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The Wright State Model for Engineering Mathematics Education: Highlights from a CCLI Phase 3 Initiative, Volume 3

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Conference

2012 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

San Antonio, Texas

Publication Date

June 10, 2012

Start Date

June 10, 2012

End Date

June 13, 2012

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

NSF Grantees' Poster Session

Tagged Topic

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Page Count

16

Page Numbers

25.1356.1 - 25.1356.16

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/22113

Download Count

55

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Paper Authors

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Nathan W. Klingbeil Wright State University

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Nathan Klingbeil is a professor of mechanical engineering and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs in the College of Engineering and Computer Science at Wright State University. He is the lead PI for Wright State's National Model for Engineering Mathematics Education. He held the University title of Robert J. Kegerreis Distinguished Professor of Teaching from 2005-2008, and served as the College's Director of Student Retention and Success from 2007-2009. He has received numerous awards for his work in engineering education, including the ASEE North Central Section Outstanding Teacher Award (2004) and the CASE Ohio Professor of the Year Award (2005).

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Karen A. High Oklahoma State University

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Michael W. Keller University of Tulsa

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Ian M. White University of Maryland

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Ian White is an Assistant Professor in the Fischell Department of Bioengineering at the University of Maryland. White received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Stanford University in 2002. He worked at Sprint's Advanced Technology Laboratories from 2002 to 2005. He then served as a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Missouri until 2008 before becoming a faculty member at the University of Maryland.

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Bradley J. Brummel University of Tulsa

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Bradley Brummel is an Assistant Professor of psychology at the University of Tulsa. His research focuses on the effectiveness of simulations, roleplays, and other high-involvement training across a variety of organizational and educational contexts. His educational training projects have included engineering, computer science, and law, as well as responsible conduct of research.

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Jeremy S. Daily P.E. University of Tulsa

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R. Alan Cheville Oklahoma State University

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Alan Cheville in interested in engineering education and high speed optoelectronics. He is currently an Associate Professor of electrical and computer engineering at Oklahoma State University and is currently serving as a program officer at the National Science Foundation.

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Jennifer Wolk University of Maryland, College Park

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Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Division

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Abstract

A National Model for Engineering Mathematics Education: Highlights from a CCLI Phase 3 Initiative, Volume 3AbstractThe inability of incoming students to advance past the traditional first-year calculus sequence is aprimary cause of attrition in engineering programs across the country. As a result, this paper willsummarize an NSF funded initiative at Wright State University to redefine the way engineeringmathematics is taught, with the goal of increasing student retention, motivation and success inengineering.The Wright State model begins with the development of a novel first-year engineeringmathematics course, EGR 101 “Introductory Mathematics for Engineering Applications.”Taught by engineering faculty, the course includes lecture, laboratory and recitation components.Using an application-oriented, hands-on approach, the course addresses only the salient mathtopics actually used in core engineering courses. These include the traditional physics,engineering mechanics, electric circuits and computer programming sequences. The EGR 101course replaces traditional math prerequisite requirements for the above core courses, so thatstudents can advance in the curriculum without first completing a traditional first-year calculussequence. The Wright State model concludes with a more just-in-time structuring of the requiredmath sequence, in concert with college and ABET requirements. The result has shifted thetraditional emphasis on math prerequisite requirements to an emphasis on engineeringmotivation for math.Since its inception in Fall of 2004, the Wright State model has had an overwhelming impact onthe retention, motivation and success of engineering students at Wright State University. As partof a CCLI Phase 3 initiative, various aspects of the approach are now being piloted by 15institutions across the country (primarily university, but also at the community college and K-12levels). These institutions represent strategic pockets of interest in some of our nation's mostSTEM critical regions, including Ohio, Michigan, Texas, Oklahoma, California, Maryland andVirginia. The dissemination component of the project has resulted in the addition of numerousunfunded collaborators, and the approach is now under consideration by at least two dozeninstitutions across the country.Our last two papers have highlighted progress at a subset of these institutions, including thedetails of their diverse implementations and a preliminary assessment of their results. This year'spaper (Volume 3) will highlight progress at several additional institutions, including at least oneinstitution not even funded under the CCLI Phase 3 award. It will also include the latest datafrom Wright State's own implementation, including its cumulative impact on student retentionand success from first-year through graduation.

Klingbeil, N. W., & High, K. A., & Keller, M. W., & White, I. M., & Brummel, B. J., & Daily, J. S., & Cheville, R. A., & Wolk, J. (2012, June), The Wright State Model for Engineering Mathematics Education: Highlights from a CCLI Phase 3 Initiative, Volume 3 Paper presented at 2012 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, San Antonio, Texas. https://peer.asee.org/22113

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