021, March), Student problem solving on Textbook and YouTube Problems pertaining to Vapor Liquid Equilibrium Paper presented at 2021 ASEE North Central Section Conference, University of Toledo, Ohio. https://peer.asee.org/36351

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