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Undergraduate STEM Students’ Role in Making Technology Decisions for Solving Calculus Questions and the Impact of These Decisions on Learning Calculus

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Conference

2020 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access

Location

Virtual On line

Publication Date

June 22, 2020

Start Date

June 22, 2020

End Date

June 26, 2021

Conference Session

Computers in Education Division Technical Session 4: Digital Learning Part II

Tagged Division

Computers in Education

Tagged Topic

Diversity

Page Count

13

DOI

10.18260/1-2--35413

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/35413

Download Count

118

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Paper Authors

biography

Emre Tokgoz Quinnipiac University

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Emre Tokgoz is currently the Director and an Assistant Professor of Industrial Engineering at Quinnipiac University. He completed a Ph.D. in Mathematics and another Ph.D. in Industrial and Systems Engineering at the University of Oklahoma. His pedagogical research interest includes technology and calculus education of STEM majors. He worked on several IRB approved pedagogical studies to observe undergraduate and graduate mathematics and engineering students’ calculus and technology knowledge since 2011. His other research interests include nonlinear optimization, financial engineering, facility allocation problem, vehicle routing problem, solar energy systems, machine learning, system design, network analysis, inventory systems, and Riemannian geometry.

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Hasan Alp Tekalp

biography

Elif Naz Tekalp

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My name is Elif Naz Tekalp. I am a junior industrial engineering student at Quinnipiac University. I also have mathematics and general business minor. I am interested in the role of mathematics in engineering education and professional life. I was very passionate about the research that I participated with my Dr. Emre Tokgoz.

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biography

Berrak Seren Tekalp BST

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My name is Berrak Seren Tekalp, I am from Turkey, and I am a junior in Industrial Engineering at Quinnipiac University. I have a mathematics and a general business minor. Beginning in my sophomore year, I’ve done many academic types of research with my professors. In these projects, I have used advanced features within the IBM SPSS Statistics and Excel programs. I am a hard and reliable worker. I have been able to expand my communication skills, and through my time as an active member of multiple student organizations and engineering groups at Quinnipiac. I’ve led numerous meetings and club projects. I am comfortable with working in teams.

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Abstract

There are challenging problems in STEM research that can be solved by using different technologies. STEM students are usually expected to have a good grasp of the paper-pencil solution to calculus questions to demonstrate critical thinking ability while they are also expected to use technology to determine solutions to these questions. The strategic use of technology by STEM majors enhances their engineering and mathematics learning. Technology education of students for making right decisions to pick the right technology for solving calculus questions is a crucial component of calculus education. There are many challenging problems that might require the use of one of the following technologies: • Computer programming languages: Matlab, Excel, etc. • Calculators: Texas Instruments 83, 83+, 84, 86, 89, 89-Titanium, etc. • Online resources: Wolfram Alpha, etc. The research results shared in this work received IRB approval for data collection. Qualitative and Quantitative data were collected during the research period for the following three research questions: Q1.If you are required to draw the graph of a given function by using technology, what kind of technology would you use? Please either choose one of the following or write your own answer and explain why. 1. Calculator (If this is your choice please specify the kind of calculator you use) 2. Excel 3. C 4. C++ 5. C# 6. Fortran 7. MATLab 8. LabVIEW 9. Other Q2.If there is a definite integral given, which one of the following would you prefer to use to calculate the given integral? Please circle the option and briefly explain why.

1.Computer Program (which program) 2.Calculator (which calculator) 3.By hand 4.Other (Please type) If you are required to use a computer program to find the solution of the given definite integral, which computer language would you prefer to use?

Q3.If you needed to calculate numerical values of power series or error term graphs/values which method (algebraic calculations, computer program (please specify), calculator etc.) would you use? If you are required to pick a computer program what programming language would you prefer to use? Please either choose one of the following or write your own answer and explain why. 1. Calculator (If this is your choice please specify the kind of calculator you use) 2. Excel 3. C 4. C++ 5. C# 6. Fortran 7. MATLab 8. LabVIEW 9. Other

In this work, the quantitative data analysis consisted of the statistical analysis of the participants’ responses to the research questions and the qualitative nature of the data is the transcription of the 20 participants’ video recorded interviews at a university located on the Northeast side of the United States. The focus of this research is different from majority of the other existing research that focuses on the learning preferences of students to solve engineering problems; (see for example Felder and Silverman (1988) and Rosati (1998).) Students’ preferences on using technology versus paper-pencil solution to solve the research questions is also investigated for improving technology education of STEM students with the impact on their calculus educational experience.

Tokgoz, E., & Tekalp , H. A., & Tekalp, E. N., & Tekalp, B. S. (2020, June), Undergraduate STEM Students’ Role in Making Technology Decisions for Solving Calculus Questions and the Impact of These Decisions on Learning Calculus Paper presented at 2020 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access, Virtual On line . 10.18260/1-2--35413

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