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Work in Progress: Assessing Motivation in Capstone Design Courses

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Conference

2017 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Columbus, Ohio

Publication Date

June 24, 2017

Start Date

June 24, 2017

End Date

June 28, 2017

Conference Session

DEED Postcard Session 1

Tagged Division

Design in Engineering Education

Page Count

24

DOI

10.18260/1-2--29145

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/29145

Download Count

248

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Paper Authors

biography

Peter Rogers The Ohio State University

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Dr. Peter Rogers is a Professor of Practice in the Department of Engineering Education The Ohio State University. He joined the university in October 2008 bringing with him 35 years of industrial experience. His career includes senior leadership roles in engineering, sales, and manufacturing developing products using multidisciplinary teams to convert customer needs to commercially viable products and services.
Rogers co-led the development of an ABET-approved year-long Capstone design experience. With a focus on providing students with a broader experience base, the multidisciplinary program applies teams of engineers, business, design, and other students to work with companies to help them be more competitive. Rogers expanded this one-year program to a four-year Integrated Business and Engineering (IBE) honors program.

Rogers earned his Ph.D. at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, focused on mechanical engineering and manufacturing.

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Denny C. Davis The Ohio State University

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Dr. Davis is Visiting Professor in the Engineering Education Department at The Ohio State University and Emeritus Professor of Engineering Education at Washington State University. For three decades, he taught engineering design and led multi-institution teams in the development and testing of curriculum materials and assessments for engineering design learning. He is also the owner of Verity Design Learning LLC, a publisher of instructional materials for design reviews and teamwork development. He is a Fellow of the American Society for Engineering Education. Dr. Davis received his PhD in Agricultural Engineering at Cornell University.

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Sarah Winfree The Ohio State University

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Sarah Winfree is an undergraduate research assistant in the Department of Engineering Education at The Ohio State University. She joined the University in August 2013 working towards a Bachelor of Science degree in Food Engineering. Her career includes motivating students on how to succeed in academia and working on product development at Vesco Medical. She joined the research team in December 2015 and is currently working on assessing how motivation plays a role in student success in academia and industry.

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Kaycee Ash The Ohio State University

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Kaycee Ash is a Chemical Engineering undergraduate student at The Ohio State University. She started working towards her Bachelor’s of Science degree in August 2014. In the past, she has worked with other students by helping them better themselves academically, and she has worked on chemical manufacturing and transport at Ohio Chemical Services. She joined the research team in December of 2015 and is currently working on assessing motivation in academia.

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Lin Ding The Ohio State University

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Lin Ding, Ph. D.
Associate Professor
Department of Teaching and Learning
The Ohio State University

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Abstract

The desired knowledge, skills, and abilities of our engineering graduates are continuously being defined by industry and are driving proposed changes to ABET criteria. Industry needs may well affect curricula change to ensure we graduate engineers prepared to meet ever-changing global challenges. The authors believe that effective assessment of learning outcomes must be systematically conducted in order to inform curriculum change.

Funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), the authors used previously reported surveys to identify the top learning outcomes sought by industry. Results from over 1,000 industry representatives identified the top desired learning outcomes which often are not adequately met by current curricula. These are teamwork, communication, project management, critical thinking, curiosity/continuous learning, and motivation. After reviewing currently available assessment tools used in engineering programs, our team chose motivation as the first outcome to assess in our research project. Because capstone design courses often provide an authentic context for practicing engineering, we created a family of assessment tools to measure and track student’s motivation throughout capstone projects. This paper presents three assessment instruments for measuring motivational attitude, behavior, and development and initial data collected from a large pool of capstone students at a large public university. The paper describes initial results and the process of verification and validation.

The team developed assessment instruments using proven research methods and refined them with industry, faculty, and student feedback and through results of multiple conference workshops consisting primarily of capstone faculty. The instruments are currently being administrated three times throughout the duration of seven distinct semester-long and year-long courses. The end objective of this phase is to receive feedback on the tools, modify them based upon this feedback, and prepare for broader testing with seven institutions throughout the country representing a diverse population of engineering students.

Rogers, P., & Davis, D. C., & Winfree, S., & Ash, K., & Ding, L. (2017, June), Work in Progress: Assessing Motivation in Capstone Design Courses Paper presented at 2017 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Columbus, Ohio. 10.18260/1-2--29145

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