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Workshop: Taking it to the Next Level...Game-Based Learning in Engineering Education

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Conference

2018 FYEE Conference

Location

Glassboro, New Jersey

Publication Date

July 24, 2018

Start Date

July 24, 2018

End Date

July 26, 2018

Conference Session

Technical Session VIII

Tagged Topic

FYEE Conference Sessions

Page Count

5

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/31441

Download Count

86

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Paper Authors

biography

Cheryl A Bodnar Rowan University

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Cheryl A. Bodnar, Ph.D., CTDP is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Experiential Engineering Education at Rowan University. Dr. Bodnar’s research interests relate to the incorporation of active learning techniques in undergraduate classes as well as integration of innovation and entrepreneurship into the engineering curriculum. In particular, she is interested in the impact that these tools can have on student perception of the classroom environment, motivation and learning outcomes. She obtained her certification as a Training and Development Professional (CTDP) from the Canadian Society for Training and Development (CSTD) in 2010, providing her with a solid background in instructional design, facilitation and evaluation. She was selected to participate in the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) Frontiers of Engineering Education Symposium in 2013 and awarded the American Society for Engineering Education Educational Research Methods Faculty Apprentice Award in 2014.

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Daniel D. Burkey University of Connecticut

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Daniel Burkey is the Associate Dean of Undergraduate Programs and Professor-in-Residence in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the University of Connecticut. He received his B.S. in chemical engineering from Lehigh University in 1998, and his M.S.C.E.P and Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2000 and 2003, respectively. His primary areas of interest are chemical vapor deposition and engineering pedagogy.

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Daniel D. Anastasio Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

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Daniel Anastasio is an assistant professor at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology. He received a B.S. and Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Connecticut in 2009 and 2015, respectively. His primary areas of research are game-based learning in engineering courses and membrane separations for desalination and water purification.

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Scott Streiner Rowan University

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Dr. Scott Streiner is an assistant professor in the Experiential Engineering Education Department (ExEEd) at Rowan University. He received his Ph.D in Industrial Engineering from the University of Pittsburgh, with a focus in engineering education. His research interests include engineering global competency, curricula and assessment; pedagogical innovations through game-based and playful learning; spatial skills development and engineering ethics education. His funded research explores the nature of global competency development by assessing how international experiences improve the global perspectives of engineering students. Dr. Streiner has published papers and given presentations in global engineering education at several national conferences. Scott is an active member in the Center for the Integration of Research, Teaching, and Learning (CIRTL) both locally and nationally, as well as the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) and the Institute of Industrial and Systems Engineers (IISE).

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Abstract

The use of games within engineering classes has steadily increased, as evidenced by increasing numbers of publications on their implementation and effectiveness. Games within engineering classes can take on a variety of different forms ranging from classroom games (board, card, live action) to digital games and even to gamification elements. In gamification implementations, faculty will leverage principles associated with game-based learning such as storyline, points, leaderboard and badges to help motivate students towards completion of classroom activities. Despite these increases in published implementations of games within engineering, there are still many faculty members that aren’t aware of this pedagogy.

This workshop will provide participants with an understanding of game-based learning and how it can be used within engineering, and will conclude with providing references to help support individuals’ use of this pedagogy. Upon completion of this session, participants will be able to: - List the key properties of a game or game-based learning exercise - Describe different types of games that can be applied in engineering classes - Identify games that match specific learning objectives - Discuss differences in facilitation approaches - Provide ideas for debriefing questions that allow the game to be linked back to technical content

Games and gamification implementations can be very powerful experiences for students as they provide them with an opportunity to learn experientially and then connect their time in game play back to technical course material. Research has shown that implementation of these types of activities leads to a general trend in improvement in both student attitudes and learning. As such, this workshop will provide faculty with the necessary skill sets that will allow greater use of these pedagogical tools in first year engineering classes.

Bodnar, C. A., & Burkey, D. D., & Anastasio, D. D., & Streiner, S. (2018, July), Workshop: Taking it to the Next Level...Game-Based Learning in Engineering Education Paper presented at 2018 FYEE Conference, Glassboro, New Jersey. https://peer.asee.org/31441

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