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The Reality Show of a High School Science, Engineering, and Design Course: Observing Documentation and Communication Patterns to Inform Pedagogy and Assessment

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Conference

2012 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

San Antonio, Texas

Publication Date

June 10, 2012

Start Date

June 10, 2012

End Date

June 13, 2012

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

High School Students Thinking and Performance

Tagged Division

K-12 & Pre-College Engineering

Page Count

16

Page Numbers

25.1333.1 - 25.1333.16

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/22090

Download Count

19

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Paper Authors

biography

Tamecia R. Jones Purdue University, West Lafayette Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0003-4229-3975

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Tamecia R. Jones is a doctoral student studying assessment in K-12 formal and informal spaces at the Purdue University School of Engineering Education. She has a B.S. in biomedical engineering from the Johns Hopkins University and a M.A. in learning, design, and technology from Stanford University. She is a certified middle school math and science teacher and has created STEM outreach programs for a variety of K-12 populations.

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Monica E. Cardella Purdue University, West Lafayette Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/https://0000-0002-4229-6183

biography

Senay Purzer Purdue University, West Lafayette Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0003-0784-6079

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Senay Purzer is an Assistant Professor in the School of Engineering Education and is the Director of Assessment Research for the Institute for P-12 Engineering Research and Learning (INSPIRE) at Purdue University. Purzer has journal publications on instrument development, teacher professional development, and K-12 engineering education. Her research focuses on assessing constructs such as innovation, information literacy, and collaborative learning.

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Abstract

Using
Cultural
Technology
Behaviors
to
Teach
Documentation
in
a
High
School
Engineering
and
Design
Course

This
work‐in‐progress
is
the
first
phase
of
a
research
project
that
will
impact
assessment
in
K‐12
engineering
education.

Our
hypothesis
is
that
taking
advantage
of
the
texting
behavior
of
students
and
the
texting
language
can
improve
documentation
and
communication
in
engineering
and
design
courses.

A
coding
language
has
the
potential
to
address
the
challenge
of
assessing
working
knowledge
and
conceptual
knowledge,
and
provide
opportunity
for
increased
reflection.

This
paper
describes
the
first
phase
of
the
project,
a
four‐week
summer
course
that
teaches
science
and
engineering
concepts
in
the
context
of
design
to
rising
high
school
seniors
and
the
pedagogical
strategies
implemented
in
the
class.

Weekly
engineering
themes
that
include
specific
concepts
in
civil
and
electrical
engineering
set
the
stage
for
students
to
practice
the
design
process
in
order
to
solve
a
problem.



The
course
imitates
a
design
studio
with
studio
critiques,
brainstorm
sessions,
team
assignments,
and
impending
deadlines.

The
instructor
uses
various
forms
of
media
‐
design
journals,
design
storyboards,
and
video
‐
to
teach
reflection
and
document
student
understanding
and
individual
student
design
rationale.

Portfolios
of
student
work
contain
these
three
types
of
media
as
well
as
tests
and
quizzes.
Using
a
case
study
framework
and
content
analysis
methodology,
student
portfolios
will
be
analyzed
to
see
if
there
are
trends
in
documentation.

The
design
journals,
design
storyboards,
and
video
footage
from
final
presentations
are
compared
to
assess
the
benefits
of
using
different
media
(paper,
images,
and
video)
for
capturing
understanding
and
improving
the
reflection
and
documentation
practices
of
students.

Results
will
be
presented.





The
goal
of
this
data
is
to
generate
a
symbolic
graphical
language
that
can
be
used
as
a
pedagogical
strategy
and
tool
to
improve
documentation
of
the
design
rationale
in
high
school
science
design
or
engineering
courses.

The
outcome
of
this
phase
is
the
development
and
presentation
of
symbolic
graphical
language
that
can
be
piloted
in
classrooms
to
test
its
ability
to
improve
documentation
and
communication
between
students
and
instructors.








Jones, T. R., & Cardella, M. E., & Purzer, S. (2012, June), The Reality Show of a High School Science, Engineering, and Design Course: Observing Documentation and Communication Patterns to Inform Pedagogy and Assessment Paper presented at 2012 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, San Antonio, Texas. https://peer.asee.org/22090

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2012 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015