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Students’ Perspective on the Effectiveness of Design-Based Curriculum during an International Design Project

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Conference

2015 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Seattle, Washington

Publication Date

June 14, 2015

Start Date

June 14, 2015

End Date

June 17, 2015

ISBN

978-0-692-50180-1

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Measuring the Impact of Community Engagement on Students

Tagged Division

Community Engagement Division

Page Count

13

Page Numbers

26.1436.1 - 26.1436.13

DOI

10.18260/p.24773

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/24773

Download Count

39

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Paper Authors

biography

Keilah Maria Tablante Bias University of Prince Edward Island

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Keilah Bias, a natural-born Filipino, is a third year Industrial Engineering Student, completing her degree with a cooperative education designation at Dalhousie University in Halifax Nova Scotia, Canada. She completed courses at Polytechnic University of the Philippines Civil Engineering Department, before she completed her Diploma in Engineering at University of Prince Edward Island in 2014. She has worked as a Teaching Assistant, tutor, and did several volunteer teaching jobs in the past, and one of her career goals is to become an educator, in addition to becoming a professional engineer.

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Daniel Larsen University of Prince Edward Island

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Daniel Larsen is a third year engineering student at the University of New Brunswick. He transferred to the University of New Brunswick after completing a two years engineering diploma, in his home province, at the University of Prince Edward Island (UPEI). While at the UPEI, as part of a group design project, Daniel worked with the Mikinduri Children of Hope Foundation, and coordinated the design of a new charcoal press.

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Libby Osgood P. Eng UPEI & Dalhousie University

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Libby Osgood is an Assistant Professor at the University of Prince Edward Island in Canada, where she teaches dynamics and design courses. Concurrently, she is pursuing her PhD in Mechanical Engineering at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Her research interests include active learning pedagogy, service learning, and social justice.

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Alex Gamble University of Prince Edward Island

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Alex Gamble is a third year engineering student at the University of Prince Edward Island (UPEI). Coming from the small rural community of Alaska, PE, Alex will be transferring to the University of New Brunswick to study mechanical engineering after his completion of the UPEI Engineering Diploma in May 2015. During his second year at UPEI, Alex was part of the four-person design team responsible for developing a better charcoal production system for rural Kenyan farmers. Through their client, Mikinduri Children of Hope Foundation, this team worked diligently to develop a more cost and energy efficient, user-friendly, and greater yield producing charcoal briquette press. This charcoal briquette press design project won the Best Design Team award at the 2014 Engineers PEI Design Expo.

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Spencer Paul Montgomery University of New Brunswick

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Spencer Montgomery grew up in Kensington, PEI and graduated high school from Brewster Academy in Wolfeboro, NH in May, 2011. Spencer completed the Engineering Diploma program at the University of Prince Edward Island in April, 2014. While attending UPEI, his second year design group was able to work with the Mikinduri Children of Hope to design a charcoal press that would assist farmers in Kenya. Their final product and expo presentation was awarded the 2014 Engineers PEI Design Team Award. Spencer is currently in his third year of Civil Engineering at the University of New Brunswick in Fredericton, NB where he is a member of the UNB Baseball team.

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Abstract

Student Perspective on the Design Process of a Charcoal Press for Kenyan FarmersThere is scarcity of fuel sources in rural communities of developing countries which requiresmaximizing available resources. A process to convert agricultural waste into charcoal briquettesis currently in place, but it is manual, time consuming and has low productivity. This paperpresents the research, ideation, analysis, and testing conducted during a two-semester designproject to develop a mechanical charcoal press to expedite charcoal production. The authors,second year engineering students, collaborated with a local non-profit organization that providessupport to rural communities in Kenya. This partnership allowed valuable input from the endusers and culminated in sending a prototype to be field tested in Mikinduri, Kenya. Throughadvances in communication, the results of the field test were immediately incorporated into thedesign. After several iterations, the final design, a Levered Press, improved the charcoal pressingprocess by increasing time efficiency, reducing energy input by the user and producing betteryield. The project involved various cultural and behavioral factors that are usually leastconsidered in undergraduate engineering design projects, which opened a global perspective tothe authors regarding the role of engineering in remote communities. This paper will discuss theprocess the students used to develop the device, describe the interactions between the end usersand the designers and how this project provided innovative ways to design a solution for remoteclients.

Bias, K. M. T., & Larsen, D., & Osgood, L., & Gamble, A., & Montgomery, S. P. (2015, June), Students’ Perspective on the Effectiveness of Design-Based Curriculum during an International Design Project Paper presented at 2015 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Seattle, Washington. 10.18260/p.24773

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