Asee peer logo

Taking Stock: Progress Toward Educating the Next Generation of Engineers

Download Paper |

Conference

2012 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

San Antonio, Texas

Publication Date

June 10, 2012

Start Date

June 10, 2012

End Date

June 13, 2012

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Thinking About the Engineering Curriculum

Tagged Division

Educational Research and Methods

Page Count

26

Page Numbers

25.1233.1 - 25.1233.26

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/21990

Download Count

21

Request a correction

Paper Authors

biography

Peter H. Meckl Purdue University

visit author page

Peter H. Meckl is a professor in the School of Mechanical Engineering, where he has served since 1988. Meckl obtained his B.S.M.E. from Northwestern University and M.S.M..E and Ph.D. degrees from MIT. His research interests are primarily in dynamics and control of machines, with emphasis on vibration reduction, motion control, and engine diagnostics. His teaching responsibilities include courses in systems modeling, measurement systems, and control. In addition, he teaches a course entitled technology and values, which introduces students to the social and environmental impacts of technology through a series of readings and discussions. He currently serves as the Co-chair of a Strategic Planning initiative entitled "Grand Challenge Design" to introduce multidisciplinary design experiences in the College of Engineering.

visit author page

author page

Marc H. Williams Purdue University, West Lafayette

biography

Carolyn Percifield Purdue University

visit author page

College of Engineering

visit author page

author page

Monica E. Cardella Purdue University, West Lafayette Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/https://0000-0002-4229-6183

biography

Michael T. Harris Purdue University, West Lafayette

visit author page

Michael Harris is the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Education and professor of chemical engineering at Purdue University. He serves as Program Chair for the Minorities in Engineering Division of ASEE for the 2011 and 2012. He is a Fellow of the American Institute for Chemical Engineers. He earned a B.S. degree in chemical engineering from Mississippi State University, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Tennessee. He has been a researcher at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and faculty member at the University of Maryland, College Park.

visit author page

biography

Leah H. Jamieson Purdue University, West Lafayette

visit author page

Leah Jamieson is the John A. Edwardson Dean of Engineering at Purdue University, Ransburg Distinguished Professor of electrical and computer engineering, and holds a courtesy appointment in Purdue’s School of Engineering Education. She served as 2007 President and CEO of the IEEE. She is co-recipient of the 2005 NAE Bernard M. Gordon Prize for Innovation in Engineering and Technology Education for the creation and dissemination of EPICS. Jamieson is a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences and the U.S. NAE and a Fellow of ASEE and IEEE.

visit author page

Download Paper |

Abstract

Taking Stock: Progress toward Educating the Next Generation ofEngineersAt the 2011 ASEE Conference in Vancouver BC, two sponsored sessions were devoted to progress towardachieving the aim of adapting engineering education to the new realities of the 21st Century world.Before the conference, a survey was distributed to more than 3000 recipients to collect information about howuniversities worldwide define the "Future Engineer." It also aimed to uncover challenges and success factorsthat should be considered in order to effectively and sustainably integrate the ideals of the "Future Engineer"into the curriculum.Each of the two sessions at the 2011 conference started with a presentation that summarized the survey results.This was followed by group discussions focusing on 8 topics that had been selected based on the outcome of thesurvey. This paper is intended to summarize the results of the survey as well as the discussions from sessionparticipants.BackgroundThe world economy is changing and the engineering profession is evolving to keep up. The way we make newengineers must change accordingly. • 2000: ABET mandated including “professional outcomes” in the engineering accreditation criteria • 2004: the National Academy of Engineering issued a sequence of publications, The Engineer of 2020: Visions of Engineering in the New Century” and its sequel, Educating the Engineer of 2020: Adapting Engineering Education to the New Century.In response to these and other pressures, many schools have undertaken to make changes in the way newengineers are made. For example: • In 2005, Purdue initiated what is now called the “Purdue Engineer of 2020” project, which has largely been focused on curricular content. • The University of Illinois along with Olin College partnered in its “Engineer of the Future” program, which is focused on innovation in delivery mode and student engagement. • MIT instituted a sweeping change in approach in its CDIO program, which has found followers all over the world.Many other schools have undertaken similar projects with a variety of goals. One of the goals of the survey wasto make a better accounting of these efforts.Survey ResultsA total of 355 surveys were returned, some with incomplete information. The 204 usable responses represented136 different colleges and universities and 2 high schools. 77% of the respondents were from the US, 23%from outside the US.The majority of respondents indicated that their institution was involved in some curriculum change, most oftenat the college- or department-level. Changes were often sought to allow for an academic experience that ismore relevant/practical and grounded in hands-on/experiential and/or interdisciplinary learning. The biggestobstacles to change (time, money, faculty, etc.) were neutralized when leadership and support was present fromBOTH faculty and upper administration.Session Discussion OutcomesAs a result of survey responses, a total of 8 discussion topics were identified: 1. Distributing design through the curriculum 2. Achieving truly multidisciplinary experiences 3. Achieving meaningful global competency 4. Moving beyond traditional lecture 5. Integrating professional skills 6. Streamlining the curriculum 7. Developing strategies for effective change 8. Developing engineering faculty for the 21st centuryA round table was set up for each discussion topic, so that up to 6 people could participate in discussing thetopic. A facilitator was chosen for each table to keep participants on task. Attendees were asked to identify thecurrent state of each topic, as well as the desired change state. Then they were asked to comment on the prosand cons of each. Finally, they were asked to list strategies for achieving the benefits of the change state.More details regarding the outcomes of these discussions will be included in the paper.

Meckl, P. H., & Williams, M. H., & Percifield, C., & Cardella, M. E., & Harris, M. T., & Jamieson, L. H. (2012, June), Taking Stock: Progress Toward Educating the Next Generation of Engineers Paper presented at 2012 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, San Antonio, Texas. https://peer.asee.org/21990

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2012 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015