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The Development of Product Archaeology as a Platform for Contextualizing Engineering Design

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Conference

2013 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Atlanta, Georgia

Publication Date

June 23, 2013

Start Date

June 23, 2013

End Date

June 26, 2013

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

NSF Grantees' Poster Session

Tagged Topic

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Page Count

17

Page Numbers

23.1186.1 - 23.1186.17

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/22571

Download Count

21

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Paper Authors

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Kemper Lewis University at Buffalo, SUNY

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Deborah A. Moore-Russo Ph.D. University at Buffalo, SUNY

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Prior to joining the Graduate School of Education at the University at Buffalo, Dr. Moore-Russo taught in a Department of Mathematics for thirteen years. Her primary research interests include spatial visualization, communication, and reasoning.

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Gül E. Okudan Kremer Pennsylvania State University, University Park

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Dr. Gül E. Okudan Kremer is an associate professor of Engineering and Industrial Engineering at Pennsylvania State University. Her research focuses on decision analysis and design theory applied to improvement of products and systems. She has co-authored over 200 peer-reviewed papers to date and received several best paper awards. She has been also a National Research Council-US AFRL Summer Faculty Fellow of the Human Effectiveness Directorate for 2002, 2003 and 2004, and a Fulbright Scholar (2010-2011).

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Conrad Tucker Pennsylvania State University, University Park

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Timothy W. Simpson Pennsylvania State University, University Park

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Sarah E Zappe Pennsylvania State University, University Park

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Dr. Sarah E. Zappe is director of Assessment and Instructional Support in the Leonhard Center for the Enhancement of Engineering Education at Penn State University. In her current position, Dr. Zappe is responsible for supporting curricular assessment and developing instructional support programs for faculty in the College of Engineering. In her research role, Dr. Zappe is interested in the integration of creativity into the engineering curriculum, innovation, and entrepreneurship. Dr. Zappe holds a doctorate in Educational Psychology specializing in applied testing and measurement. Her measurement interests include the development of instruments to measure the engineering professional skills and using qualitative data to enhance the response process validity of tests and instruments.

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Ann F. McKenna Arizona State University, Polytechnic campus

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Dr. Ann F. McKenna is chair and associate professor in the Department of Engineering in the College of Technology and Innovation at Arizona State University (ASU). Prior to joining ASU she served as a program officer at the National Science Foundation in the Division of Undergraduate Education and was on the faculty in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Segal Design Institute at Northwestern University. Dr. McKenna received her B.S. and M.S. degrees in Mechanical Engineering from Drexel University and her Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley. Dr. McKenna also serves as a senior associate editor for the Journal of Engineering Education.

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Adam R Carberry Arizona State University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0003-0041-7060

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Dr. Adam R. Carberry is an assistant professor at Arizona State University in the College of Technology & Innovation’s Department of Engineering. He earned a B.S. in Materials Science Engineering from Alfred University, and received his M.S. and Ph.D., both from Tufts University, in Chemistry and Engineering Education respectively. Dr. Carberry was previously an employee of the Tufts’ Center for Engineering Education & Outreach and manager of the Student Teacher Outreach Mentorship Program (STOMP).

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Wei Chen Northwestern University

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David W. Gatchell Northwestern University

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Dr. David W. Gatchell is a clinical associate professor of biomedical engineering and mechanical engineering at Northwestern University. In addition, he is director of the Manufacturing and Design Engineering (MaDE) Program within the Segal Design Institute. Prior to joining NU, David was a research professor and instructor in the Biomedical Engineering Department at the Illinois Institute of Technology. He holds a Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering from Boston University and an A.B. in Physics from Bowdoin College.

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Steven B. Shooter Bucknell University

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Dr. Steve Shooter is a professor of Mechanical Engineering at Bucknell University where he has taught for eighteen years. He teaches classes such as senior design, exploring innovation, mechanical design, and mechatronics. His research is in information management in design, managing innovation and robotics. As a registered professional engineer in Pennsylvania he has consulted with dozens of companies on new product ventures and production infrastructure.

