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Student Recognition, Use, and Understanding of Engineering for One Planet Competencies and Outcomes in Project-based Learning

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Conference

2021 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access

Location

Virtual Conference

Publication Date

July 26, 2021

Start Date

July 26, 2021

End Date

July 19, 2022

Conference Session

Teaching In and Through Design, Maker Spaces, and Open-ended Problems

Tagged Division

Educational Research and Methods

Tagged Topic

Diversity

Page Count

17

Permanent URL

https://strategy.asee.org/37756

Download Count

38

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Paper Authors

biography

James Larson Arizona State University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0001-6651-7246

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James Larson is a graduate of Arizona State University, Polytechnic Campus. The general engineering program in The Polytechnic School takes a project-based pedagogical approach when designing the curriculum. James has previously researched influences for this program design in examinations of the Maker Movement. Previous contributions to ASEE on this subject include conference papers, "Supporting K-12 Student Self-Direction with a Maker Family Ecosystem" (2016) and, "Makers as Adaptive Experts-in-Training: How Maker Design Practices Could Lead to the Engineers of the Future" (2017). He has also performed a case study of the junior-level design course in this program, "Supporting Self-Directed Learning in a Project-Based Embedded Systems Design Course" (2020), which was published in a special edition of IEEE Transactions on Education. James now works as an independent consultant to entrepreneurs and small business owners to help design their ventures as learning-based organizations.

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Wendy M. Barnard Arizona State University

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Wendy Barnard is an Assistant Research Professor and Director of the College Research and Evaluation Services Team (CREST) at Arizona State University. Dr. Barnard received her Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where she focused on the impact of early education experiences and parent involvement on long-term academic achievement. Her research interests include evaluation methodology, longitudinal research design, STEM educational efforts, and the impact of professional development on teacher performance. Currently, she works on evaluation efforts for grants funded by National Science Foundation, US Department of Education, local foundation, and state grants.

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Adam R. Carberry Arizona State University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0003-0041-7060

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Dr. Adam Carberry is an associate professor at Arizona State University in the Fulton Schools of Engineering, The Polytechnic School. He earned a B.S. in Materials Science Engineering from Alfred University, and received his M.S. and Ph.D., both from Tufts University, in Chemistry and Engineering Education respectively. His research investigates the development of new classroom innovations, assessment techniques, and identifying new ways to empirically understand how engineering students and educators learn. He currently serves as the Graduate Program Chair for the Engineering Education Systems and Design Ph.D. program. He is also the immediate past chair of the Research in Engineering Education Network (REEN) and an associate editor for the Journal of Engineering Education (JEE). Prior to joining ASU he was a graduate student research assistant at the Tufts’ Center for Engineering Education and Outreach.

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biography

Darshan Karwat Arizona State University

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I am an assistant professor with a joint appointment in the School for the Future of Innovation in Society and The Polytechnic School at ASU, where I run re-Engineered, an interdisciplinary group that embeds peace, social justice, and environmental protection in engineering. I am originally from Mumbai, India, but feel equally at home in Michigan or Washington, D.C. (and now, the Valley!). I studied aerospace engineering (specializing in gas dynamics and combustion) and sustainability ethics at the University of Michigan. I then spent three years as a AAAS Fellow in Washington, D.C., first at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on the Innovation Team, where I worked on climate change resilience and low-cost air pollution sensors; and then at the U.S. Department of Energy in the Water Power Technologies Office, helping design and run the Wave Energy Prize.

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Abstract

Addressing local-to-global crises at the intersection of environmental protection, climate change, sustainability, and social justice will require new skills and competencies in practicing engineers, and the ability to learn from and work with non-engineers in society. Project-based learning provides one approach by which students can learn how to tackle, in open-ended and creative ways, important problems in the world. We examine the impact of a second-year project-based learning course on students’ understanding of environmentally and socially responsible engineering. We collected survey data from 122 students, and quantitatively and qualitatively analyzed the data through the lens of a newly developed framework called Engineering for One Planet (EOP). Our analyses show that the project-based learning course had a moderate to large impact on student competencies that comprise the EOP framework. We believe the EOP framework can be considered as a guiding framework in designing courses and curriculum to better prepare students for future engineering work.

Larson, J., & Barnard, W. M., & Carberry, A. R., & Karwat, D. (2021, July), Student Recognition, Use, and Understanding of Engineering for One Planet Competencies and Outcomes in Project-based Learning Paper presented at 2021 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access, Virtual Conference. https://strategy.asee.org/37756

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