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The Wright State Model for Engineering Mathematics Education: Highlights from a CCLI Phase 3 Initiative, Volume 2

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Conference

2011 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Vancouver, BC

Publication Date

June 26, 2011

Start Date

June 26, 2011

End Date

June 29, 2011

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Tagged Topic

NSF Grantees

Page Count

15

Page Numbers

22.1517.1 - 22.1517.15

DOI

10.18260/1-2--18990

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/18990

Download Count

99

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Paper Authors

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Nathan W. Klingbeil Wright State University

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Nathan Klingbeil is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs in the College of Engineering and Computer Science at Wright State University. He is the lead PI for Wright State's National Model for Engineering Mathematics Education. He has been the recipient of numerous awards for his work in engineering education, including the ASEE North Central Section Outstanding Teacher Award (2004) and the CASE Ohio Professor of the Year Award (2005). He also held the university title of Robert J. Kegerreis Distinguished Professor of Teaching from 2005 - 2008.

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Scott Molitor University of Toledo

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Scott C. Molitor received his Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in 1997 and has been a faculty member in Bioengineering at the University of Toledo Department of Bioengineering since 2000. His research is in computational neuroscience, auditory neuroscience and traumatic brain injury. He has also served as the Bioengineering undergraduate program director since 2001.

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Brian W. Randolph University of Toledo

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Brian W. Randolph is the Associate Dean of Undergraduate Studies and Professor of Civil Engineering at the University of Toledo. He is the lead investigator for the UT adoption of WSU's National Model for Engineering Mathematics Education. He has received numerous awards for his teaching and professional activities, including the ASEE North Central Dow Outstanding Young Faculty Award, repeated department and college teaching awards and was named Toledo Engineer of the Year in 2005.

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Shane A. Brown Washington State University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0003-3669-8407

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Shane Brown is an assistant professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Washington State University. His research focuses on conceptual understanding of engineering students and practitioners and conceptual change processes that lead to differences in understanding.

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Robert G. Olsen Washington State University

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Robert G. Olsen is Associate Dean of the College of Engineering and Architecture for Undergraduate Programs and Student Services and the Boeing Distinguished Professor of Electrical Engineering at Washington State University, Pullman, WA, USA. He received the BS degree in electrical engineering from Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ in 1968 and the MS and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Colorado, Boulder, CO in 1970 and 1974 respectively. He is a Fellow of the IEEE, an Honorary Life member of the IEEE Electromagnetic Compatibility Society. He is past Associate Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Electromagnetic Compatibility and Radio Science. As the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Programs and Student Services he is responsible for oversight of the accreditation process, recruitment and retention of students, community college visitation, management of the scholarship program and services to university and state committees.

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C. Richard Cassady University of Arkansas

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Richard Cassady is Director of the Freshman Engineering Program and Professor of Industrial Engineering at the University of Arkansas. As Director of Freshman Engineering, he is responsible for overseeing the development and operation of both the academic and student services components of this first-year experience program for College of Engineering students. This program was introduced during the 2007 - 2008 academic year. Dr. Cassady is an elected member of the University of Arkansas Teaching Academy, and he has received numerous teaching awards including the Charles and Nadine Baum Faculty Teaching Award from the
University of Arkansas (2006) and the inaugural Imhoff Outstanding Teacher Award from the College of Engineering (2005). Dr. Cassady is a Fellow of SRE, a Senior Member of IIE, and a member of ASEE, Tau Beta Pi, and Alpha Pi Mu. Dr. Cassady received his B.S., M.S. and Ph.D., all in Industrial and Systems Engineering, from Virginia Tech.

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Abstract

The Wright State Model for Engineering Mathematics Education: Highlights from a CCLI Phase 3 Initiative, Volume 2AbstractThe inability of incoming students to advance past the traditional first-year calculus sequence is aprimary cause of attrition in engineering programs across the country. As a result, this paper willsummarize an NSF funded initiative at Wright State University to redefine the way engineeringmathematics is taught, with the goal of increasing student retention, motivation and success inengineering.The Wright State model begins with the development of a novel first-year engineeringmathematics course, EGR 101 “Introductory Mathematics for Engineering Applications.”Taught by engineering faculty, the course includes lecture, laboratory and recitation components.Using an application-oriented, hands-on approach, the course addresses only the salient mathtopics actually used in core engineering courses. These include the traditional physics,engineering mechanics, electric circuits and computer programming sequences. The EGR 101course replaces traditional math prerequisite requirements for the above core courses, so thatstudents can advance in the curriculum without first completing a traditional first-year calculussequence. The Wright State model concludes with a more just-in-time structuring of the requiredmath sequence, in concert with college and ABET requirements. The result has shifted thetraditional emphasis on math prerequisite requirements to an emphasis on engineeringmotivation for math.Since its inception in Fall of 2004, the Wright State model has had an overwhelming impact onthe retention, motivation and success of engineering students at Wright State University. As partof a CCLI Phase 3 initiative, the approach is now being piloted by more than 15 institutionsacross the country (primarily university, but also at the community college and K-12 levels).These institutions represent strategic pockets of interest in some of our nation's most STEMcritical regions, including Ohio, Michigan, Texas, Oklahoma, California, Maryland and Virginia.Last year's paper highlighted progress at a subset of these institutions, including the details oftheir diverse implementations and a preliminary assessment of their results. This year's paper(Volume 2) will highlight progress at several additional institutions, including at least oneinstitution not even funded under the CCLI Phase 3 award. It will also include the latest datafrom Wright State's own implementation, including its cumulative impact on first-year retention,as well as a first look at graduation rates for the initial cohorts.

Klingbeil, N. W., & Molitor, S., & Randolph, B. W., & Brown, S. A., & Olsen, R. G., & Cassady, C. R. (2011, June), The Wright State Model for Engineering Mathematics Education: Highlights from a CCLI Phase 3 Initiative, Volume 2 Paper presented at 2011 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Vancouver, BC. 10.18260/1-2--18990

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