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Marie C Paretti Virginia Tech Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-2202-6928

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Dr. Marie C. Paretti is an associate professor of Engineering Education at Virginia Tech where she co-directs the Virginia Tech Engineering Communications Center (VTECC). Her research focuses on communication and teamwork in engineering, design education, and engineering identity. She was awarded a CAREER grant from NSF to study expert teaching practices in capstone design courses nationwide, and is co-PI on NSF. Her work includes studies on the teaching and learning of communication, the effects of curriculum on design cognition, the effects of differing design pedagogies on retention and motivation, the dynamics of cross-disciplinary collaboration in both academic and industry design environments, and gender and identity in engineering.

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Lisa D. McNair Virginia Tech

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Dr. Lisa DuPree McNair is an associate professor of Engineering Education at Virginia Tech where she also serves as assistant department head of Graduate Education and co-director of the VT Engineering Communication Center (VTECC). She received her Ph.D. in Linguistics from the University of Chicago and an M.A. and B.A. in English from the University of Georgia. Her research interests include interdisciplinary collaboration, design education, communication studies, identity theory and reflective practice. Projects supported by the National Science Foundation include interdisciplinary pedagogy for pervasive computing design; writing across the curriculum in Statics courses; as well as a National Science Foundation CAREER award to explore the use of e-portfolios for graduate students to promote professional identity and reflective practice. Her teaching emphasizes the roles of engineers as communicators and educators, the foundations and evolution of the engineering education discipline, assessment methods, and evaluating communication in engineering.

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Christopher B. Williams Virginia Tech

