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Using Concept Building Context Modules With Technology And 5 E Pedagogy To Promote Conceptual Change In Materials Science

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Conference

2009 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Austin, Texas

Publication Date

June 14, 2009

Start Date

June 14, 2009

End Date

June 17, 2009

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Page Count

15

Page Numbers

14.1317.1 - 14.1317.15

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/4966

Download Count

34

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Paper Authors

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Jacquelyn Kelly Arizona State University

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Jacquelyn Kelley is a M.S. student in the School of Materials in the Fulton School of Engineering at Arizona State University. Her BS degree is in Physics and Chemistry Education. Her principle research areas are inquiry-based learning and development and assessment of inquiry-based modules in materials science and engineering. She teaches physics, chemistry and mathematics in a local arts high school.

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James Corkins Arizona State University

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James Corkins, Arizona State University
James Corkins is a Ph.D. student in Science Education, Department of Curriculum and Instruction at ASU. He earned his MS degree in Physics Education at Arizona State University. His BS degree is in Physics. His principle research areas are inquiry-based learning and characterization and measurement of conceptual change in thermodynamics and introductory materials science.

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Dale Baker Arizona State University

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Dale Baker, Arizona State University
Dale R. Baker is a Professor of Science Education in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction at ASU and is the Co-Editor of The Journal of Research in Science Teaching. She teaches courses in science curricula, teaching and learning, and assessment courses with an emphasis on constructivist theory and issues of equity. Her research focuses on issues of gende

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Amaneh Tasooji Arizona State University

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Amaneh Tasooji, Arizona State University
Amaneh Tasooji is an Associate Research Professor in the School of Materials at ASU and has been teaching and developing new content for materials science and engineering classes and laboratories. She has developed new content and contextual teaching methods from here experience as a researcher and General Manager at Honeywell Inc. She is currently working to develop new assessments to reveal and address student misconceptions in introductory materials engineering classes.

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Stephen Krause Arizona State University

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Stephen Krause, Arizona State University
Stephen J. Krause is Professor in the School of Materials in the Fulton School of Engineering at Arizona State University. He teaches in the areas of bridging engineering and education, design and selection of materials, general materials engineering, polymer science, and characterization of materials. His research interests are in innovative education in engineering and K-12 engineering outreach. He has been working on Project Pathways, an NSF supported Math Science Partnership, in developing modules for Physics and Chemistry and also a course on Engineering Capstone Design. He has also co-developed a Materials Concept Inventory for assessing fundamental knowledge of students in introductory materials engineering classes.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Using Concept-Building Context Modules with Technology and the 5 E Pedagogy to Promote Conceptual Change in Materials Science

Abstract

Recent advances in technology and pedagogy have demonstrated the potential for improvements in student learning. In this research we are report on the development of prototype teaching and learning modules for an introductory materials science and engineering course. At this time content and activities have been created for modules in two subject areas; atomic bonding and properties and also the area of solutions, solubility, and phase diagrams. Each module is being created as a textbook supplement that uses a technologically-enhanced and contextualized 5E Method (Engage, Explore, Explain, Expand, Evaluate) as the contemporary pedagogy for teaching, learning and assessing the topical content. The 5E Method is supplemented with technology in two ways. First, student class preparation (Engage) uses technology with pre-class, Just-in-Time-Teaching (JiTT) questions which can be web-submitted and will contextualize content with examples from students' everyday lives. This provides a learning bridge from concrete phenomena to the more abstract technical concepts of the content. The JiTT responses are, in effect, a formative evaluation that reveals student learning barriers such as misconceptions and misunderstood definitions. Additionally, students can be engaged (Explore, Explain, and Expand) with in-class Personal Response System Clicker (PRSC) questions. Question responses provide rapid feedback to the instructor and students and can reveal commonly held misconceptions that may hinder learning. The team-based, active-learning 5E pedagogy also utilizes Concept-Building Context Worksheets, which engage students with contextualized multiple representations of topical content that include: visual glossaries; macro/micro illustrations; sample data tables; graphical relationships; and controlling equations. Concept learning has been assessed the Materials Concept Inventory and concept-eliciting tasks that include two-tiered concept questions and concept sketching. The module for solubility, saturation and phase diagrams used content contextualization and concept visualization to promote conceptual change and was well received by a focus group. For a full class of 40 the activities and homework for the bonding module engaged students, improved content understanding, and also revealed unresolved misconceptions. Also, the structure of a module, and especially its concept-building context worksheet, have the potential to lower the barrier to faculty participation in active learning. The research background, construction, use and assessment of modules are described and highlighted with a few examples.

Introduction

In the study of materials science and engineering (MSE) it is found that the behavior of materials is often counterintuitive and, when "novice" learners use everyday experience to create the mental models that comprise their conceptual framework1, they may result in misconceptions. These are an individual's scientifically-inaccurate interpretations of the world that can neither explain nor predict phenomena nor properties. A typical example of a faulty mental model resulting in a misconception is "the malleable copper atom"2. In the study of materials it is

Kelly, J., & Corkins, J., & Baker, D., & Tasooji, A., & Krause, S. (2009, June), Using Concept Building Context Modules With Technology And 5 E Pedagogy To Promote Conceptual Change In Materials Science Paper presented at 2009 Annual Conference & Exposition, Austin, Texas. https://peer.asee.org/4966

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2009 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015