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WIP: Student and Faculty Perceptions of Rotating Faculty Facilitators for Introductory Biomedical Engineering Problem-based Learning

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Conference

2020 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access

Location

Virtual On line

Publication Date

June 22, 2020

Start Date

June 22, 2020

End Date

June 26, 2021

Conference Session

Intro to Biomedical Engineering and Vertically Integrated Curriculum (Works in Progress) - June 23rd

Tagged Division

Biomedical Engineering

Tagged Topic

Diversity

Page Count

10

DOI

10.18260/1-2--35569

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/35569

Download Count

87

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Paper Authors

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Sara L. Arena Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

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Sara L. Arena is a Collegiate Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Mechanics (BEAM) at Virginia Tech (VT), where she has been teaching since 2017. Prior to this position, Sara was an Assistant Professor of Exercise Science at High Point University (2013-2017). The BEAM Department at Virginia Tech offers two undergraduate programs: (1) Engineering Science and Mechanics and (2) Biomedical Engineering. Sara teaches foundational courses and upper-level technical electives in biomechanics of human movement for both programs. In her current role, Sara has developed an interest in scholarship of teaching and learning, specifically related to the use of groups towards improving student achievement and attainment of learning outcomes. This includes cooperative, collaborative learning, and problem-based learning in foundational courses within both programs. Sara also continues to be active in research related to biomechanics of human movement.

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Melissa C. Kenny Wake Forest University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-6824-9377

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Dr. Melissa C Kenny is an assistant teaching professor in the department of Engineering at Wake Forest University.

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Andre Albert Muelenaer Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

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Yong Woo Lee Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

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Associate Professor
Department of Biomedical Engineering and Mechanics
College of Engineering
Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061

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Pamela Jean VandeVord Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0003-3422-2704

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Christopher Arena Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

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Chris is a Collegiate Assistant Professor at Virginia Tech in the Biomedical Engineering and Mechanics Department. He teaches senior design and quantitative physiology. Additionally, he is co-founder of VoltMed, a company dedicated to treating brain tumors with pulsed electric fields. Chris received his B.S. degree from the University of Virginia and Ph.D. degree from Virginia Tech, both in Biomedical Engineering. His research interests consist of therapeutic and diagnostic applications of directed energy, including electric fields and ultrasound.

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Abstract

Problem based learning (PBL) has been shown to be an effective teaching strategy, particularly for interdisciplinary fields such as biomedical engineering (BME). Due to the broad range of problems and disciplines within the biomedical field, it is desirable to develop and enhance problem-solving and teamwork skills early in undergraduate education. However, PBL requires a broad range of expertise and significant time investment for facilitation and feedback. These are difficult criteria to meet with small instructional teams and large introductory student enrollments. Therefore, we propose using rotating faculty facilitators to address these challenges. A preliminary execution of this strategy in an introductory BME course utilized 25 faculty and 8 graduate students from the Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Veterinary Medicine, and School of Medicine in a rotating facilitation schedule in addition to 2 full-time instructors and 1 graduate teaching assistant dedicated to course instruction. 98 students who are in a BME minor program were organized into 18 transdisciplinary teams and presented with three open-ended BME problems. These problems included assessing the validity and reliability of wearable health devices, benchmarking and recommending glioblastoma treatment for investment, and modeling and designing experimental studies towards development of pediatric medical devices. Currently, we aim to examine student and faculty perceptions of learning, problem-solving, and teamwork skills with the use of rotating facilitators within an introductory BME course. We will also aim to examine the influence of student population (BME major versus BME minor) on these perceptions.

Arena, S. L., & Kenny, M. C., & Muelenaer, A. A., & Lee, Y. W., & VandeVord, P. J., & Arena, C. (2020, June), WIP: Student and Faculty Perceptions of Rotating Faculty Facilitators for Introductory Biomedical Engineering Problem-based Learning Paper presented at 2020 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access, Virtual On line . 10.18260/1-2--35569

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