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Abstract

Assessment of Product Archaeology as a Platform for Contextualizing Engineering DesignAbstractEngineers in the U.S. face tremendous challenges that include globalization of technical labor,economic turmoil, environmental resource limitations, and the increasingly blurred lines betweenthe social and technical aspects of design. For over a decade, the NAE, NAS, NSF, and ABEThave identified engineering education as a principal site for inculcating future engineers withnew competencies to thrive in a globalized society. At the same time, they lamented about the“disconnect between the system of engineering education and the practice of engineering” thataccelerating global challenges have only exacerbated [1].Since 1996 the ABET Outcomes Assessment Criteria have offered a set of guidelines to assurethat engineers are equipped to succeed and lead in this new world [2]. Among the most vital ofthese criteria is Outcome h: “the broad education necessary to understand the impact ofengineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context”. Properlyunderstood, Outcome h goes far beyond contextual awareness. It provides the bond betweenvirtually all other ABET outcomes, linking the profession’s traditional strengths in scientificknowledge (Outcome a) with design (Outcomes b and c), multidisciplinary teamwork (Outcomed), and knowledge of contemporary issues (Outcome j). Outcome h is doubly important forengineering education because such global, economic, environmental, and societal issues havebecome critical for preparing, engaging, and retaining the nation’s best students [3,4].Despite its importance, engineering departments struggle to achieve Outcome h. As a result,engineering students receive meaningful contextual experiences in piecemeal fashion andgraduate with a lack of concrete competencies that bridge knowledge and practice in the globalworld in which they will live and work. By considering products as designed artifacts with ahistory rooted in their development, our product archaeology framework combines conceptsfrom archaeology with advances in cyber-enhanced product dissection to implement pedagogicalinnovations that address the significant educational gap.The term product archaeology was initially coined by Ulrich and Pearson [5] as the process ofdissecting and analyzing a physical product to assess the design attributes that drive cost. Morerecently we formally defined product archaeology as the process of reconstructing the lifecycleof a product—the customer requirements, design specifications, and manufacturing processesused to produce it—to understand the decisions that led to its development [6-10]. With an“archaeological mindset,” students approach product dissection with the task of evaluating andunderstanding a product’s (and its designers’) global, societal, economic and environmentalcontext and impact. These hands-on, inductive learning activities require students to movebeyond rote knowledge to hone their engineering judgment, extend and refine their knowledge,and apply their knowledge in meaningful ways to realistic challenges. This pedagogicalframework thus provides students with formal activities to think more broadly about theirprofessional roles as engineers.To connect to a learning framework we map Kolb’s four-stage learning model [11] to the fourphases of archaeology [12]: (1) Preparation, (2) Excavation, (3) Evaluation, (4) Explanation.The four keywords from Outcome h (i.e., global, societal, economic, environmental) are thenused as triggers to develop questions pertaining to a specific product, usage, and impact, Duringthe preparation phase, students reflect on what they know about the factors that impact thedesign of the particular product and postulate responses to questions about its design. Theexcavation activities lead to concrete experiences where students can physically dissect theproduct and perform appropriate research to develop well-reasoned answers to specific design-related questions. The evaluation phase provides opportunities for students to activelyexperiment and abstract meaning from their research and concrete dissection experiences.Finally, they articulate their findings during the explanation phase to describe the global,societal, economic, and environmental impact of the product.In this paper, we present scalable learning materials, strategies, and educational innovations thatwe are implementing to develop students’ understanding of the broader context of engineering.We also report on the assessment of the effectiveness of taking a product archaeology approachto teach students the necessary skills and knowledge to meet ABET outcome h. Data is collectedfrom six partner institutions across the undergraduate years to assess three dimensions ofthinking that influence the learning process: (1) extending and refining knowledge, (2) usingknowledge meaningfully, and (3) positive attitudes and perceptions about the learning context[13].References[1] National Academy of Engineering, 2005, Educating the Engineer of 2020: Adapting Engineering Education to the New Century, The National Academies Press, Washington, D.C.[2] Engineering Accreditation Commission, 1999, Criteria for Accrediting Engineering Programs, ABET, Baltimore, MD, http://www.abet.org/.[3] National Academy of Engineering, 2008, Changing the Conversation: Messages for Improving Public Understanding of Engineering, The National Academies Press, Washington, D.C.[4] Sheppard, S. D., Macatangay, K., Colby, A. and Sullivan, W. M., 2009, Educating Engineers: Designing for the Future of the Field, Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA.[5] Ulrich, K. T. and Pearson, S., 1998, "Assessing the Importance of Design through Product Archaeology," Management Science, 44(3), 352-369.[6] Lewis, K., Moore-Russo, D., Ashour, O., Kremer, G., Simpson, T. W., Neumeyer, X., McKenna, A. and Chen, W., 2011, "Teaching the Global, Economic, Environmental, and Societal Foundations of Engineering Design through Product Archaeology," ASEE Annual Conference & Exhibition, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, ASEE-1149.[7] Simpson, T. W., Okudan, G. E., Ashour, O. and Lewis, K., 2011, "From Product Dissection to Product Archaeology: Exposing Students to Global, Economic, Environmental, and Societal Impact through Competitive and Collaborative ‘Digs’," ASME International Design Technical Conferences - Design Education Conference, Washington, D.C., DETC2011- 48298.[8] McKenna, A., Neumeyer, X. and Chen, W., 2011, "Using Product Archaeology to Embed Context in Engineering Design," ASME International Design Technical Conferences - Design Education Conference, Washington, D.C., DETC2011-48242.[9] Lewis, K. and Moore-Russo, D., 2011, "Upper Level Engineering Design Instruction Using a Product Archaeology Paradigm," ASME International Design Technical Conferences - Design Education Conference, Washington, D.C., ASME, DETC2011-47933.[10] Cormier, P., Devendorf, E., Moore-Russo, D., and Lewis, K., 2011, “Using Product Archaeology to Integrate Global, Economic, Environmental, and Societal Factors in Introductory Design Education,” ASME International Design Technical Conferences - Design Education Conference, Washington, DC, DETC2011-48438.[11] Kolb, D., 1984, Experiential Learning: Experience as the Source of Learning and Development, Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ.[12] Renfrew, C. and Bahn, P., 2004, Archeology: Theories, Methods, and Practice, Thames & Hudson, New York.[13] Marzano, R. J., Pickering, D. and McTighe, J., 1993, Assessing Student Outcomes: Performance Assessment using the Dimensions of Learning Model, Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, Alexandria, VA.

Lewis, K., & Moore-Russo, D. A., & Okudan Kremer, G. E., & Tucker, C., & Simpson, T. W., & Zappe, S. E., & McKenna, A. F., & Carberry, A. R., & Chen, W., & Gatchell, D. W., & Shooter, S. B., & Paretti, M. C., & McNair, L. D., & Williams, C. B. (2013, June), The Development of Product Archaeology as a Platform for Contextualizing Engineering Design Paper presented at 2013 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Atlanta, Georgia. https://peer.asee.org/22571

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