Asee peer logo

WIP: Engaging Pre-college Students in Hypothesis Generation Using a Citizen Scientist Network of Air Quality Sensors

Download Paper |

Conference

2020 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access

Location

Virtual On line

Publication Date

June 22, 2020

Start Date

June 22, 2020

End Date

June 26, 2021

Conference Session

Pre-college Engineering Education Division Technical Session 6

Tagged Division

Pre-College Engineering Education

Tagged Topic

Diversity

Page Count

14

DOI

10.18260/1-2--35538

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/35538

Download Count

118

Request a correction

Paper Authors

author page

James A. Moore

biography

Matthew Dailey

visit author page

Matthew Dailey is a student at the University of Utah pursuing a B.S in Chemical Engineering. He is pursuing graduate school with a focus on biosensors.

visit author page

biography

Zachary Wilhelm University of Utah

visit author page

Zachary Wilhelm is pursing his undergrad in Chemical Engineering at the University of Utah and is aspiring to get his PhD to continue research to understand and address environmental challenges. For this project his primary focus was organizing visits to local schools and attending outreach events to engage citizen scientists across the Salt Lake City valley.

visit author page

biography

Kerry Kelly University of Utah Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-2232-3092

visit author page

Dr. Kerry Kelly is a professional engineer, an Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering and Associate Director of the Program for Air Quality, Health, and Society at the University of Utah. She has a PhD in Environmental Engineering and a BS in Chemical Engineering, and she just completed 8 years of service on Utah’s Air Quality Board. Her research focuses on air quality and the evaluation of emerging energy technologies including consideration of their associated health, environmental, policy and performance issues. Most recently she has been focusing on combustion particles, their associated health effects, low-cost air-quality sensing, and community engagement.

visit author page

biography

Pascal Goffin University of Utah

visit author page

Pascal Goffin received his PhD in Computer Science from Université Paris-Saclay in France in 2016. During his PhD he worked for the Aviz visualization group at Inria. He holds a Masters degree in Computer Science from ETH Zurich in Switzerland. His interest span information visualization, text visualization, and human com- puter interaction. His current research focuses on how to support the communication of air quality in urban environments to citizens. He also builds tools to assist the exploration of urban air quality data.

visit author page

biography

Anthony Butterfield University of Utah

visit author page

Anthony Butterfield is an Assistant Professor (Lecturing) in the Chemical Engineering Department of the University of Utah. He received his B. S. and Ph. D. from the University of Utah and a M. S. from the University of California, San Diego. His teaching responsibilities include the senior unit operations laboratory and freshman design laboratory. His research interests focus on undergraduate education, targeted drug delivery, photobioreactor design, and instrumentation.

visit author page

visit author page

Jason Wiese is an Assistant Professor in the School of Computing at the University of Utah. His research takes a user-centric perspective of personal data, focusing on how that data is collected, interpreted, and used in applications. His work crosses the domains of machine learning, privacy, user-centered design, real-world data collection, and user study design. Dr. Wiese’s research excellence has been recognized by awards including: recognition as a Yahoo Fellow in 2014, the Stu Card Fellowship in 2012, a Carnegie Mellon Usable Privacy and Security IGERT trainee, and the Yahoo! Key Scientific Challenges Award in 2011. He publishes work in top Computer Science and HCI venues including CHI, CSCW, and UbiComp. He received his Ph.D. in Human-Computer Interaction from Carnegie Mellon University in 2015.

visit author page

author page

Wei Xing University of Utah

author page

Katrina Myquyen Le University of Utah

biography

Thomas Becnel University of Utah

visit author page

Thomas Becnel is working towards his Ph.D. in the Laboratory for NanoIntegrated Systems, led by Pierre-Emmanuel Gaillardon, in the department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA. He received the electrical engineering degree from the University of Utah, and the M.Sc. degree in computer engineering from the University of Utah in 2018. His areas of research involve the design of large-scale sensor networks, low-noise capacitive CMOS sensors, and advanced low-power communication techniques. He plans to graduate with a Doctorate of Philosophy in the field of computer engineering in 2021.

visit author page

author page

Pierre-Emmanuel Gaillardon

Download Paper |

Abstract

Communities of citizen scientists have proven themselves to be capable of contributing to research endeavors in meaningful ways, and on a scale that would be impractical for any traditional research group. High-quality data collection by P12 citizen scientists presents one set of hurdles, which have been the subject of significant citizen scientist research. However, important questions remain on how to best engage the same students within more complex cognitive domains, such as hypothesis generation and validation.

We have recruited P12 classrooms to becomes hosts in a network of distributed air quality sensors, across a community which experience some of the worst air quality in the United States. These classroom-hosted sensors are integrated into an infrastructure called AQ\&U that includes, in addition to the networked sensors, statistical models and visualizations for identifying and communicating pollution events at a community scale.

In this work we report on methods used to help students move from comprehension of their one sensor in one location, to analysis and evaluation of a vast network of data to which their one sensor contributes. Curated sets from impactful air quality events, including fireworks, wildfires, and inversions, are used in combination with visualization tools to advance students’ ability to generate and evaluate hypotheses about the air quality in their valley, and connect their conclusions to community governance. Survey and other observational data from classroom visits are used to assess the effectiveness of the developed teaching module and larger pre-college citizen scientist effort.

Moore, J. A., & Dailey, M., & Wilhelm, Z., & Kelly, K., & Goffin, P., & Butterfield, A., & Wiese, J., & Xing, W., & Le, K. M., & Becnel, T., & Gaillardon, P. (2020, June), WIP: Engaging Pre-college Students in Hypothesis Generation Using a Citizen Scientist Network of Air Quality Sensors Paper presented at 2020 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access, Virtual On line . 10.18260/1-2--35538

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2020 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015